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clearsonic amp sheilds?

es137p

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,615
anyone use these? Can never find an attenuator that I like. Do you lose high end with these? Mostly play smaller joints these days.
 

GAT

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
18,967
I"ve used them for years. They help with the laser beam to the ears of the audience, then you can turn up a bit more. They may slightly cut the highs to the audience. On most small stages they sound about the same to me.
 

Jimi D

Member
Messages
1,434
^^^ What they said... I set mine up about three feet in front of my cab... let's me use my Mark V on 90 watt mode without hurting anyone sitting directly in front of me... Gets rid of the beamy-ness too... and doesn't look as arsed as pointing your cab at the back wall or across the stage...
 

es137p

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,615
hey GAT, not sure what you meant when you said, "on most small stages they sound about the same to me". Does that mean, they don't make a difference, volume wise on small stages?
 

chance0

Member
Messages
956
Most of those shields can cause major phase issues that lead to dips/peaks in your frequency response, which can be fatiguing to the listener. And they don't truly attenuate to the magnitude of an actual attenuator. Try using sound-absorption paneling instead, if possible; it doesn't reflect the sound back and cause phasing issues as much, and it will absorb more of the sound pressure and reduce the ice-pick beaming. You can usually find these absorption panels online, and people typically use them to deaden a 'live' room.
 
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DaveKS

Member
Messages
16,704
Get a old small suitcase, you can use it to tote your cables etc and when your all set up, stand it up on end in a V in front of your amp. Is sound absorbing to a degree and also doubles as a tote. Win/Win.

 

tele_jas

Member
Messages
3,769
I"ve used them for years. They help with the laser beam to the ears of the audience, then you can turn up a bit more. They may slightly cut the highs to the audience. On most small stages they sound about the same to me.
This....

I don't use the actual brand name, I made my own with some plexi-glass and some hinges from the hardware store. Use it at every gig, small and big (not the REALLY big ones though). It helps out a lot and even puts me in the PA mix a little more and just sounds better.
 

GAT

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
18,967
hey GAT, not sure what you meant when you said, "on most small stages they sound about the same to me". Does that mean, they don't make a difference, volume wise on small stages?
I meant that on stage the guitar sounds the same to me. It does cut some of the volume to the audience, but more importantly, it cuts the harsh beaming to the audience. That's the sound that most non-guitarists hate. Drums, bass, keys can all play loud as hell, but there's something about a guitar amp beaming at your ears that is very annoying. I've sat in front of many guitarist's amps and in close proximity it can be really fatiguing.

Most of those shields can cause major phase issues that leads to dips/peaks in your frequency response, which can be fatiguing to the listener. And they don't truly attenuate to the magnitude of an actual attenuator. Try using sound-absorption paneling instead, if possible; it doesn't reflect the sound back and cause phasing issues, and it will absorb more of the sound pressure and reduce the ice-pick beaming. You can usually find these absorption panels online, and people typically use them to deaden a 'live' room.
I've used mine for years and if you position it correctly the phase issues are a non-issue for me. Joe Bonamassa has used them for years too, in fact, he turned me on to them. About a year ago I met up with Joe and he was still using them and his tone is killer.

I personally like the look of clear plexiglass vs. something completely blocking the amp. YMMV

Here I am with Joe and you can see his large Clearsonics in front of a bunch 100 watters.
 
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chance0

Member
Messages
956


I meant that on stage the guitar sounds the same to me. It does cut some of the volume to the audience, but more importantly, it cuts the harsh beaming to the audience. That's the sound that most non-guitarists hate. Drums, bass, keys can all play loud as hell, but there's something about a guitar amp beaming at your ears that is very annoying. I've sat in front of many guitarist's amps and in close proximity it can be really fatiguing.



I've used mine for years and if you position it correctly the phase issues are a non-issue for me. Joe Bonamassa has used them for years too, in fact, he turned me on to them. About a year ago I met up with Joe and he was still using them and his tone is killer.

I personally like the look of clear plexiglass vs. something completely blocking the amp. YMMV

Here I am with Joe and you can see his large Clearsonics in front of a bunch 100 watters.
If I'm right, Joe mics his amps, and that mic'd sound will punch through the PA, giving minimal phase issues because it's the dominant sound. It makes sense for Joe to use the panels if he wants to kill the 'beam' completely. You can see a mic in that photo, bottom center.

But yes, if you get them angular, some of the reflected sound will hit the backline where it will be absorbed. But the way Clearsonic presents them on their website and the way it's set up in your photo is, technically speaking, used best for killing the beam associated with large-coned speakers. A little sound absorption foam attached to the Clearsonic should give optimal results. The foam that Jay Mitchell used for his "Donut" should work nicely here.

I rather like the suitcase idea. Put a little sound-absorbing foam (again, the Donut material) in there and it should serve most 1-12 and 2-12 cabs very nicely. Holds accessories, too. Heck, you could just open your guitar case and put it in front, plush material facing your amp; the material in there should serve even better than a Clearsonic.
 

jpage

Senior Member
Messages
9,249
GAT speaks the truth-I wouldn't think about using a tube amp live without a shield. The band likes it as well as it deflects your tone across the stage making you easier to hear without being 'louder'
 

GAT

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
18,967
Yeah, I use it at every gig. I did forget it when we played a bigger show with the Mavericks and the FOH guy had me turn my amp a bit off axis. When I have the shield the sound guys never complain.
 

bettset

Member
Messages
4,203
GAT speaks the truth-I wouldn't think about using a tube amp live without a shield. The band likes it as well as it deflects your tone across the stage making you easier to hear without being 'louder'
same here. at a certain volume the shield does as intended. when i need to turn a 100 watt amp up big time, then the shield goes in front :munch
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,232
I haven't found them to be of any use. They don't lower the volume in the room so much as lower the volume directly behind the shield. They're good for stopping the narrow swath of audience directly in front of your amp from getting beamed, and for isolating the mics on the amps, but not much else, in my opinion. I play combos amps anyway, so I just tilt them back to keep the audience from getting beamed and position them to keep the mics from picking up too much bleed to achieve the same effect. I could see them being useful on a big stage where you're micing amps into a massive P.A. But if you're looking to lower the volume, I think you'd be better off with an attenuator or some other method.
 

michael.e

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
20,516
The only time I have ever had phasing issues has been when I place it in too close proximity to the cab. Otherwise, mic'd, in-mic'd, it does its job. It is not intended to lower volume, that is the wrong use for this. If that is your objective, then yes, get an attenuator. My rig sounds better and responds better at gig volumes with it. Plus, I can push the amp a little harder.
 

Dave_C

Member
Messages
14,096
Don't give up on attenuators just yet. Try the Power Station, you'll be surprised at the results.
THIS! ^^^^^ IMO, it's an infinitely better solution than plexi shields! Plus, it doesn't block your path to the amp if you need to make any adjustments midstream.
 

es137p

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,615
Dave_C, I'm still searching for a attenuator that doesn't squash my sound.
 




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