Confused about Relics and Resale

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Gurn, Dec 7, 2017.


Relic owners - how do you treat your guitars?

  1. 1. Make your own dings and dents. That's the point.

    41 vote(s)
    56.9%
  2. 2. Keep it close to the new condition it arrived in.

    31 vote(s)
    43.1%
  1. Dr. Tinnitus

    Dr. Tinnitus Member

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    New parts are new parts, regardless of how they look.
     
  2. rsm

    rsm Member

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    don't know, don't care, about relics. I dig and buy new/pristine guitars whenever possible.

    I rarely sell guitars, over the last several years 19 guitars in, 1 out (sold), 1 returned due to damage during shipping.

    YMMV
     
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  3. Bluplirst

    Bluplirst Supporting Member

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    Try not to bleed on it too much.
     
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  4. bobeau

    bobeau Member

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    In FS listings it's common to see CS relic guitars described as "mint - no additional wear beyond the relic'ing". Seems like something that anyone could claim as it can't be verified.

    I'm not sure how I feel about that. I would think if I were in the market for one, esp. say an early Cunetto, I would appreciate some real mojo mixed in with the synthetic for balance.
     
  5. stevieboy

    stevieboy Clouds yell at me Gold Supporting Member

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    I tend to keep my 335 in a case, because Gibsons are more fragile in general especially the headstocks being more prone to damage. Not too concerned about scratches or dings. I’d prefer not to get those but they are tools after all. Beautiful tools, but still tools, and a few bangs here and there and they’re still just as beautiful to me. Still, I take reasonable care with all my guitars, including a couple of Relics.
     
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  6. RolandKorg

    RolandKorg Supporting Member

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    Seems like a sincere question.

    If i were to buy a road worn or relic'd guitar, i'd pretty much only be looking for 'damage' — something that looked like it was banged or broken or mistreated. If it's a Road Worn Fender, you probably have an idea what they looked like coming from the factory. If i saw something that looked 'excessive' beyond that, like if the owner just didn't treat the instrument with respect, or if he contrivedly tried to relic it further, i probably wouldn't be interested. But, a 'natural' evolution of the factory relic would be cool, up to a point. I'm not into guitars that look like swamp rescues or burn victims.

    Realistically, all of this conversation has to do with the tastes of the buyer, and with guitar players, that's an open, crazymaking book.
     
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  7. rsm

    rsm Member

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    relics are silly. IMO

    there, I said it! :p

    YMMV

    enjoy them if you dig them; your money, do what you want :)
     
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  8. Gurn

    Gurn Silver Supporting Member

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    FWIW, the guitar arrived in a box today. I won't open it until tomorrow because of the cold weather. But I've played one of these road-worn Jazzmasters and it was a nice instrument except for the dings and scrapes.

    I got a really good price on this one. If it's not as good as the one I played - I'll send it back. I didn't care about the relicking. I just didn't understand how a relic'd guitar was categorized.

    Maybe my blood stains will increase the value. I could advertise it as:

    That's what confuses me. New condition means how it was put in the box after Fender workers had taken paint scrapers and sandpaper to it to make it look like a used guitar.

    $799 for a Mexican Jazzmaster was a good price. They're normally $1024 or more.
    (But look for the prices to fall next year on this model.)
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2017
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  9. bonchie123

    bonchie123 Supporting Member

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    Finished guitars are silly. Let's all just play plain slabs of wood with pickups instead :)
     
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  10. ford

    ford Member

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    I treat my guitars well.. even the relics... but it is nice not worrying about any minor scratches on them..of course I don't want to break anything.. but a well done relic just feels and looks really good.

    Both of mine are early Fano models made in Pennsylvania by the man himself.

    GREAT guitars.

    I understand people not liking them. No problem there. I don't understand people complaining about them. Just don't buy one.

    For my last two guitars one was a relic and one was a custom purchase in brand new mint from the one person shop shape.
    Both are great guitars and I'm happy to own them.
     
  11. Axe Arsenal

    Axe Arsenal Member

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    What? No pics in this thread ?
     
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  12. MrGuitarhack

    MrGuitarhack Member

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    I don't think normal wear will effect the used price of a relic'd guitar unless the wear and tear is excessive or unusual.
     
  13. daacrusher2001

    daacrusher2001 Silver Supporting Member

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    I think it was Ron Kirn who commented in one of the 5000 relic threads on TGP - "relics are nothing more than a fashion statement" - I think it's pretty true. They have been fashionable for awhile. Just like relic jeans, aged furniture, etc...

    I have one lightly relic'd K-Line - swore I'd never get a relic, but honestly, I love this guitar, has a few chips around the edges. It's light, plays great, and it looks kinda cool with a slightly worn in look.
     
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  14. ronmail65

    ronmail65 Supporting Member

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    I'm kind of torn on this issue... If I get a nice looking guitar, I don't want to beat it and there's a greater chance of that if I'm gigging with it. So, a few more nicks or scratches on a relic, and who knows? Plus, I can resell a relic as a 'relic' and it's not really considered a damaged guitar. So I can see a practical angle for the relic purchase. The other angle is that a relic'd guitar can have some instant mojo (even if it is cosmetic and faux).

    That said, I don't own a relic and I like the idea of breaking in a guitar on my own.
     
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  15. jpage

    jpage Silver Supporting Member

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    I feel the same way about red guitars. Just stupid.
     
  16. jerrycampbell

    jerrycampbell Member

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    Fret wear is the difference between a new and used relic.
     
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  17. 67super

    67super Member

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    That nails it, I should have said that in my post. Frankly fret wear is the big deal on any used guitar that is otherwise sound and playable.
     
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  18. grumphh

    grumphh Member

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    However, it is very likely that the guitar in question has almost never been played - i mean, who is the target demographic for relics - gigging guitarists or affluent collector types who think that guitars that look like those of their heroes from 40 years ago are cool - and would never subject them to any wear and tear beyond opening the case carefully when another collector visits?

    Most of them will be as well kept as Nigel Tufnels "don't even look at it" guitar, because this carefully preserved relic will finance the next purchase of an even more realistic relic by a new and hot maker... Provided you can sell it before your guitars logo goes out of fashion with the real relic connoisseurs...
     
  19. Nasty troll

    Nasty troll Member

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    Never gave it much thought, I actually have guitars that are over 50 years old, And to be honest they don't look near as bad as those ones you can buy artificially beat up
     
  20. mvsr990

    mvsr990 Supporting Member

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    Lots of people piling on with the standard "oh boy another relic thread."

    There's a different question here, though, and it's about how used relic buyers judge condition. Come on, it's pretty funny when a relic is sold as LIKE NEW or MINT.

    I'd say that people buying relics would only care about something well out of the ordinary - a broken headstock, big gouges, wonky electronics, cracks. Short of that, additional character isn't going to count against you.

    Possibly different with an assembly-line relic like the Road Worns, anything new is going to be noticeable because they're all so similar.
     
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