compressor PEDAL on SNARE OR KICK DRUM

Messages
841
Okay this sounds crazy and I want to try it. People use rack compressors all the time on drums. What it sound like to add a guitar compressor pedal on a snare drum or kick. I mean whats different about a compressor pedal and a rack compressor.

I know people use sansamps on drums sometimes.
 

speakerjones

Member
Messages
2,299
The biggest difference is that pedals operate at "instrument level" while rack comps operate at "line level". Could work though. I would suggest splitting the tracks, one dry, one effected.
 

fr8_trane

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,313
Okay this sounds crazy and I want to try it. People use rack compressors all the time on drums. What it sound like to add a guitar compressor pedal on a snare drum or kick. I mean whats different about a compressor pedal and a rack compressor.

I know people use sansamps on drums sometimes.

There are MASSIVE differences between most studio comps and pedal comps. The first one being i/o impedance which means you'd have to use a DI or re-amp box on both the send and return from your mixer to the pedal comp and back.

Pedal comps are obviously mono devices where many studio comps are stereo. So I wouldn't strap a pedal comp across a stereo drum buss for instance since it would collapse it to mono

Another major difference (leaving aside audio quality) is the level of control over the compression parameters. Pedal comps usually have only 1 knob to control all compression variables. Sustain is the typical label and it really just controls the compression threshold - everything else is fixed. A studio comp will have variable threshold, ratio, attack, release, and a maybe few others.

Typical pedal comps like the Ross/Dynacomps have a fixed short-medium attack (10-20 ms, maybe as much as 50 ms), fixed high ratio (maybe 10:1) and a fixed long unnatural release that pumps like a mutha. This would be terrible on sustained sounds like vocals, bass, whole mixes, strummed guitars, etc. However it might be really cool on a mono drum room mic to get a really lo-fi,crushed, unnatural pumping sound. Of course you still can't tailor the release to the tempo of the song like you would with a studio comp.
 

Animal Mother

Member
Messages
251
You would patch it in your AUX sends? Using a compressor before recording is pretty much useless if you record at 24-bit. I've had better results by putting a comp after recording.

Like other people said, your mixer is line level, and a pedal comp is "instrument" level so it wouldn't work as AUX send.
 

fr8_trane

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,313
You would patch it in your AUX sends? Using a compressor before recording is pretty much useless if you record at 24-bit. I've had better results by putting a comp after recording.

Like other people said, your mixer is line level, and a pedal comp is "instrument" level so it wouldn't work as AUX send.

I'm assuming the OP means compression during mixdown. It would be a nightmare trying to setup a pedal comp for tracking.


An aux send would be perfect for parallel compression or you could use a channel insert for traditional compression. Either way its line level and will need something to convert the impedance/level mismatch.
 

TAVD

Guitar Player
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
3,804
Using a compressor before recording is pretty much useless if you record at 24-bit.

I do it all the time. :dunno

I have some old mil-spec transformers that are perfect for going instrument to line and back. It makes this kind of thing easy to pull off. However, I've never used a comp pedal that's quiet enough for recording. I guess if you don't mind a little noise, the orange squeezer circuit would be a good one to try.
 

speakerjones

Member
Messages
2,299
Yeah, if you're just trying to get regular compression on your drums, any plug in or even a cheaper rack-mount will probably work better. But if you're looking to do weird things to make your drums sound more trashy, effected, or less like drums, I say try it.
 

Tubthumper

Member
Messages
107
I often take snare/kick/whatever out of Pro Tools, reamp using a Radial reamp box, pass through my Dan Armstrong Orange Squeezer, then into a valve amp cranked/miced. I then use this as a parallel track, blended with the dry source.

Orange Squeezer sounds great for this purpose - nice'n dirty.
 

fr8_trane

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,313
I do it all the time. :dunno

I have some old mil-spec transformers that are perfect for going instrument to line and back. It makes this kind of thing easy to pull off. However, I've never used a comp pedal that's quiet enough for recording. I guess if you don't mind a little noise, the orange squeezer circuit would be a good one to try.

+1.

Dynamic vocals are always compressed going into the box. Its not a matter of headroom but using real HW compression to level the vocals a bit before applying VST compression ITB. HW comps sound better to me and using multiple stages of compression usually sounds better than LOTS of compression from a single instance.
 




Top Bottom