Collings OM standard nut is 1 11/16, but why?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by Killcrop, Sep 8, 2019.

  1. Killcrop

    Killcrop Supporting Member

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    I wonder why? Seems like most OM guitars have a 1 3/4 nut for finger style.
     
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  2. ieso

    ieso Member

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    I prefer 1 3/4 but switching back and forth between electric and acoustic is a lot easier (for me) with that narrower nut width. When I play my Martin I wish all my guitars had a wider nut and when I play my electric I wish all my acoustics had a narrower nut :D
     
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  3. Humble Texan Fan

    Humble Texan Fan Member

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    There's just no standard here. You would really have to look up the 000/ OM story to grasp the complexity - is there really an OM or are they all just 000s?
     
  4. Crowder

    Crowder Dang Twangler Silver Supporting Member

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    IIRC Collings don't have a single standard nut width across the entire line of acoustics.
     
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  5. DanR

    DanR Member

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    At least according to Martin, a 000 has a 24.9" scale and an OM has a 25.4" scale. Other makers may not follow that protocol as I've seen 'short scale' OM's advertised. And until fairly recently, Martin 000's had a 1 11/16" nut as opposed to the OM's 1 3/4" nut.
     
  6. Humble Texan Fan

    Humble Texan Fan Member

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    Well that's where Martin draws the line in modern times. The story is more complex than that, though, and some would say most 000s are actually OMs. I'll explain.

    Martin was aways about the long scale and 12 frets clear. Then some banjo player approached Martin eith the suggestion could they make a 000 acoustic with 15 frets clear, like a banjo. They made it 14 frets, as we know them today: the Orchestra Model

    Eventually Martin offered 14 f versions of all their products, all of them refered to as OMs.

    During this time players were usibg increasingly heavier gauge strings, which made Martin cone up with the belly bridge and shortened the scale to better handle the torque.

    Time passes, most guitars are 14 f, necks become slimmer and the OM nomen is dropped. At the comeback of the 12 f instruments Martin start using the "S" suffix.

    Eventually other builders begin to offer "the OM" with the vintage scale and nut width. Martin was actually quite slow to pick this up.

    So from certain point of view most Martin 000s are actually short-scale OMs, of which the EC signature being the missing link with its wide nut and short scale.
     
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  7. Thwap

    Thwap Silver Supporting Member

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    Right, my Collings OM1mh is 1 3/4
    and I played 3-4 this last weekend at Dusty strings, most were 1 3/4, one was 1 11/16.
    You can get either
     
  8. GGinMP

    GGinMP Silver Supporting Member

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    I had a Collings OM2HG with 1 3/4", but that was listed at the time as a custom option and not standard. I liked it, but don't think 1 11/16 would have made me like the guitar any less.
     
  9. Alex335

    Alex335 Member

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    I have an OM 1 with those specs, it sounds good to make coffee ads or to get very clean sounding recording... Not my favorite guitar sound wise but the neck/action/playability feels so good, makes me want to play for hours, to bad it lacks a little bit of meat and sound a lil generic sometimes. I guess I realy like 1 3/4 tough
     
  10. Crowder

    Crowder Dang Twangler Silver Supporting Member

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    I have an OM1 Short Scale with the 1.75 nut and it fits me like a glove. I love a shorter scale so I can do fingerstyle or flatpicking on the same box.

    That said, the Julian Lage signature OM has a 1-11/16 nut and people say it also feels perfect, maybe owing to the more vintage shape of the neck.

    I think Collings make as many OM's with the wider nut as with the "standard" nut width.

    I also think their standard width for D-styles is different, maybe 1-23/32?

    String spacing at the nut is only one part of the equation which also includes neck size/shape and how rolled the edges might be. My last guitar was a Martin OM-18V with the wider nut and a very chunky neck, and over time I learned that wasn't the right combo for me.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019
  11. rowdyyates

    rowdyyates Supporting Member

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    1 11/16 is standard across the Collings line, except for their slot head guitars, which are 1 7/8.
    1 3/4 and 1 23/32 are options.
     
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  12. Frozen Rat

    Frozen Rat Gold Supporting Member

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    I tend to search around for 0 and 00 guitars and I have noticed that most of Collings guitars in that size have 1 13/16th nuts (at least at the sites I tend to search), so there's yet another size to add to Collings's range. I like a 1 13/16th nut better than a 11/16th nut.
     
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  13. rowdyyates

    rowdyyates Supporting Member

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    You are correct. I meant to say 1 13/16 rather than 1 7/8.

    Bad math day:D
     
  14. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Member

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    What would a 14 fret Martin OM/000 shaped guitar with a 25.4" scale length and 1 11/16" nut width be considered, designation-wise?
     
  15. davess23

    davess23 Member

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    My understanding is that the original Perry Bechtel OMs made by Martin were long scale and 1 3/4" neck width. That's how I prefer my OMs, and I consider shorter scale guitars with the OM body to be 000s, not OMs. But that's not how Collings, Santa Cruz, and other builders interpret it, and many people want the 1 11/16" width.

    How you perceive neck width depends on other stuff too, factors like fingerboard radius, neck thickness and contour, and string spacing. My Collings SJ has a 1 11/16" neck that just plain feels wider than it is, and I don't have any problems when I switch to it after playing the OM.
     
  16. DanR

    DanR Member

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    Considering it's a Martin, I would consider it an OM because of the 25.4" scale and it would probably be a "Custom Shop" model because of the 1 11/16" non-standard nut.
     
  17. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Member

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    I too, consider it an OM, but usually call it a 000/OM to my friends. :D

    This was not a "Custom Shop" model, but a true custom one-off that was ordered by someone in 2009. Many great and cool features on it, and it plays/sounds wonderful.
     
  18. TwoHandsTenThumbs

    TwoHandsTenThumbs Silver Supporting Member

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    Totally. My D1A and SJ are both 1 11/16”, but the SJ feels much more substantial in width, as well as depth (which, given the different profile, I get...)
     
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