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Combo Amp vs head and cabinet

Benbritt

Member
Messages
27
I've only ever owned combo Amps and now I'm looking to buy an orange amp and I was thinking about a tiny terror, what is the difference to buying a combo amp or a head and a separate cab? Advantages and disadvantages? Also how does the tiny terror compare to other 15 watt tube amps?
 

Gnarlly

Member
Messages
2,862
Portability is one of the main factors as heavier combos can be a pain to haul around. But, for whatever reasons, I seem to end up preferring combos, even if they can be big and heavy. They can sometimes be more "lively," rattling those tubes. I've read good things about the tiny terror but never tried one.
 

Serious Poo

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Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
7,151
I really like the ability to match up different heads and speaker cabs to get different sounds. Heads & cabs are a lot easier on the back than combo's, too.
 

bgh

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,977
My main two amps are combos. I wish that when I bought the Mark IV, I could have afforded to purchase a head and cabinet combination. But, the Mark IV combo alone pretty much wiped out my budget.

The Nomad combo was such a good deal that I jumped on it. In my bands in Connecticut, I played through a Marshall head and a Peavey 4x12.

I am indeed getting older (59) and the idea of lugging my Mark IV around is no longer appealing. Thankfully, my son enjoys helping me.
 

Guinness Lad

Senior Member
Messages
15,853
Used to be a combo guy, but I have to admit lighter weight and the ability to basically have a new amp by changing cabinets is a real nice thing.
 

geetarplayer

Member
Messages
1,131
A head/cab is way more convenient if you need to isolate and mic the speakers (if recording or running it backstage for low stage noise). If you put a combo in an ISO box, you have to run power to the box, and you have to run a fan to ventilate the box (which can make noise in the mic). Not so with head/cab. Make a 50 foot speaker cable, and put the mic'ed cab anywhere you want it, while the head is sitting right in front of you.
 

Multicellular

Member
Messages
8,013
I've only ever owned combo Amps and now I'm looking to buy an orange amp and I was thinking about a tiny terror, what is the difference to buying a combo amp or a head and a separate cab? Advantages and disadvantages? Also how does the tiny terror compare to other 15 watt tube amps?
Portability. Larger cabinet will tend to have a larger sound, combo OR head/cab. I guess also ease of trying different speakers, but unscrewing a speaker from most cabs isnt that hard anyway.

Guy in my old band had a Tiny Terror.

I'd say it has a nice sound for anything from crunch to full overdrive. Pretty loud for 15 w. What I don't like about it, is I'd say it doesn't ever really get totally clean. At least stock tubes. But I've heard that is true no matter what, I just dont have 1st hand experience with tube swaps.
 

Dr. Lo

Member
Messages
1,426
One is not necessarily more convenient than the other. For instance, if the weight of the combo is not an issue, then using a combo can reduce the number trips between your car and the stage/practice room. However, if weight is an issue, then head+cab is the way to go, assuming neither the head nor the cab is a monster.

Other potential benefits of head+cab:
- less rattling of tubes during loud performances
- easier to connect attenuator between amp and speaker
 




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