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Collector Guitars

Chicago Slim

Member
Messages
4,500
What guitar/guitars do you collect?

Pictures Please.

Why don't you play it?

Here's mine:

2012 Gibson Diablo Premium Plus. It plays and sounds great, but I don't like the way it hangs from a guitar strap. Since it doesn't get played much, it's in much better shape than my other guitars. They seem fairly rare, so I'm hoping that it will become valuable, one day.



 

jlb32

Member
Messages
2,228
Very few guitars will ever become valuable or collectible, depending on what you consider valuable. Don't think we will ever see another Gibson '58-'60 Les Paul scenario.

Guitars are just not good investments if you are looking for big returns as a collector over time. There are just so many guitars out there these days and the market is pretty down and flooded.

Just enjoy them IMO. If you do not like the way your SG hangs then maybe sell it to fund a guitar you would enjoy more.
 

RICFREAK

Member
Messages
2,146
A guitar is worth as much as what a buyer is willing to pay.
I have some deemed collectible for their rarity, not their worth.... and I will not hesitate to play them if the occasion calls for it. :cool:
 

doesitmatter

Member
Messages
582
I now have 3 Les Pauls so I guess I collect those. Looking for a reissue to complete my quest.

I've got a few Fenders but I mostly build Teles and strats now so those are more projects than collectibles.
 

Guitarworks

Member
Messages
11,031
Hang on to it. Keep it as is. Take good care of it. You never know what gear is going to be valuable, very valuable, or extremely valuable one day. As long as companies discontinue things, and change specs, or make a limited number, the odds are always in your favor. As long as there are people wishing they hadn't sold something, odds will always be in your favor. As long as there are people wishing they'd "gotten one when the gettin' was good" and will pay top dollar for a second chance to own one, odds will always be in your favor. As more and more wood species become protected, odds will always be in your favor. There would be no such term as "investment grade guitars" if guitars did not escalate in value. And the reason they're valuable is that something changed. And as long as change is the only constant in life, odds will always be in your favor.
 

John Backlund

Member
Messages
786
It might seem weird, but I've been collecting 'my own' guitars as much as finances will allow, these include J. Backlund Design, Retronix, and as many of the new Eastwood 'Backlund' guitars as I can get my hands on.

So far, I have two US built JBD guitars, a model 400, and a model 200, but that's all for that brand. I hope to run across a JBD-100 someday...and I hope I'll have the cash available when I do find one, I'll probably need between $1800-$2500 to snag the thing.

I have a blue Retronix R-100, one of only four sales samples built.

I have a blue/cream Eastwood model 100, and will be buying two more in mid January, a red/cream model, and a black/mint green example.

I have four, one-off prototypes, as well as a Chinese pirated rip-off model 400. We're pretty certain that It was the only one made.

All in all, I currently have nine of 'my' guitars, up to eleven by the end of January, and probably at least two more added in 2017.
 
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Chicago Slim

Member
Messages
4,500
I used to have several '60's Gibsons. I kept a mid '60's, American made Epiphone Sorrento, for about 25 years. It was rarer than my other Gibsons. I didn't play it much, because it had a small neck like a broom stick. Someone offered me a trade for a 2001, PRS SAS. At that time, I was starting my second career, as a full time musician. That guitar, I played the crap out of. I used it on virtually all of the studio work that I did.

The SG Diablo sounds great, and I wish that I had it back when I was doing studio work. Now that I've retired, I have a much better guitar collection, than when I was a working musician. But I don't really want or need to sell any of my good guitars, to buy something else. I'm at the point where I'll sell a PRS SE or Squire CV50, if I need to made room for another guitar.

I thought that you guys would post some interesting guitar pictures.
 
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axe4me

Member
Messages
4,150
Teye LaPirata in "Black Shipwreck" finish.
One of the last made by Teye before the company was taken over by The Gypsy Guitar Co.
Single pick up with a cool blend knob.
To my understanding, this build is very influenced by Zemaitis guitars.



1956 Gibson Les Paul Junior.
Great guitar that's designated as a "student" guitar.
Great tone and volume. A joy to play.




1994 Gibson L20 Koa.
About 30 of these were made.
Beautiful flamed Koa back and sides.
Wide ebony fretboard; pearl block inlays; ebony tipped tuning pegs and a flower pot headstock inlay make this guitar more unique.
I found this used in a small shop and was able to buy it for a song because their rent was due.





James Trussart Steelphonic.
VERY 335 like sounds mixed with a resonator tone feel.
Cool "lizard" top with a piezo p/u and separate volume control and Arcane PAF style humbuckers.





James Trussart Steel DeVille.
Cool shiney chrome top and "holey" back.
The ebony neck has aluminum dot inlays and aluminum neck binding on a flamed maple neck.
Arcane humbuckers.
I drove 250+ miles to Virginia to buy this.






PRS "Employee" CE
Has 2 large toggle switches.
One for p/u selection and the other as a tap.
2 Duncan Antiquities and a single coil Lindy Fralin in the middle.
Unique and one of a kind.




Kramer Steve Ripley Model.
Has a single active Bartolini humbucker and a pan pot for each string.
It's stereo.





Pawar Turn Of The Century.
Hand carved with tone chambers.
#17.
One of the very few (maybe only one) with a Bigsby Trem.
It has 20 different p/u combinations.
Maple top with a swamp ash body.
Not for everyone but an incredible guitar.






1962 Gibson SG Les Paul Junior.
A Screamer and tone machine.
Nice baseball bat neck and light as a feather.
I bought it with an optional original hard shell yellow lined case.






1971 Gibson Les Paul Standard 58 Model.
Norlin didn't do their research in naming this guitar.
It's really a 1954 re-issue.
It has a one piece body; no valute on the neck and narrow binding in the cutaway.
There were about 1100 made.
Most were gold tops.Some were cherry sunburst and a very few were tobacco sunburst.
Les Paul signed the pick guard.


 

Chicago Slim

Member
Messages
4,500
axe4me, that's an amazing collection!

The '62 SG Jr, looks like my first guitar. I remember the more expensive SG's having thin, rubbery feeling necks. While my Jr was solid, like 2X4.
 

Stratburst70

Member
Messages
5,916
I have a couple of old Gibsons that I rarely gig with, for several reasons.



I found this player-grade '59 Les Paul Junior about 18 years ago, and bought it for about 1/3 of its worth. I gigged it for a while but I had too many people taking notice of it, saying, "If you ever want to sell that guitar..." So I retired it from live use before someone tried to apply ye olde five-finger-discount. I still have it, but it's mainly a case queen since I don't do much studio work anymore and I use my Strats for 90% of my live work. I don't want to get rid of it because I like it so much.



This guitar is identical to the 1930's Gibson L-00 I inherited from my grandmother. She played it for many years and then my aunt played it as well before she started getting the "If you ever want to sell that guitar..." schtick. My aunt gave it to me because she can no longer play due to arthritis. It mainly stays in its case during the winter months, and occasionally comes out during the summer. I rarely get a chance to play guitar at a time when I'm not disturbing someone. :p
 

Taller

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,891
I bought a David Lozeau Strat. It's just a Mexican Strat, but it has Lozeau's art work on it.
Don't know why I had to have it, but I bought it strictly as something cool to hang on the wall. I love the graphics. I need to visit his Web site to see if he's still got prints of this particular piece still for sale.
I got it off of Reverb from a dealer in Wisconsin, for a great price. I guess southern California low brow kitschy art isn't too popular in Wisconsin! ;)
I bring it down a couple of times a year to clean it and wipe the strings down and tune it...work the pots...
I understand these were limited to 500 ea. but I honestly didn't buy it thinking it might be worth something. I dig it!


 

John Backlund

Member
Messages
786
I finally figured out how to post photo images here (again), been having problems with that sort of thing lately, but here's the little collection of 'my stuff' that I mentioned in a previous post in this thread.

I assume that they are only 'collectable' to me and are not worth very much in monetary terms, but they are certainly quite rare. The ones that are/were produced in the greatest numbers are the green Retronix R-800 on the top left, with perhaps as many as 150 in existence, and the blue/cream Eastwood model 100 on the lower left, with, again, about 140-150 being sold, though that guitar is still available and the numbers should slowly increase with time.

Third from the lower right is a US built J Backlund Design model 400. This one is number #4 of five, or possibly six that were made of this type in Chattanooga. There will be a few more of these in the near future because this model is currently being offered by the Canadian guitar company, Eastwood, though it will be of Korean manufacture.

To the right of the model 400 is the pirated Chinese JBD-400 knock-off, and a poor quality job of it at that, but it's an interesting part of my guitar history and I've been able to buy it from the company that made if. It is the only one they made, and apparently had enough of a problem making this one that, as far as I can tell, they haven't offered any more of them. It took three years to aquire this guitar from the the time I first became aware of it. It's a piece of crap, but it fascinated me that anyone would want to steal my original design.

Second from the left on the top row is a black, Chattanooga-built, J Backlund Design JBD-200. There may be as many as twenty of this model in the world, but it is also one of the models that was recently offered by Eastwood as a Korean variant, but even so, only forty of them were ordered, though sales of this model will trickle along for a period.

To the JBD-200's right hangs the singular model 1500 'Neptoon' prototype, commisioned by me, and made by Dutch builder Marco Krijger, it is the only one of it's type, as is the gold model 1100 'Marz' prototype to it's right.

The last in this little group of stringed oddities is the green/cream model 700 'Katalina' prototype on the far top right. Again, built for me by Marco Krijger in Holland. This guitar may well see limited production by Eastwood in the not-so-distant future, but nothing is written in stone, so who knows.
 
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sleepingtiger

Member
Messages
4,329
Teye LaPirata in "Black Shipwreck" finish.
One of the last made by Teye before the company was taken over by The Gypsy Guitar Co.
Single pick up with a cool blend knob.
To my understanding, this build is very influenced by Zemaitis guitars.



1956 Gibson Les Paul Junior.
Great guitar that's designated as a "student" guitar.
Great tone and volume. A joy to play.




1994 Gibson L20 Koa.
About 30 of these were made.
Beautiful flamed Koa back and sides.
Wide ebony fretboard; pearl block inlays; ebony tipped tuning pegs and a flower pot headstock inlay make this guitar more unique.
I found this used in a small shop and was able to buy it for a song because their rent was due.





James Trussart Steelphonic.
VERY 335 like sounds mixed with a resonator tone feel.
Cool "lizard" top with a piezo p/u and separate volume control and Arcane PAF style humbuckers.





James Trussart Steel DeVille.
Cool shiney chrome top and "holey" back.
The ebony neck has aluminum dot inlays and aluminum neck binding on a flamed maple neck.
Arcane humbuckers.
I drove 250+ miles to Virginia to buy this.






PRS "Employee" CE
Has 2 large toggle switches.
One for p/u selection and the other as a tap.
2 Duncan Antiquities and a single coil Lindy Fralin in the middle.
Unique and one of a kind.




Kramer Steve Ripley Model.
Has a single active Bartolini humbucker and a pan pot for each string.
It's stereo.





Pawar Turn Of The Century.
Hand carved with tone chambers.
#17.
One of the very few (maybe only one) with a Bigsby Trem.
It has 20 different p/u combinations.
Maple top with a swamp ash body.
Not for everyone but an incredible guitar.






1962 Gibson SG Les Paul Junior.
A Screamer and tone machine.
Nice baseball bat neck and light as a feather.
I bought it with an optional original hard shell yellow lined case.






1971 Gibson Les Paul Standard 58 Model.
Norlin didn't do their research in naming this guitar.
It's really a 1954 re-issue.
It has a one piece body; no valute on the neck and narrow binding in the cutaway.
There were about 1100 made.
Most were gold tops.Some were cherry sunburst and a very few were tobacco sunburst.
Les Paul signed the pick guard.


FWIW, Teye is now & has been in control of the manufacture guitars bearing his name since 2015. From what I understand, the year 2014 is the only year of the Nashville built guitars. I have a 2014 Coyote myself & I love it! Teye himself has wonderful things to say about the 2014's on his website. Just an FYI...

Tony
 
M

Member 132475

I finally figured out how to post photo images here (again), been having problems with that sort of thing lately, but here's the little collection of 'my stuff' that I mentioned in a previous post in this thread.

I assume that they are only 'collectable' to me and are not worth very much in monetary terms, but they are certainly quite rare. The ones that are/were produced in the greatest numbers are the green Retronix R-800 on the top left, with perhaps as many as 150 in existence, and the blue/cream Eastwood model 100 on the lower left, with, again, about 140-150 being sold, though that guitar is still available and the numbers should slowly increase with time.

Third from the lower right is a US built J Backlund Design model 400. This one is number #4 of five, or possibly six that were made of this type in Chattanooga. There will be a few more of these in the near future because this model is currently being offered by the Canadian guitar company, Eastwood, though it will be of Korean manufacture.

To the right of the model 400 is the pirated Chinese JBD-400 knock-off, and a poor quality job of it at that, but it's an interesting part of my guitar history and I've been able to buy it from the company that made if. It is the only one they made, and apparently had enough of a problem making this one that, as far as I can tell, they haven't offered any more of them. It took three years to aquire this guitar from the the time I first became aware of it. It's a piece of crap, but it fascinated me that anyone would want to steal my original design.

Second from the left on the top row is a black, Chattanooga-built, J Backlund Design JBD-200. There may be as many as twenty of this model in the world, but it is also one of the models that was recently offered by Eastwood as a Korean variant, but even so, only forty of them were ordered, though sales of this model will trickle along for a period.

To the JBD-200's right hangs the singular model 1500 'Neptoon' prototype, commisioned by me, and made by Dutch builder Marco Krijger, it is the only one of it's type, as is the gold model 1100 'Marz' prototype to it's right.

The last in this little group of stringed oddities is the green/cream model 700 'Katalina' prototype on the far top right. Again, built for me by Marco Krijger in Holland. This guitar may well see limited production by Eastwood in the not-so-distant future, but nothing is written in stone, so who knows.
Should be a line of amps to go with those guys. This one for instance:

 

C-4

Member
Messages
14,164
I was never really a "collector" in the true sense of the word.
I realized a long time ago that unless I was collecting well-desired 1950's bursts, GT's, 3X5, D'Angelico's, or pre-war pearled Martins and F-5 mandolins, that there would never be enough of a market ongoing for the more current guitars being produced unless it was from a very select buyer.

More recently amplifiers such as 50's Fender Bassman 4x10's, early Vox AC15's and 30's, and p-t-p Marshall Plexis and some other amps can be added to this list.
 

Devnor

Member
Messages
3,798
I have one "collector" guitar, this Anderson Pro Am airbrushed by Dan Lawrence. I've only lightly strummed it twice. Thought I could remove the painted pickups and rings but they aren't coming out without breaking up the finish where the parts meet. It's okay, I have another Anderson I can play instead. Eventually I'll get around to ordering a glass case for mounting in my home. It's a "collector" only in name; it will never increase in value and there is no reason for it to do so. I'm a huge Rainbow fan. Some people blow their cash on signed footballs and the like, I just have the guitar. Enjoy!

 

Da Geezer

Member
Messages
5,036
@Musicman100
Use a hosting service (like imgur.com), or become a supporting member ($12) and you can have them hosted here and then post them directly to the page
 






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