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Controlling hollowbody feedback

jdogric12

Member
Messages
2,506
Years ago I tried using my "real" Casino on a loud gig and had that awful feedback problem so I never tried that again. I've since acquired a weird custom Casino-like guitar with questionable legitimacy (almost certainly a "faker") but it has a center block. I'd be curious to know how it does in a similar scenario.
 

scott944

Member
Messages
3,904
Certainly this would be the first place to try and address your problem. Is this the stock Epiphone Casino, the cheaper model, or the Inspired By or the Elitist? If it's the stock model, then it is loaded up with cheap electronics and you could easily benefit from upgrading those.

If it's the other models, then it might not be so necessary.
My first thought, as well. Beyond that, the elegant solution is to have a luthier install a sound post - a piece of wood (dowel or small block) jammed between the top and back, generally under the bass side of the bridge. Friction fit, so completely reversible.
 

LaceSensor1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,953
Watch some Phish shows.

Trey is always very particular about where he stands and the angle of his guitar. On solos when he wants feedback, he will twist his body to do so.

Also he is always "controlling" the feedback with the volume knob. Sometimes it gets out of hand and he has to really kill the feedback by rolling out of the note completely.
 

Mincer

Member
Messages
4,539
I recently got a full hollow body, no bracing, completely hollow, and it feeds back horribly. It's the low notes that cause it to feedback very quickly and it's a very unpleasant noise. It's all over the D, A & E strings. I am using Seymour Duncan Stag Mag pickups, which maybe I need to switch to '59s? I can't even hold out a bar chord without it going into uncontrollable low end "woo" feedback sound. I've stuffed it with a shirt, which helped a little, but not nearly enough. Bummer too because I had it custom built. Maybe a hollow body just isn't for me?
59s will make it worse, as they have a pretty big bass. I think it is a matter of turning down, and getting out of the direct beam of the amp.
 

mannish

Member
Messages
9,498
Spray foam from home depot will fill it in nicely and also keep the wires secure....spray until the body is full, then trim the excess bulging out of the F holes, input jack and around the knobs. Get a sharpie that is close to same color as the guitar & use it to color the foam in the f holes - BAM no feedback
 

GrungeMan

Member
Messages
6,439
Spray foam from home depot will fill it in nicely and also keep the wires secure....spray until the body is full, then trim. the excess bulging out of the F holes, input jack and around the knobs. Get a sharpie that is. close to same color as the guitar & use it to color the foam in the f holes - BAM no. feedback
Sorry but this is not the answer. One may not be able to change the pots, pickups, pickup switch or plug jack now and...too much foam may cause the top or back to separate from the body sides, risky!
 

movingmatter

Member
Messages
194
Thank you all so much for the responses, very helpful and encouraging. I am a big Trey Anastasio fan, probably my biggest influence as a guitarist, hence why I finally got a hollow body guitar. What I am wondering is, does my guitar feedback more easily and in a non-musical way vs other hollow body's or even Trey's guitar, a Languedoc, or is this how most hollow body's react?

Our band plays fairly dynamically, volume wise, but yes, as the band gets louder, the feedback is harder to tame. I will keep experimenting with amp position and possibly that balloon trick, which sounds very interesting. The luthier has agreed to put in sound posts but we've tried other things first. I started with 1 t-shirt stuffed, which helped, but was still uncontrollable, then 2 t-shirts, which completely packed the inside of the guitar, and it still fed back. This is what confused me? How is it feeding back when it's completely stuffed?

In regards to Trey, is he really on top of the feedback, all night long, always considerate of his standing position and his volume / gain? I know the guy is a Jedi, and am now realizing how much more of a Jedi he is:) Thanks so much for your input!
 

sleewell

Member
Messages
10,378
I brought my gretsch hollow body to practice a few weeks ago hoping it would work because I really love that guitar. sadly it did not work. no matter where I stood there was nothing I could do. I guess we just play too loud. I move around a lot too so finding one spot and standing there like a tree all set is not an option even if that had worked.

sweet guitar, but I just will have to wait until I'm older and don't play super loud rock n roll I guess. I wrote one of my favorite jazz songs on that guitar and its really fun to play.
 

bigEbeer

Member
Messages
1,117
Thank you all so much for the responses, very helpful and encouraging. I am a big Trey Anastasio fan, probably my biggest influence as a guitarist, hence why I finally got a hollow body guitar. What I am wondering is, does my guitar feedback more easily and in a non-musical way vs other hollow body's or even Trey's guitar, a Languedoc, or is this how most hollow body's react?

Our band plays fairly dynamically, volume wise, but yes, as the band gets louder, the feedback is harder to tame. I will keep experimenting with amp position and possibly that balloon trick, which sounds very interesting. The luthier has agreed to put in sound posts but we've tried other things first. I started with 1 t-shirt stuffed, which helped, but was still uncontrollable, then 2 t-shirts, which completely packed the inside of the guitar, and it still fed back. This is what confused me? How is it feeding back when it's completely stuffed?

In regards to Trey, is he really on top of the feedback, all night long, always considerate of his standing position and his volume / gain? I know the guy is a Jedi, and am now realizing how much more of a Jedi he is:) Thanks so much for your input!
Yes, Trey is constantly fiddling with his vol/tone and coil splits in order to tame the feedback. You'll hear him struggle in the first few shows with the marshall's on fall tour 16
 

Average Joe

Member
Messages
11,543
This is why solidbodies and semis were invented. As much as i love my Hamer Newport there are gigs where it wont fit in for feeding back, and it's less hollow than the 330.

Horses for courses
 

swiveltung

Member
Messages
14,499
Getting out from in front of the amp can help, but hard to do and hear yourself in the band mix. My best advice is to stuff the F holes with foam rubber.
 

Scott Miller

Member
Messages
7,366
The only hollow body that I have that squeals has micro-phonic pickups. Nasty. My other hollow bodies don't squeal, they roar, which is truly feedback. Heck, I can feel it; it's like wrestling a German shepherd.
 

mannish

Member
Messages
9,498
Sorry but this is not the answer. One may not be able to change the pots, pickups, pickup switch or plug jack now and...too much foam may cause the top or back to separate from the body sides, risky!
I would definitely recommend using the minimal expanding foam otherwise your semi-hollow will go to full on big assed hollowbody which is another neat trick....If you have a semi & would like for it to be a thicker hollow body style then use full expanding foam.
 

GrungeMan

Member
Messages
6,439
I would definitely recommend using the minimal expanding foam otherwise your semi- hollow will go to full on big assed hollowbody which is another neat trick....If you have a semi & would like for it to be a thicker hollow body style then use full expanding foam.
:huh What are those over-sized Mexican guitars called?
 

Flotsam

Member
Messages
185
A sound post is an easy fix as suggested above. However it will change the guitars tone somewhat. You may like the change or not? It is removable, but a bit of a PITA.
I can't imagine using a full hollowbody at rock volumes. I can only think those that do have either found a guitar that doesn't feedback too readily or have foam/soundposts/whatever installed to get the guitar to the point where it works as they need.
Try the balloons. It's an easy thing to experiment with as a starting point.
Personally I didn't like F hole plugs. They really dulled the tone of my guitars and looked butt ugly on such beautiful guitars :)
 

GerryJ

Member
Messages
4,934
The more a hollowbody is designed as a true fine sounding acoustic gtr - thin resonant carved spruce top instead of thick laminate - the more it will roar the wolf tones.

But keep in mind, although HBs feed back at relatively lower volume, if you're not using earplugs you're slowly losing your hearing without realizing it.
 

Jon Silberman

10Q Jerry & Dickey
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
41,001
I use Doug's Plugs (dougsplugs.com) F-hole covers and they stop feedback from occuring without any discernable effect on tone. Doug has done some very informal testing and claims that the plugs actually benefit your clean tone a bit, but I haven't experienced that. They are quite effective in stopping feedback.
I just found out about Doug's Plugs and have contacted him about getting a set for my Bruton Universal Uppercut (I've started by emailing him to ask if he already has f-hole tracings for this model on hand so I can skip doing them myself beforehand).



For my '67 Hagstrom Viking 1, Phil Jacoby did a nice job of filling the holes with pieces of a black t-shirt.

 




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