Classic Vibe 60s Strat - My thoughts after 12 years

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Matt Jones, Feb 23, 2020.

  1. hank57

    hank57 Silver Supporting Member

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    The pickup winder has continued the whole time as well. I’ve got several pickups from Onamac Windery. Like your story.
     
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  2. zombiwoof

    zombiwoof Supporting Member

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    In that pic it does look like it's curved a bit. What is the black strip right under the end of the fingerboard?. That might be what made it look to me like the thicker slab board in the other pics.
    Al
     
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  3. 83stratman

    83stratman Member

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    That's weird. Later '62 should start lam board, Strat wise at least. This pic of a "'66" is not lam.

     
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  4. The_Bell

    The_Bell Member

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    Not an expert on actual vintage pieces, my only point was to show a slab and a lam side by side as OP was not familiar with the term.
     
  5. Matt Jones

    Matt Jones Member

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    Great looking guitar.

    Yeah I tracked him down on Reverb last year and I saw he's got a website as well. Good to see he's doing well.

    I think that might just be a shadow.
     
  6. jturner

    jturner Member

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    My first post here @ TGP was in regards to my new (at the time) CV ‘50s Strat, SN #0000032 !

    12 years later, it's still with me -- now on a second set of frets (Dunlop #6105), third selector switch and 2nd vol. pot. Tone and feel far beyond the price tag.
     
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  7. MRCHEVY

    MRCHEVY Member

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    I have this same one and love it. Mods I've done...swapped out Tortoise shell pick guard for white pearloid, changed out pickups to Fender Noiseless, deleted volume pot position and wired it 1 vol 1 tone for all (never liked volume pot so close to pickup, always hitting my pinky on it). Copper shielded the entire cavity and pick guard. Installed Graphtech saddles. I love the thinner neck profile on this guitar, sounds sweet as honey and quiet as a mouse.

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. The_Bell

    The_Bell Member

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    For those who modded, did you find the toneriders slightly on the bright side? Or is the guitar naturally a bit bright? (Or was your experience with the stock setup a bit different than mine).

    I find the 50s extremely stratty sounding, just a bit on the high side with respect to EQ. I own multiple strats, that is my impression by comparison, especially considering the body is alder, albeit light (alder usually gives an amount of low end I like).
     
  9. rickenbackerkid

    rickenbackerkid Member

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    Mine is quite bright, but very, very 'stratty'. I find quite a few Strats I've played are trying hard to sound big and fat and you lose the wiry Strat character.
     
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  10. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    Some people think, "buy a CV and begin modding". That's IMO a terrible idea. Replace the nut and maybe the jack prong, or just do a quite fret level, crown and polish, and just play it. Other, rougher Squiers from other sources are great modding platforms but I always felt like guys had to give up way too much, to actually get net improvement on a CV based project. The exception might be a CV with fretwire that was totally shot (and it can be soft) where the neck is replaced outright with a fat one. The result will look more crude but ain't nothing like a big fat neck on a Strat; and that goes double on a Telecaster or Esquire.
     
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  11. Route67

    Route67 Member

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    I found the pickups on the CV ‘50s Strat articulate and bright (good) like a Strat should be - but the sustain wasn’t quite there which I believe was due to the lightweight zinc alloy tremolo block - I sold the guitar off before doing the upgrade. The CV ‘60s Strat pickups I found thin, mid-scooped and not very bright (lacking colour, dark), though.
     
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  12. MRCHEVY

    MRCHEVY Member

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    Are these not mods themselves?
    With me, I'm not the type who micro analyzes a tone of a guitar. To me, priorities are clarity, a full pallet of tone options, playability, and function. Yes, you can have a variety of tones from a strat depending on structure and hardware, all to suit your ear and personal tastes, but regardless of what you have or do, it's still going to sound like a strat. In my case with the CV60's, I liked the guitar stock. It played well, was comfortable to an extent, and sounded decent. A good foundation to a potentially excellent guitar. I originally wanted the Wine red version but couldn't find one locally at the time, so I settled for the burst. Cosmetically, I hate tortoise shell, plain white seemed a bit bland, so I added the pearloid. The original pickups sounded fine for me, but I've always been a Les Paul type (humbuckers) and just couldn't cope with the noisy pickup factor of single coils, hence the Fender Noiseless Pickups, problem solved.

    Electronics wise, I hated the position of the Vol knob. I found it to intrusive to my right hand playing position and didn't see the need for more than one VOL and TONE, so I deleted the vol position and wired it 1 vol 1 tone to control all 3 pickups, problem solved.

    the last thing was changing the saddles. I went with the modern style because of comfort more than anything. The traditional saddle height screws stuck up above the top of the saddles and dug into my hand. I'm a rest your hand on the bridge kinda player, and the flat surface of the modern saddles make a very comfortable place to rest my hand. I have taken every guitar I own and modded it or tweaked it in some way to perfection (for me), no matter how fine an instrument it was to start with. My Les Paul Custom was a thing of beauty in every way to start with. Now it has JB/JAZZ pickups in it, and I rewired it 50's style. It is a mojo machine now.

    Some people like things the way they buy them and that's fine. Me, I feel there's always room for improvement and I like tinkering with things anyway. Shy of a special custom built guitar just for you, guitars are mass produced and are seldom a "perfect fit" right off the rack. Obviously, it's important to find a good fit to start with. There is a point where a guitar is just to far off from what you like, and getting it there is just not cost effective or maybe not even possible. It is a search for QUAN (if you saw the "Jerry Maguire" movie, you know QUAN)
     
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  13. The_Bell

    The_Bell Member

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    Hopefully not derailing here, I dug up the one clip I recall being of this guitar. This is on the neck pickup - to my ears, very good sounding and articulate as you say - but also very different from a typical A5 neck (i.e. the "beef"). If others find this sound pretty typical of theirs, curious if I am hearing the pups or something that the woods would still bring out in a pup swap:

     
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  14. dazco

    dazco Member

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    It's totally op to the individual's perception. To me it was a alderbodied RW board strat with features i could not find on anything else w/o going to a cusom shop model or such. So to me it was a case of being extremely pleased with the features, the radius and frets and the body contours which by the way are different than my MIM classic 60s and is much more comfy. Then theres the weight, a touch over 7 Lbs which to me is a major bonus. In other words, here i have a very ideal strat that ticks every box except for the things i modded. So way not take a set of fat 50s i already had and the callaham trem off my MIM (which i parted out and sold due to liking the CV much better !) and add CTS and CRL for a few more bucks? Why not? Right now i have a strat that i enjoy so much more then my MIM, and i LOVED the mIM which was my #1 for almost 20 years ! So now i have a strat that was dirt cheap ($200 used) and i like so much that i parted out my 20 year #1 and am happier with it. Why was that not a good thing? I lost nothing. Even if i had to buy those parts which i already had, if i ever sold it which i have no intention of ever doing, all i would have to do is put the stock parts back and no loss. (well, the callaham i'd have to replace with one of my old classic series trems because i redrilled for the cally and now the spacing is vintage spec) I get that you said "for me", but i just wanted to detail my "for me". I now have a strat that ticks every box and several more than my MIM did. I think that was a damn good move, and if happiness is the gauge then it DEFINITELY was ! By the way, i mod pretty much every guitar i get because they are almost never my idea of perfect everything. My MIM was AS modded as my CV but it still weighed a Lb more and the body wasn't as comfy and i didn't like the 7.25" and vintage frets near as much. Win win win win......But yeah, thats just me. I am a modder and make no apologies because it works for me. :D
     
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  15. DonP

    DonP Member

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    Still love the 50's CV I got about a year ago. Tone is perfect, neck is perfect.

    I do have a Callaham block and Highwood saddles waiting for when I do the next string change. I'm hoping these upgrades don't harm the current tone, or I may undo them.
     
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  16. dazco

    dazco Member

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    Well, if u think the tone is perfect why put a callaham in it? Personally mine has a full callaham trem and i do prefer it over the stock trem but the stock trem has certain tonal details that i think are good. In time tho i came to realize i needed to put my callaham in it and that did exactly what i expected. But while i liked it stock, unlike u i don't think the tone ws perfect or else i wouldn't have put the callaham in it. In any case, i would suggest that even if u feel the callaham and highwoods don't sound as good that u use them anyways for at least a week if not more before u return to stock. Because out brains have a way of becoming used to a sound and any change even for the better may not seem as good till you get used to it, at which point you may find it better. I find the stock trem has a certain punch that is a peak at some mid frequency thats kinda nice that even the callaham doesn't have. But the callaham is much more balanced and thats why. Given a chance i think you will much prefer it, so give it time because even at the end of that time if u don't think u like it as much, returning to stock may make you realize the upgrade actually WAS a upgrade. Mind plays tricks on modders....the more u realize that the more chance of ending up with the best sound.
     
  17. themannamedbones

    themannamedbones Member

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    I bought one for my sister, who is still rocking it. The kids have reliced it for free. Plays great and those pickups are good. If there was a weak link it was the pots.
     
  18. DonP

    DonP Member

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    Because it is sitting there, and how would I know if I liked it or not unless I try it?
     
  19. dazco

    dazco Member

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    No, i meant why buy them if you thought it was perfect. No mater, just curious.
     
  20. Route67

    Route67 Member

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    I think it’s the clear sound and articulation of the lower wind pickups and as you say without added ‘beef’ - there’s a delicate purity to it, which I like - provides lots of room for expressive nuance played through Fender clean. But what I did notice with my ‘50s Strat when the volume was turned up was loss of note focus - notes became fuzzy, and not due to the amp - rather a problem with the particular guitar, which I had guessed at the time was due to the light weight trem block, but maybe the lightweight alder body under a thick finish (?).
     
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