Constantly Learning The Same Lesson Again...

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by dsmc80, Dec 23, 2009.

  1. dsmc80

    dsmc80 Member

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    I love my amps, guitars and a few choice pedals. They sound great and they give me the tones I want. However, every couple of months I start GASing for pedals based on some crazy hype I read around the net. I end up buying a bunch and adding them all to my board. Then I waste time screwing around with them instead of just playing. Eventually, I realize that I've gone through this before and I rip all of the useless pedals off of my board.

    I'm not a professional musician. I'm a professional computer engineer who loves to play guitar and record music. I don't need 100 pedals (even though my stock pile is now up to ~40). Does anyone else go through this?...Where you realize that all of the gear choices sometimes gets in the way of you just playing and having fun? Alright, rant off. :facepalm
     
  2. guitbeef

    guitbeef Member

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    Yeah, I've gone through that. Sometimes I'm down on myself for getting wrapped up in that, but then I realize that some of my "keepers" came from those buying phases. So some good can definitely come of it. I try to have a balance these days- I know what works for me too, but I still check something new out once in while. I just don't "swing for the fences" anymore with trying to replace everything at once.
     
  3. Flyin' Brian

    Flyin' Brian Member

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    Absolutely. Although I have a small board with very few pedal and love the sound of it, there's something quite liberating about taking a guitar, cord and amp to a gig. It's also much more musically challenging for me.
     
  4. stratovarius

    stratovarius Supporting Member

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    Isn't contantly learning the same thing usually referred to as 'not learning'? :D
     
  5. jaimo

    jaimo Member

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    Pro's, semi-pro's and hobbiests all go thru this at one time or constantly.
    Man..when I think of the pedals I've gone thru, it really pisses me off. But there have been some pedals, guitars, etc. that have made it worth while.

    But you're right...it's the feeling of time wasted testing and not playing that haunts you. I've only recently started to draw the line. Realized I don't have the capacity or inclination to sort thru a ton of junk to make music happen. You've got to stop, at least for break, some time.

    So, take a break. Forget about the latest and greatest...whatever it is. There's no condition of the Gear Page that says you have constantly BUY gear to participate in the forum or most especially make your music.
     
  6. Jazztone

    Jazztone Member

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    Really? I wish some one would have told me that long ago!
     
  7. porterfield

    porterfield Silver Supporting Member

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    I TOTALLY grasp where your coming from. And as we all know, tone is subjective, it also seems in the pedal business PRICE is subjective. Do I really need 20/$500+ tone bender clones??? I guess I chalk it up like this, whatever continues to draw your excitement, indulge. Every time I get that new tone bender in the mail I am inspired to explore again. GAS, PAS, and lets not forget about ASS can be a beautiful thing!!!
     
  8. WailinGuy

    WailinGuy Member

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    There's one rule in particular that has helped me (whenever I remember to follow it, but I usually do nowadays):

    Don't be an early adopter of a newly-released pedal or other piece of gear, even if the initial reviews are all positive. I find it's best to wait 6 months or more. Usually, by then, if the gear is really not all that great or different from other stuff that's out there, it will become apparent. Once the initial hype is gone, there will be more negative or lukewarm reviews, and you'll have a better sense about whether or not that item will work for you.

    A great example of this is my purchase of the Kingsley Jester tube overdrive/preamp pedal. Initial reviews were overwhelmingly positive (almost over-the-top), but I was leery because of the cost and the fact that I'd been through many tube-based ODs over the last 20 years, and none were anywhere near satisfactory. But after about 6 months or so, the highly complimentary comments I continued reading here at TGP told me that this product was probably truly exceptional and worth trying out. So I got on the waiting list, eventually received the pedal, and have been very happy with it. (Now it seems like it was a bargain.)

    Another advantage to waiting is that you'll have a better chance of finding a used pedal. Even if you don't like it, at least you won't lost much turning it around.
     
  9. dsmc80

    dsmc80 Member

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    That is true that on occasion I have found something really spectacular, which does make things worth it.
     
  10. 89strat

    89strat Member

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    I have about 6 or 7 flangers all lined up in front of my amp trying to decide which to add to my board, along with the several boost pedals.....I'm bored while my band is taking time off for the holidays. And that means I get to try out new gear. Of course, I'll try everything, then put it all back up on ebay, at a loss, and go back to the same set up I've been using for the past several years.

    I should really just be practicing. The audience knows a good song and recognizes good guitar playing. Nobody's listening to make sure my RAT has the proper chip in it or that my delay isn't analog, or for bucket brigades, or that I'm using a phaser instead of a flanger, etc.....

    Just plug your guitar straight into your amp, and appreciate the natural, non-effected tone.
     
  11. Reckedtrek

    Reckedtrek Member

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    No. That's where the remembering part comes in. Learning is easy- remembering is hard.
     
  12. ELA

    ELA Member

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    I hear ya. I was kinda there but then I accepted the fact that for me, this is a hobby and all hobbies cost money. Whether it be a guy trying new tires and swapping engines on his RC car or a photography guy purchasing new lenses to try out, or maybe more accurately the painter who tries different brushes and canvas', they're just enjoying trying new things to get different or maybe sometimes better results.

    I like trying new pedals to get new sounds. Keep in mind I don't run out and buy every pedal that comes along or is hyped, only when I am ready to try something new. Plus I get a small joy when I come across a real keeper.

    Like you I do not play professionally either. I am a data network engineer who loves to have fun playing. I would say stop beating yourself up over it and accept it. You have a hobby. :D
     

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