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Contemporary jazz combos with two guitarists. Are there any?

Mobass

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
613
Been getting into some jazz phrasings lately. Nothing crazy. Just jazz chord melodies, a little jump blues. This is new territory for me so pardon the lack of knowledge. Are there any/many twin guitar jazz combos out and about today? Most that I've seen/heard are a single guitarist ensemble. Something like the brilliant Concord recordings with Herb Ellis and Joe Pass w/ Ray Brown and Jake Hanna.
 

splatt

david torn / splattercell
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
26,458
that regular group with kurt rosenwinkel & tim motzer, "bandit 65".
 

tribalfusion

Member
Messages
7,579
John Patitucci's Electric Guitar Band features Adam Rogers and Steve Cardenas.

Lost Tribe was Adam Rogers and David Gilmore.

Paul Motion's band had Cardenas and Ben Monder together.

There's the Sco and Metheny album and tour.

Bass Desires with Scofield and Frisell

Sco's tour with Mike Stern (both are on Mike's Play album and of course on several Miles cds and bootlegs)

Jimmy Herring with Tom Guarna in Lenny White's group.

Jeff Richman has an album called Fingerpaints which features Stern and Scott Henderson among others

Truth in Shredding features Holdsworth and Gambale.

Carlton and Ford have several projects/recordings together

Louis Winsberg and Sylvain Luc have a nice album together

John Abercrombie and Sco did a great album together in the 80s

Mike Stern and Lee Ritenour had a project together

Steve Khan and Larry Coryell recorded together

Joe Diorio and Mick Goodrick did a great album together.

John Pisano's guitar night in LA features a lot of players and there's a live album featuring many of them.

Bireli Lagrene with Jim Grandcamp had a group.

This should get your started
 

splatt

david torn / splattercell
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
26,458
oh, sorry; "contemporary", but "nothing crazy". wrong thread!
i's nuking a couple of posts & abandoning ship.
 

teleman1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
15,369
My friend from LA Steve Schuffman took lessons from Joe Pass when we were teens. Steve was awesome as a Jazz player early on. He did play with Joe at a performance at LA valley College and Joe asked him to play with him at Donte's I had him Jam with Stan Sorenson here In Phoenix. And I have another friend who plays Brazilian Jazz on classical guitar and I saw them play and was floored how good good can get, at least for me. If you live in LA I think Steve is still teaching.
 

tribalfusion

Member
Messages
7,579
From the OP:



I guess you're right ... Holdsworth and Gambale are just like Pass and Ellis. So sorry to have upset your delicate constitution.

Oh wait! The OP's example recordings were from the 70's and stylistically consistent with my suggestion. What's that? Joe Pass died in 1994? Hmmmmmm ... Maybe my suggestion isn't quite that idiotic after all.

You can make as many dumb jokes as you like but Holdsworth and Gambale are part of the shape of contemporary jazz guitar, as are all the others I mentioned and there was a broad range in there if you bothered to pay attention.

The common thread to all my examples? Even the oldest players I mentioned are relevant to contemporary jazz guitar. George Barnes is not, no matter how ridiculous an argument you want to make about it.

The OP was familiar with older exponents and asked for more contemporary ones therefore I gave him a range of contemporary ones and it also illustrates just how broad contemporary jazz guitar has become today.

You simply gave him someone as old or older than the people he already knew. I'll let others draw their conclusions on whether it was idiotic in a thread about contemporary guitar duos to name a person born in 1921 and who died 40 years ago and who played about as old timey a style as one could imagine.
 

apalazzolo

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,437
You can make as many dumb jokes as you like but Holdsworth and Gambale are part of the shape of contemporary jazz guitar, as are all the others I mentioned and there was a broad range in there if you bothered to pay attention.

The common thread to all my examples? Even the oldest players I mentioned are relevant to contemporary jazz guitar. George Barnes is not, no matter how ridiculous an argument you want to make about it.

The OP was familiar with older exponents and asked for more contemporary ones therefore I gave him a range of contemporary ones and it also illustrates just how broad contemporary jazz guitar has become today.

You simply gave him someone as old or older than the people he already knew. I'll let others draw their conclusions on whether it was idiotic in a thread about contemporary guitar duos to name a person born in 1921 and who died 40 years ago and who played about as old timey a style as one could imagine.
You are, of course, correct. Thank you for improving me.
I hope you and the entire GEAR PAGE community will accept my sincerest apology and my official withdrawal of my prior jazz guitar suggestion. Further, I have written to George Barnes' publisher and formally requested that all evidence of his existence be expunged since he is no longer relevant to the world.

Perhaps I can make amends by trying again. Please find below a better suggestion including two jazz guitarists who are both living. I feel this example is particularly relevant since one of these guitarists is playing a new kind of mini jazz guitar. It has 8 strings that are tuned way up. Further, recent advances in technology have resulted in carbon-free green guitars (like both of these) that do not need to be plugged into low-efficiency amplifiers. I feel this is not only contemporary but actually the future of jazz guitar duos.

 
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Dave Wakely

Member
Messages
1,863
Leni Stern's Closer to the Light album with Wayne Krantz is an overlooked gem. As is Coryell's duet album with Emily Remler. My memory may be faulty, but I think some of Enrico Rava's albums have more than one guitarist too?
 

tribalfusion

Member
Messages
7,579
You are, of course, correct. Thank you for improving me.
I hope you and the entire GEAR PAGE community will accept my sincerest apology and my official withdrawal of my prior jazz guitar suggestion. Further, I have written to George Barnes' publisher and formally requested that all evidence of his existence be expunged since he is no longer relevant to the world.

Perhaps I can make amends by trying again. Please find below a better suggestion including two jazz guitarists who are both living. I feel this example is particularly relevant since one of these guitarists is playing a new kind of mini jazz guitar. It has 8 strings that are tuned way up. Further, recent advances in technology have resulted in carbon-free green guitars (like both of these) that do not need to be plugged into low-efficiency amplifiers. I feel this is not only contemporary but actually the future of jazz guitar duos.


It's one thing to casually say something clueless as you did initially but doubling down on it repeatedly...

George Barnes. Contemporary jazz guitar. Died 40 years ago and born in 1921. Just. Let. That. Sink. In.

He may be relevant to many things but not a thread about contemporary jazz guitar so sarcastically pretending that you need to contact his publisher merely highlights your own issues.

Contemporary jazz guitar in the 40s or 50s? Sure.

Otherwise, I and several others have made relevant suggestions for the OP for the century in which we currently live.
 

tribalfusion

Member
Messages
7,579
A few more albums which come to mind:

John Abercrombie and Ralph Towner (several albums)
Bireli Lagrene and Sylvain Luc
Gene Beroncini and Jack Wilkins
Mike Stern and Eric Johnson (to some degree)
David Becker and Joe Diorio
Wolfgang Muthspiel and Mick Goodrick Live at the Jazz Standard
Jesse van Ruller and Maarten van der Grinten

And a few interesting videos (no albums with these):

Scott Henderson and Peter Mazza

Bill Frisell and John Pizzarelli

Mike Moreno and Julian Lage

Pat Metheny and Mick Goodrick (also check them out on albums with Gary Burton)

Gilad Hekselman and Yotam Silberstein

Jack Wilkins and Peter Bernstein
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0OwrcptCtg
 
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tribalfusion

Member
Messages
7,579
Well, the OP "liked" my suggestion so you are alone in tilting at windmills on this.

Have a nice day.

You continue to insist that George Barnes, who died 40 years ago and wasn't really relevant to contemporary jazz guitar even then, should be thought of as relevant to it in 2016.

That, my friend, is tilting at windmills.

The OP appears to be a congenial person who perhaps gave you a like for participating. I for my part simply wondered initially how someone would arrive to the conclusion that a guy born in 1921 would be relevant but after several clueless posts from you, I get what kind of person would do that.

Tilting at windmills indeed.

Have a nice day, Don Quijote.
 






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