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Completely replacing electronics in a Les Paul Standard- value killer?

big mike

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
12,528
BB pro: unbalanced coils, degaussed rough cast A5. Many people like them and so do I.

BB pros come in pairs, one with reversed polarity. So the original PCB switching functionality can't be utilized with a regular pair of PUs.

People will use it as an argument to get a discount. You'll have to be prepared to wait for the right customer or restore the guitar with a new set of BB pros.
Reversed polarity is Easy. Just flip the magnet
 

LqdSndDist

Member
Messages
1,336
I would probably pass on something like that, rather than lower an offer. Even if I like the replacement choices they made, there's no way to know how professionally implemented they are. Could end up with a buggy guitar.

Not exactly rocket surgery, but you can pretty easily look in the cavity and see how the solder joints look etc.

not like every factory Gibson comes with perfect wiring anyways
 

dahctor

Member
Messages
138
You'd probably be better off keeping a guitar you have just the way you like it, otherwise you may be chasing that tone from something else you buy.
 

who...me?

Member
Messages
46
Upgraded wiring, pickups, etc wouldn't bother me. I'd be more interested in your soldering skills, and determining if the guitar was upgraded or molested. It wouldn't be hard to return a LP Standard to stock if needed.
 
Messages
642
I think most buyers want stock. Even as little as upgrading vintage machine heads to grovers turns off some buyers. Used market buyers are typically looking for a good deal on gear that is as close to new as possible. If you are lucky, you'll find someone that was going to do the pickup mod anyway, but for me not including replaced stock parts is a deal breaker.
 

PeterG

Member
Messages
628
I'd swap in another humbucker in place of the H90 before selling.
I think most people would be unfamiliar with a P90/bucker combo and would pass over it.
Standard 2-hum setup with redone regular wiring is more appealing to me than PCB and probably would be to others as well.
^This makes the most sense to me.
 

Kurt L

Member
Messages
4,825
1) The hit you take on resale has already been at least partially offset by the sale of the original pickups.

2) As a buyer, the original PCB is useless to me unless I want to buy Gibson pickups or install connectors myself on the pickups I choose. So it wouldn’t matter to me that you still have the PCB.

So yeah, I’d offer less than the going rate and walk away if you declined.

A bog standard Les Paul with swapped wiring is never going to be collectable anyway so it doesn’t matter.
I’ve always loved the phrase “bog standard.” Dunno why but it makes me smile...
 

twoheadedboy

Member
Messages
11,455
A year or so back, I bought (used) a 2016 LP Standard Mahogany top. It came equipped with the factory Burstbucker Pro pickups, and the PCB electronics with all the coil-splitting and other possibilities wired in with push-pull pots, etc. You know the setup.

Because I can't resist, I pulled everything out and put a combination of Porter pickup- the H90 (humbucker-sized P90) in the neck and a Porter Anthem PAF in the bridge. Replaced all the control wiring with a 50's setup and PIO caps. I've been thrilled with the result.

I think I know the answer here, which is to say (a) this isn't a particularly collectible guitar to begin with, and (b) some buyers will pass on a modified LP, some will be intrigued. I kept the PCB and pots, and sold the BB Pro pickups. I'm pondering selling the guitar to finance something else- and I'm curious what sort of opinions exist about what impact my mods are likely to have on the asking/selling price.
Irreversible mods will destroy the value of a guitar, but reversible mods usually won't. Yours are reversible, so you should be fine. If you really want, you can always buy a set of BB Pros and return the guitar to stock before selling it.
 

andyk

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,826
There's something really satisfying about ripping out all the junk Gibson Standard wiring and PCBs/pots, and starting fresh with shielded braded 50's wiring and quality pots! Sounds better too!
 

Silent Sound

Member
Messages
5,041
It might hurt the value. Here's the deal. You shortened the list of potential buyers by changing it up. So now you have one of two options: Either wait until a buyer who likes that setup better than stock comes around. Or drop the price so that more buyers will be interested in it.

So if you priced it like what you would if you didn't make any mods, then you might have to wait quite a bit longer for the right person to show up. Or you might get lucky. But odds are that you'll either have to deal with a longer wait, or a lower price.
 

RRfireblade

Member
Messages
2,894
Killer? Probably not a value killer. Narrow your market? Certainly. Take a hit on the "investment"? Most likely.

Personally I don't trust the way the factory does a lot of things, so I have no interest at all in something an individual has modded. Unless it's a killer deal, I'm not going to buy something that I'm already assuming I'm going to have to go in and fix the things that I've been fixed. :)
 

TP Parter

Member
Messages
1,045
I'd swap in another humbucker in place of the H90 before selling.
I think most people would be unfamiliar with a P90/bucker combo and would pass over it.
Standard 2-hum setup with redone regular wiring is more appealing to me than PCB and probably would be to others as well.
I'd go the opposite way, sell the HB, move the neck H90 to the bridge, and put a Staple or Dearmond clone in the neck. Advertise it as a budget R4 killer, and you'll get dudes with CS money in their hands looking at it like a great deal.

Only problem is then you will definitely not want to sell it. ;)
 

sunburst79

Member
Messages
1,310
I’m strange.

Every thing I pull from a guitar to mod it goes into a large Manila envelope with that guitars name on it. And I mean everything.

My 96 R9 has had everything upgraded except the tail piece bushings and stock tuners which are fine.

The rest of the stuff. Pots. Caps. Pickups. Buttons. Plastic all sits in the envelope. It’s a easier sale put back to stock. Unless someone is willing to pay me for the Dead Mint Club parts and the Antiquities and NOS bumble bees etc. I’d rather keep my upgrade parts for the next guitar. And I’m more than happy to make someone happy with the stock pots, lackluster 57 Classics. Somewhat funky plastics. Wired ABR and heavy tail piece.

I do this with everything. Even Squiers lol. Why give upgrade parts away. Let the next owner mod it thier way.

I’d not shy away from quality pots and rewiring. Pickups are more subjective and I expect the guitar to come with a pair. Unless the upgrade pickups are close to what I’d swap I’d prefer the stock ones. That makes it easy to put back to factory. Which most people find appealing.

The point was made that the sale of the stock pickups helps offset any price adjustments needed.

For me it’s basically a wash. It’s hard to pay extra for someone else idea of the perfect pickup when it doesn’t match your own. There are other middle of the road choices with more universal appeal and those would bump the price up a little not down.

I’d keep my eyes open for a steal of a deal on a set of stickers. At one time the market was flooded. And swap the whole system back in at sale time or throw it in for free as a deal sweetener. That evens the price up but you lose your upgrade investment. But if you liked the pickups in this guitar chances are you will like them in the next guitar. And you can always sell the upgrade pickups to offset any loss.

Right about the time I started playing a local jazz guy pulled the factory PAFs out of a dot neck 335. He got a couple hundred bucks for them which was a good price back in 1980. They where two raspy and he had my luthier buddy swap in a lower wound set of something.

One was a double white.

He was cautioned against swapping pups even back then and also advised to keep the originals.

Over the years I’ve often wondered if he regretted that decision.

You couldn’t give away a silverburst Les Paul at one time. You never know what will make a jump.

Vintage T Tops now bring big bucks. In the seventies and early eighties people could literally not rip them out fast enough. Go figure.
 

plaintopper

Member
Messages
1,432
A year or so back, I bought (used) a 2016 LP Standard Mahogany top. It came equipped with the factory Burstbucker Pro pickups, and the PCB electronics with all the coil-splitting and other possibilities wired in with push-pull pots, etc. You know the setup.

Because I can't resist, I pulled everything out and put a combination of Porter pickup- the H90 (humbucker-sized P90) in the neck and a Porter Anthem PAF in the bridge. Replaced all the control wiring with a 50's setup and PIO caps. I've been thrilled with the result.

I think I know the answer here, which is to say (a) this isn't a particularly collectible guitar to begin with, and (b) some buyers will pass on a modified LP, some will be intrigued. I kept the PCB and pots, and sold the BB Pro pickups. I'm pondering selling the guitar to finance something else- and I'm curious what sort of opinions exist about what impact my mods are likely to have on the asking/selling price.
I would say you’re looking at a wash, if you can find someone who wants a neck P90. It probably shrinks the market slightly.
 

vortexxxx

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,243
You could always try selling it as is and if it doesn't sell, get a pair of the original pickups (often cheap) and restore it. To some people other or better pickups is a bonus especially if it came with common pickups.
 

tonedover

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
5,636
if ur “thrilled” with the results then u dont need to worry about it....

as stated above, the lack of bbpros could affect you.
 

philiprst

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
738
As other have said, in retrospect you probably should have kept the original pickups to sell with the guitar if you wanted maximize your cash resale value. Having said that, you would have paid the opportunity cost of owning a guitar with pickups you didn't like if you didn't swap out the pickups and you got part of that lost resale value back by selling the original pickups.
 




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