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Chris Squire's Influences

pcutt

Member
Messages
1,693
Recently I've been re-listening to a lot of early 70s prog and spending quality time with my favorite Yes albums (Yes Album, Fragile, Close to the Edge) and am impressed with Chris Squire's technique and musicality. Other contemporary prog bass players didn't have the same approach at all (Lake, Rutherford, Burrell, Wetton) so I wonder if Squire had developed it on his own or if he had been influenced by others. If he was influenced by others, who are they? I'd like to check them out!
 

Rotten

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,155
He is my favorite part of Yes, and I'm a guitarist! My guess would be that his biggest influences are Paul McCartney and Bach, maybe Larry Graham, but that's just a guess. My favorite bass playing is on the album, Close to the Edge. During the solo section of Siberian Khatru, he covers just about everything.
 

diego

Member
Messages
2,919
FBPO: Who were your influences as a young, up-and-coming bass player?

CS: As I said, I was at that particular age when Paul McCartney was one. And then of course Bill Wyman came along with the Stones and I liked his playing. Not long after that, there was Jack Bruce and the late, great John Entwistle as well. I was a major Who fan when I was 16. There’s a lot to choose from, really, a lot of influences.

FBPO: All those guys you mentioned are British — not that there’s anything wrong with that!

CS: Well, that’s because I lived there, really. That was pretty much the period of the British musical rock & roll explosion anyway. Apart from them, I guess I was aware of Jack Casady and Jefferson Airplane, but really those four guys are my main influences.

https://forbassplayersonly.com/interview-chris-squire/

And specific examples at this link...

http://www.yesworld.com/2013/08/askyes-chris-squires-bass-inspirations/

“Chris was one of those rare musicians that pretty much refused to be influenced,” says Wakeman. “He was the ‘influencer,’ if there is such a word. He treated the bass guitar as more than just propping up the bottom end, and truly considered it to be a lead instrument that deserved recognition, and that’s what he gave the instrument.”

https://www.guitarworld.com/feature...e-story-of-the-hugely-influential-yes-bassist
 

abby_normal

Member
Messages
1,288
He was a great bass player who didn't play his bass like a bass.

Just listened to Close to the Edge the other day.
 




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