Cocobolo Necks

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by stan p, Apr 25, 2008.

  1. stan p

    stan p Member

    Messages:
    1,067
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2003
    What does Cocobolo sound like when used for the neck (not the FB)?

    Thanks in advance to all who answers!

    Stan
     
  2. gitman

    gitman Member

    Messages:
    982
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Location:
    western europe
  3. Douglas Baines

    Douglas Baines Member

    Messages:
    285
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    I'm almost done building my new one... I let you know how it sounds!
    The wood taps out VERY loud, so resonance is guaranteed as far as I'm concerned.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. paraedolia

    paraedolia Member

    Messages:
    1,278
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2008
    Location:
    Canada
    Looks pretty, it's beautiful hardwood, but isn't cocobolo pretty allergenic? Aren't you running a risk of contact allergy?
     
  5. gitman

    gitman Member

    Messages:
    982
    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2004
    Location:
    western europe
    the wood dust can cause allergic reactions. it's safe if you wear a face mask. the finished wood is harmless.
     
  6. JTC

    JTC Member

    Messages:
    146
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2007
    Location:
    Fort Lauderdale
    Cocobolo was often used for nightsticks. When I used it on someone's neck, it sounded like:

    "THUD....." :horse
     
  7. Douglas Baines

    Douglas Baines Member

    Messages:
    285
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    I'm one of those rare people that don't seem to be allergic to anything. I've been breathing that cocobolo dust for months now and I've had no reaction to it whatsoever... My brother, on the other hand, is terribly allergic to almost all rosewoods - but especially cocobolo. He made himself some cocobolo "plug" earrings out of the stuff and his ears just flared up something awful.

    (for those who don't know what I'm talking about, "plugs" are the types of earrings that people wear when they have their earlobes not only pierced, but stretched as well. my brother has a business making these.)
     
  8. stan p

    stan p Member

    Messages:
    1,067
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2003
    Very nice!!!
     
  9. stan p

    stan p Member

    Messages:
    1,067
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2003
    Hey Doug,

    I noticed you are in Ontario! Where about are you? Thak you. STan
     
  10. mbrown3

    mbrown3 Member

    Messages:
    483
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2006
    I am the (proud) owner of Myka #70, and I wasn't planning on going with cocobolo until David talked me into it. I'm REALLY glad he did. It has a great "focused" tone that is great for lead. Nice deep rich tone. I love it. If I can get my act together in the next few days, I'll post a clip or two.
     
  11. otaypanky

    otaypanky Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,789
    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2006
    Location:
    the Northern Neck of Virginia
    Years ago I tried my hand at some wood carving, coached by a friend who was a very accomplished carver. The mauls we used were made of cocobola and were extremely hard. I don't even remember them showing signs of wear from striking the chisels. The grain and coloring in the wood was gorgeous
    That guitar is looking sweet Douglas B !
     
  12. dbeeman

    dbeeman Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    5,231
    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2003
    Location:
    DFW
    Nice looking. Anymore pics?

    Clever name for your company too ... a guy named Douglas making Dark Water guitars ;)
     
  13. Quinny

    Quinny Member

    Messages:
    1,307
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    I've two cocobolo necks currently. One on my Heatley:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    And one on the Driskill:

    [​IMG]

    I prefer cocobolo over the BRW/IRW I've tried over the years. For me it's a feel thing, cocobolo gets a great silky patina to it with plenty of usage and feels so effortless. Hard to say what the tonal differences are without having each on the same axe.... but for plenty of low end and detail and articulation within it, these two guitars hit the spot. Heatley's doing me another 335-a-like, I think the cocobolo neck on that one is coming from the same chunk as my number 1 above. :)

    Q.
     
  14. oscar100

    oscar100 Member

    Messages:
    1,290
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2004
    Location:
    london UK
    think ron thorn used it a few times and found it horrible to work with
    :eek:
     
  15. Cobra

    Cobra Supporting Member

    Messages:
    5,105
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2003
    Location:
    NE Wisc.
    I've seen lot's of guitars in this forum with rosewood necks, & some with cocobolo. I've always wondered if they add to the overall weight, & increase the likelyhood of a neck-heavy guitar.

    I'm also curious how a rosewood or cocobolo neck affects the tone compared to a mahogany or limba neck with a rosewood board?
     
  16. fretnot

    fretnot Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,279
    Joined:
    May 4, 2004
    Location:
    Philly burbs
    A cocobolo neck would be heavy, at least compared to a maple or mahogany neck. A little too dark for my tastes from my experience, but it's frickin' gorgeous to look at!
    :banana
     
  17. John Mayes

    John Mayes Member

    Messages:
    306
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2004
    Location:
    Norman, Oklahoma
    I've used coco extensively in my acoustic guitars as back and side material, also have used it quite a bit as a FB material. Never used it as a neck wood. It is, however, a very hard, heavy and dense wood that has quite a bit of oils in it. Bright orange when first cut but oxidizes to a crimson/burnt orange over time. Should help with sustain with the added weight and stiffness.
     
  18. Aardvark

    Aardvark Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,664
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2007
    Location:
    Georgia
    I actually have a Melancon T-style with mahogany body, and originally with a mahogany neck. After a while, I decided the neck contour was not right for me and talked to Gerard about a new neck. I realized at that time that he also offered solide Indian rosewood necks, so I went for it. Compared to the mahogany neck on this guitar (which sounded fine), the new rosewood neck has better bass, sustain, and punch. It may be slightlly darker but still has plenty of sparkly highs. It has a bit more fundamental and not quite as much complex airiness compared to the mahogany. All in all, I love it as an alternative to the mahogany, although I would not own only rosewood necks. I think it would be a good choice for blues and rock leads, maybe not as well suited to country. Of course, it looks beautiful and feels supreme. Here is mine:[​IMG]
     
  19. Douglas Baines

    Douglas Baines Member

    Messages:
    285
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2005
    Location:
    Seattle, WA

    I went to lutherie school at Lado Guitars in Lindsay, but I grew up the better part of my childhood in Niagara Falls, Ont. These days I live in Seattle, Washington in the United States. Big move! Where are you from?


    You are the first person who has understood the reference! It’s a little vain, I know, but I like it! More pics on my website.

     
  20. sparky_8

    sparky_8 Member

    Messages:
    652
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2003
    Location:
    Pasadena Tx
    I have cocobolo on my Driskill. I have played a braz necked Driskill and 2 cocobolo necked Driskills including mine of course. My top is Koa so I can't comment on the difference it makes on a non cocobolo koa Driskill as mine is the only koa top out there... The 2 maple top braz and coco Driskills I played sounded almost identical. Bell like tone really beefs up the midrange and low end. I tend to love midrange so the combo of coco neck and koa top is absolutely perfect for me. Cocobolo is actually a denser wood than brazilian but as others have said it's a pain to work with and many are allergic to it.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page