Christmas party gig and a waiver

Dave Shoop

Member
Messages
11,730
Played a party for a large company last weekend. We were setting up and the person who booked us came over with paperwork for us to sign. She asked if we would be drinking alcohol at the event. The waiver was a release for the company stating they would not be liable for any accidents or damage done by us due to drinking too much at the event.

That was a first for me. They gave us 4 tickets for drinks which could be used for pop or drinks. I told her I only drank pop at gigs so I wasn't required to sign a waiver. Two of the guys signed the waivers.

Is this the new norm ? Anyone else sign a waiver similar to this to play at a company event this year ? I bet the employees had to sign one too.
 

74vibrolux

Senior Member
Messages
1,556
I don't think it's anything too crazy. Granted, the freaky-ass, noisy, art rock I make isn't exactly corporate gig material. But any large company should probably cover their ass. I'm more surprised they didn't have you sign up front. It's an odd thing to spring on someone. Of course, I'm not a lawyer ... so what do I know?
 

swiveltung

Member
Messages
14,483
I wouldnt fuss over it. They all have to CTA anymore. Risk managers have nightmares.... and their high paid job is on the line if even one happens...
 

Dave Shoop

Member
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11,730
I don't think it's anything too crazy. Granted, the freaky-ass, noisy, art rock I make isn't exactly corporate gig material. But any large company should probably cover their ass. I'm more surprised they didn't have you sign up front. It's an odd thing to spring on someone. Of course, I'm not a lawyer ... so what do I know?

I have no problem with it. Makes sense, better than cancelling all parties out of fear of lawsuit. Glad they did it. Just a first for me.
 

Dana Olsen

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
7,956
Hey Dave -

I've never been asked to sign a waiver at a private function, or a public one. Many times I HAVE been told that the band can't drink on the job - some high end hotels I've played have this as a 'house rule', hell, some not so high-end hotels too - Ha ha. I rarely drink so it's not an imposition to me, but it's interesting that you were asked sign a waiver - I've never heard of that.

Thanks, Dana
 

loudboy

Member
Messages
27,306
How about just not giving the band free drink tickets?

Seems like needless paperwork, but maybe the lawyers needed some dough for Xmas?
 

Dave Shoop

Member
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11,730
I've done Casinos and signed contracts and they all do not permit drinking by the band so far. No gambling either.
 

SarasotaSlim

Member
Messages
1,648
Too many lawyers in this world.

I've signed all manner of waiver over the years. My thoughts are if something terrible happens there will be plenty ambulance chasers willing to chew up their petty papers signed under duress.

Did they get you to load in through the kitchen?!
It's not official until you've entered the realm of 3rd class citizen and had several stern looking important people come by to finger point at some wire or something and try to intimidate you.

My favorite 3rd class moment was when the catering crew was ignoring the wives at the band table and had refused to put anything on it so wife #1 walked over to ask them for knives forks and water and the cranky crew said "they're just the band" as if they didn't deserve to eat or drink. Orange Blossom Catering will forever be on her naughty list.
 

scelerat

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,423
Was some sort contract signed before you showed up to the gig? It seems like that sort of business should have taken place earlier.

What would happened if you had just said, "no"?

If you ask me, it's super shady to pull stuff like that at the last minute. I don't care if it's a get well card for a sick puppy, if you're telling me I have to read through something and sign it *while I'm setting up* for a gig that has presumably already been agreed upon -- I'm not going to like it.
 

Scafeets

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,010
Been there, signed that. A lot of corporate events are starting to cover their butts in any way they can. As someone previously mentioned, it's probably not enforceable ... but I've seen waivers (for employees and contractors) required even without the free drink tickets. I did, however, tell one raving amateur of a party planner that requiring the band to secure a million dollar insurance bond for a gig was a deal-killer. Needless to say, she backed down.
 

Trevordog

Member
Messages
4,617
The last time I played a corporate gig in Manhattan, they took our licenses in the parking garage at the hotel, and we couldn't get them back till the gig was over.
 

marktweedy

In Transit®
Silver Supporting Member
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16,371
What is inherently wrong with asking someone to waive a claim arising out of drinking too much while working? Should people who drink too much while working be able to make a claim for injury or damage?
 

Marc Roy

Member
Messages
15,900
I was asked to sign the same thing at an office Xmas party. It all stemmed from a lawsuit involving an employee who got royally drunk at an office function, drove drunk and killed someone.
 

loudboy

Member
Messages
27,306
Good question. Maybe the company thought the band was more likely to sign the waiver if the company implied that the band would only get free drinks in exchange for the waiver.

That depends on if the waiver covered only drunken misbehavior, not just general misbehavior. OP suggested it was to cover them getting drunk and trashing the place.

Just seems easier to say "no drinking" which is a reasonable request, considering the situation and how much these guys were probably getting paid...
 

Tim Bowen

Member
Messages
3,481
Interesting. I've never been asked to sign such a waiver, but it doesn't surprise me.

I will say that stricter drunk driving laws in the early to mid 1990's *substantially* - and quickly - decreased the amount of corporate parties that I was working, and this also signaled my getting out of the corporate/society/casuals thing as an occupation.

North Carolina in particular took a hard line stance on drunk driving laws during that period. MADD was founded in 1980, so the push had been on for quite some time.
 

cadduc

Member
Messages
5,374
This waiver is not enforceable. If you drink too much and if you have an accident, they are on the hook. No one will be satisfied with the paltry sum a musician and his insurance would offer. Most personal insurance won't cover you if you are intoxicated. However, a company, offers a source of funds. So the company gets sued.

Any waiver or conditions should be discussed, presented, and signed before the gig anyway. It is an interesting idea, but no, it is bs.
 




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