Condensor Mic for LIVE use/recording with a modest sound system for Choir.....

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by michael.e, Apr 24, 2005.


  1. michael.e

    michael.e Supporting Member

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    Hey all,
    My fiance needs to purchase a couple of mic's for her choral program. She is a music teacher that has created a choral program at Santa Cruz City Schools. She is looking to purchase a decent pair, or a stereo condensor. What would you suggest? I generally use my cheapo Oktava up high on a mic stand and I get decent results for the groups. I run the sound for her concerts and play guitar accompaniment when needed.
    How large of a spread would a condensor set overhead generally reach?
    When would I need to add the second?
    What is the best way to combat feedback using a condensor that is set overhead?

    Bear in mind that this is a public school program so the price of items needs to be modest.

    Thanks,
    M.E.
     
  2. Hard2Hear

    Hard2Hear Member

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    A couple of omnis hung from overhead does an excellent job on a choir. I have used Earthworks TC30k's and really liked it. You can get something as cheap as a $20 Behringer ECM8000 that would actually do the job. Any small diaphragm omni condensor mic would work well. Just get a set of 2 of them and balance them in the center of the choir. Some people use large diaphragm mics in this application, but still an omni. Cheapest thing I can think of like that is something like the Studio Projects C-3, which has an omni mode switch.

    In case you didn't know, an omni will pick up sound from every direction, so it does not really matter how its pointed. Great for choirs.

    H2H
     
  3. OOG

    OOG Member

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    i love my Rode NT5's
     
  4. LSchefman

    LSchefman Supporting Member

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    Symphony orchestras and choirs have OFTEN been recorded with a simple pair of small diaphragm condensers such as your Oktavas.

    If it is for sound reinforcement and not recording, the need for very high end ones decreases, but I wouldn't hesitate to use the Oktavas, or the Rodes that OOG mentions, for the purpose of recording.

    Modest price isn't a problem.
     
  5. michael.e

    michael.e Supporting Member

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    Wow! Thanks for all the replies guys! I appreciate the info.

    So next question then, What is the best, most effective way to combat feedback in sound re-inforcement applications using my Oktava or the like?
    Bear in mind that I am a bit of a neophyte when it comes to this stuff, but I am learning!

    Thanks again to all.
    M.E.
     
  6. lookslikemeband

    lookslikemeband Member

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    My best answer (not knowing the room or circumstances) is mic placement.......

    Keep them "ambient" in the truest sense.... i.e. keep them equidistant from the sound source.... and keep them parellel to each other to avoid any phase cancellation, which shouldn't be too much of a problem in this case..

    Good luck!!!

    Lance
     
  7. jokerjkny

    jokerjkny Member

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    :dude

    love mine...

    loved it so much i got the stereo version, too, which is terrific for field recordings.
     

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