chord voicing as foreshadowing?

smolder

Platinum Supporting Member
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14,427
There is a philosophy/approach to chording where you change the voicing while in a chord to include notes common to the next chord... I read an article about this about a year ago and can't find it (and neglected to bookmark it)... the article mentioned the CAGE system and was a reference to much of how Bob Weir plays...

...is this familiar to anyone? Know the name or reference the article?
 

dewey decibel

Member
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10,735
No, but it's something i do all the time. At least I think I do, depends on what you're talking about exactly.
 

splatt

david torn / splattercell
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
25,832
are you simply talking about voicing-movement utilising leading tones?
"foreshadowing" is a strange word!
 

smolder

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
14,427
are you talking about voice leading?
that's it! Thanks so much.

http://www.guitarplayer.com/article/bob-weir-on-laying-the-foundation-for-improvisation/147629

"but Voice Leading is just one ACADEMIC way of looking at what Bob Weir was up to, playing RYTHM GUITAR with the dead (you get the idea this applies primarily to his guitar and not singing). look at it this way, in voice leading you are changing the role of the chord/"group of notes" you are playing by only altering SOME of the notes, perhaps as few as one -- the position of the root may change from it's normal position as the lowest tone to the highest one, or disappear all together."
 

splatt

david torn / splattercell
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
25,832
that's it! Thanks so much.

http://www.guitarplayer.com/article/bob-weir-on-laying-the-foundation-for-improvisation/147629

"but Voice Leading is just one ACADEMIC way of looking at what Bob Weir was up to, playing RYTHM GUITAR with the dead (you get the idea this applies primarily to his guitar and not singing). look at it this way, in voice leading you are changing the role of the chord/"group of notes" you are playing by only altering SOME of the notes, perhaps as few as one -- the position of the root may change from it's normal position as the lowest tone to the highest one, or disappear all together."
yes, that's pretty much what i said, only i referenced a specific:
"leading tones".

..... sorry to say that i'm not super-familiar with bob weir, his playing approach & etc.
 

smolder

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
14,427
yes, that's pretty much what i said, only i referenced a specific:
"leading tones".

..... sorry to say that i'm not super-familiar with bob weir, his playing approach & etc.
thnx Splatt... very much appreciate it!
 




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