Compressor. Help!

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by Julia343, Jul 13, 2008.

  1. Julia343

    Julia343 Member

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    I've had this pedal for quite a while. It's an Allums modded Boss CS-3. I can dial in my Delay, I can dial in my Flanger, my chorus, my reverb, my phaser, my acoustic simulator. I can even dial-in all four channels on a JVM. But can I dial in this thing? No. It's embarassing.:eek:

    Someone please explain how to do this. I know it's supposed to even out volume. I know what the "sustain" part does. But the rest? Not really.:bkw
     
  2. spakuloid

    spakuloid Member

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    I have the same compressor with the same mod and it is amp to amp with it. Sounds great on some and on others it sounds like ass. Compressor pedals are simple - if it sounds and feels good - use it. If not - dump it and don't look back. Analogman and Keeley compressors are very finicky with different amps as well - at least to me. Some amps - particularly high end tube amps - just don't need compressors out in front. Just my $.02
     
  3. Julia343

    Julia343 Member

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    Well that just shortened the pedal chain, and took some more stuff I'm not using out. I was using it for the final buffer before the amp, but now since I am actually using teh acoustic simulator I can use that for the final buffer. Thanks. I guess the JVM or the 6505+ fall into that category of tube amps.
     
  4. Moe45673

    Moe45673 Member

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    CS-3:

    Level - Volume

    Sustain - The amount of compression in the signal. FYI, compression, at its most simplest explanation, makes your quiet notes louder and your louder notes quieter. This is why it's called the "sustain" knob on the CS-3 (i.e. as your signal fades when you hold a note, the compressor keeps it at the same volume giving it a sustain-type of effect). If you think of compression as two parallel horizontal lines (the top line the loudest it will let a signal get to and the lower line the quietest), turning up the sustain knob will make the two lines come closer together.

    Attack - How long before the compression kicks in. For example, instead of having the compression kick in immediately, you can let it kick in a second later to keep your dynamics, if you feel it's necessary.

    Tone - Regular Tone knob. Counterclockwise means less treble, clockwise means more

    I like to use compressors transparently, as an always on type thing. What a compressor does for me is that I can pound away on some chords, and then play a riff or fingerpick some chords and my volume is not drastically different. You can imagine what a godsend this is in a band setting
     
  5. 89strat

    89strat Member

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    Try doing this;

    Turn the Sustain to 0 or off, tone at noon, attack at noon, then turn the level up high enough so that it is the same volume as when the pedal is off.

    Then ( I like to use the G string) pick an open string very light and then very hard while turning up the sustain. The goal is to get the sustain high enough so that the volume is the same whether you pick the string hard or lightly. In many compressor pedals that I've had including the dyna comp, boss cs-2, cs-3, and tone press, the sustain would be set at about 9:00 - 10:00. Anything higher and it starts to really squash the notes (not always a bad thing, just a matter of preference).

    Once you get the sustain dialed in, you can adjust the tone to taste and finally the attack. Compressors have a tendancy to cut off the high end. The tone knob should bring that back. However, if your sustain settings are minimal, this may not be an issue. The attack can add or take away some of the percusiveness.

    Try placing the compressor first in line. This should give you a nice evenness to your playing without squashing the hell of the notes and added sustain.
     
  6. Julia343

    Julia343 Member

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    It is by default first in line after my Decimator. I don't use any overdrives or distortions. The only thing I have before it is a Phase 90, and I've never used the two together. I can see the compressor coming in handy with pounding metal rhythms. I'll copy these last two posts into Notepad and stick them in my Gear folder. Thanks for the info. If anyone has anything to add please do.
     
  7. Moe45673

    Moe45673 Member

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    Quite the contrary. Distortion/fuzz/most overdrives naturally compress your signal, making a dedicated compressor all but useless (although compressors combined with some overdrives can have a certain magic). Aside from fuzz, nothing compresses quite like metal distortion.

    I think well set up compression can help almost any player out there in a performing/band context (practise time should, IMO, NEVER use compression, as it can become a crutch).
     
  8. 89strat

    89strat Member

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    I think well set up compression can help almost any player out there in a performing/band context (practise time should, IMO, NEVER use compression, as it can become a crutch).[/quote]

    I agree with that one.

    I find that when I practice without compression, I improve on my technique and dynamics, then I tend to be more comfortable with using less distortion live and my solos stand out more, instead of adding heaps of overdrive and compression to make things easier. And of course, when I add some overdrive and compression, I BURN!!! :dude
     

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