Convince me to give a Floyd Trem another try

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Gallery, Mar 5, 2015.

  1. Gallery

    Gallery Supporting Member

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    I had a few of these back on the 80's and 90's and they always annoyed me.

    • Changing strings was a pain with more tools and time needed.
    • Alternate tuning weren't an option
    • Tuning in general seemed to be issue
    • More parts to break or lose

    In all fairness the ones that really gave me a hard time were licensed Floyds and not the real deal. I had a real one on a BC Rich that was the least temperamental.

    I didn't use the trem much, but when I did, it was nice to have.

    I'm looking at a Jackson Soloist now and trying to decide between Floyd or hard tail. Here are the options I've arrived at:

    • Stick to the hard tail that is proven to work for me
    • Buy a used USA Soloist with the real Floyd so if I still hate it I can flip it without taking a big loss
    • Buy a used cheap Asian made Soloist with the licensed Floyd to test the water and take very little loss if I flip it (could always swap it out for a real Floyd)

    My gut tells me to go with the hard tail, but there is a voice on my shoulder telling me to give the Floyd another chance.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Chill_Billy

    Chill_Billy Member

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    I could never get into Floyds
    Yes tuning was a pain and if it wasn't set up right you wouldn't be in tune for long.
    Unless you're really going to use it in your music, I would go hard tail and keep enjoying yourself.
     
  3. NC_Slater

    NC_Slater Member

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    i could do a great job convincing you not to give it another try.

    but i actually have had one guitar with a floyd rose that didn't get out of tune pretty much ever.

    it was this little Fernandes Strat copy i got in a pawn shop to gig with in college.

    So if you see a Fernandes with a floyd - it might not suck!
     
  4. Matt L

    Matt L Supporting Member

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    Skip the cheaper Floyds and make sure you get a top-quality German or Gotoh version. The lower-end imports or licensed versions are the only ones that ever give me problems. A good Floyd should be rock-solid and sound great.
     
  5. GermanCDN

    GermanCDN Member

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    Are you a full floating or dive only type? Reason I ask is that while I had a similar dislike for Floyds for a long time, I really enjoy them when they are decked, like on a Wolfgang, an Axis, or a MIJ SoCal. Might be worth a try with one of those.

    +1 on the real Floyds making a difference.
     
  6. s2y

    s2y Member

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    If changing tunings is necessary, try the Tremel No.

    I'd agree that changing the strings can be a pain compared to other guitars. I simply use Elixirs and change strings much less often.
     
  7. edsped

    edsped Member

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    Get a guitar with a good Floyd, meaning a German OFR, Gotoh, or Schaller. The Korean OFRs (FRT-1000) are good too, though I've heard of people having issues with them. I've used a bunch and they've always been as good as a German Floyd.

    If you end up not liking it for whatever reason, block it or sell it. If you don't plan on sticking with ONE tuning and (to a lesser degree) ONE string gauge, you're setting yourself up for frustration.

    Restringing is quick and easy if you just block the trem before you start removing strings. Just shove a AAA battery between the lock screws and the guitar, or wedge a plastic cavity cover under there or something.
     
  8. gimpyjoe

    gimpyjoe Member

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    sorry I can't help you. i'll never own another Floyd.
     
  9. s2y

    s2y Member

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    Something like the Ernie Ball Axis is set to lower pitch only, which would generally allow different gauges and tunings. I'd argue that it's generally better to set up most guitars in a single tuning/string selection and leave 'em alone.

    I don't block the trem when restringing. I restring one at a time and often put the ball end through the tuning peg and maybe give it 1-2 winds at most. I used to give them many winds on the tuning peg in case I broke a string at the bridge so I could keep using the string. Usually strings are toast at that point.
     
  10. Mr. Mukuzi O

    Mr. Mukuzi O Member

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    once you get the hang of getting them set up correctly there a re a pinch

    and are loads of fun.
     
  11. edsped

    edsped Member

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    True, flat mount Floyds are much less fickle than floating ones. Your "bag of tricks" is severely limited compared to a floating trem, though.

    I find restringing one at a time to be a lot slower. I like being able to go through all the different "steps" at the same time with all the strings. So I can loosen all the strings, unlock all the strings, clip all the ball ends off, lock all the new strings, wind all the new strings. Instead of having to go through the whole process 6 separate times. Plus I use Elixirs and normally clean my fretboard between string changes since they last so long.
     
  12. 59Vampire

    59Vampire Silver Supporting Member

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    I think you need to ask yourself if you need a twang bar or not.
     
  13. f550maranello2

    f550maranello2 Member

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    get one that is DIVE ONLY.. i have only 1 guitar that has a full floating trem its a Japanese strat with a gotoh floyd (the most stable guitar iv ever had, literally the stings are a year old and iv never had to turn the fine tuner knobs more than a quarter turn) the rest are all dive only and i love them.

    the floating floyd is something to get used to and a pain in the ass to work on..
     
  14. 59Bassman

    59Bassman Plank Cranker Silver Supporting Member

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    I've got a Charvel So Cal with a floating Floyd that I absolutely love. I don't find setting it up any more difficult than setting up one of my PRS trems (also floating). String changes do take a bit longer, but I'm not doing them all that often. I don't mess with alternate tunings, so that's not an issue for me.

    If you want a bar that will stay in tune no matter what you do to it, the Floyd is your ticket. If you just want something you can wiggle a bit without being too far out, there are strat units or the PRS that will get you there. If you truly want to mess with alternate tunings and need the fastest string changes possible, get a hardtail. Not that complicated.
     
  15. cratz2

    cratz2 Member

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    DO IT!


    Sorry... that's the best I've got. :dunno


    :p
     
  16. Mr. Mukuzi O

    Mr. Mukuzi O Member

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    pre internet: didn't care
    mid internet: hated floyds , hated skinny necks, hated graphics and pointy headstocks
    mid/post internet: bring on the pointy skinny Floyd action yeeeaaahawww
     
  17. HoboMan

    HoboMan Silver Supporting Member

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    I've had a few guitars with Floyds and LOVED them. Actually liked the Floyd more than the guitars so I ended up selling them.

    I always blocked mine for dive only. NEVER went out of tune. I could whammy the hell out of it all night and it stayed they stayed in tune better than my hardtails.

    Never understood the "Pain in the ass" to restring comment.
    I simply pulled the ball end thru the tuning peg and pulled it to the trem. Cut string, insert and lock.
    Play it for about 5 minutes to break the strings in and lock the nut.

    My only issue was that all the guitars I had them on had 25.5" scale necks and I prefer 24.75" scale necks.
    I'm thinking about getting the Floyd FRX and installing it on one of my Les Pauls.


    [​IMG]
     
  18. doc

    doc Member

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    No clear answer, but a couple of thoughts that may be useful:

    Don't assume that you can just swap another Floyd in - they come in several different spacings for the studs.

    Don't assume you'll take a bigger loss if you get the hardtail and resell - you're not the only one in this situation, and you'd only be selling to one person - it may well be to someone also looking for a hardtail shredder. I have 2 great Floyd shred machines I kinda wish were hardtails.

    I'd only go for the Floyd if you really want to do some of the stuff you can do with one - if you're not really wanting to add those tricks, stick with the hardtail.
     
  19. pieman8pie

    pieman8pie Member

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    Floyds can be quite temperamental based on my experience. I remember the first time I had to tune one. It took over an hour, and by the time I finished I was so frustrated I had to wait a few days to try the thing out.

    However, once I got into the swing of things the maintenance became less and less of a pain. Re-stringing became easier and quicker, tuning was less of a hassle. Every now and again it gets on my nerves, but I can live with the occasional problems. The biggest issue I have is that I can't change tunings, but I think everyone hates that aspect of them.

    I use it extensively in my playing, I feel like it adds a lot more versatility and options. It all depends on what you want it for and how much you plan on using it. If you are going to use it for here and there for a cool effect, I wouldn't get it, but if you want something to add a whole new edge to your playing, get it.

    Sustain can also be a problem with Floyds, since the strings only contact the wood through the two pivot points.

    It's all personal preference. The Floyd on my Chevelle Desolation DX-1 is one of the cheaper Asian models, but performs exceptionally well (despite the problems I have with it every now and again.) If it turns out you hate the tremolo, you could always block it, so it's not that big of an issue if that's the case.
     
  20. monty

    monty Member

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    Good timing OP, I'm struggling with this decision also.
     

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