Corded Impact Drill question

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Johnny Moondog, Apr 10, 2015.

  1. Johnny Moondog

    Johnny Moondog Member

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    I bought one on sale last week.

    7.5 amps.
    2200 RPM / 2700 BPM
    no accessories - no case.

    This week, same store has another one on sale - same brand (Mastercraft), but $10 cheaper.

    It has a case / accessories - but is 3.5 amps.
    specs say 0-3200 RPM / 0-4000 BPM

    I just wanted one to drill lag bolts, maybe change a tire, etc.

    Should I stick with the one i have, or return it for the other one ?

    I am thinking that 7.5 amps is way more powerful than the 3.5 amp drill, but the RPM/BPM thing is confusing me.

    I have never owned an impact drill before.

    Thanks :)
     
  2. mark norwine

    mark norwine Member

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    Ultimately, power is power.

    Stick with what you have.
     
  3. Guinness Lad

    Guinness Lad Silver Supporting Member

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    Current is a value to specify what the product can safely be run to, in most cases it is a marketing number. The problem with this type of thinking is many times marketing wants a number for competitive advantage only, people tend to think that speed of cut, amp rating, and all the other catch phrases are what matters.

    If you look at what the application is and have an idea of what capacity you need and the rate the tool should function you will get a better product. It's much like having a Ferrari to go grocery shopping.

    Personally I think so speeds are too fast and that you will probably just burn up bits. With hammer drills impact energy is more important because if there is little impact energy all you really have is a drill. One final point, do not run a concrete bit w/o making sure it's in impact mode, if you just turn it in a hole you will burn up the bit almost instantly. It cuts because of the impacts not the drilling.
     
  4. poolshark

    poolshark Supporting Member

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    I'd keep the more powerful model, as accessories tend to be more superfluous than anything. Maybe it's just my organizational skills, but if they're not sitting around taking up space, they're missing the one time I actually do need them. And FYI, you shouldn't be using an impact to change tires.
     
  5. Johnny Moondog

    Johnny Moondog Member

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    That was one of the main reason I bought it. Not a good idea ?
     
  6. Irreverent

    Irreverent Silver Supporting Member

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    Is it actually a drill, or is it an impact driver?
     
  7. Jonny Hotnuts

    Jonny Hotnuts Member

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    Every tire shop in the world uses them to install tires.
    It is not recommended to tighten lugs but most shops install the lugs with air impact and use a torque wrench to verify.

    There is zero reason not to use one to remove the lugs.



    The diff in tools you are looking at is that one is an electric impact wrench capable of removing/installing lag bolts or other large fasteners and the other is a 'clicker gun' that is a mini impact used to do small fasteners. The small ones have a female chuck with a slip collar that accepts insert type bits or 1/4" male. The bigger ones will have a male 3/8, 1/2 or larger for impact sockets.


    GOod luck.

    ~JH
     
  8. Rick Lee

    Rick Lee Member

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    Maybe too late now, but I use a cordless DeWalt impact driver for R&Ring my wheels. I just snug them up and use a torque wrench to manually set them. I hate dragging a power cable around.
     
  9. poolshark

    poolshark Supporting Member

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    Torque wrench would be safer/better. Over-torquing can trash your wheels or brake rotors, shear a stud, make cross-threading a lot quicker/easier, etc. Shops will use impact wrenches because they value the time, and while the decent ones use torque-limiting extensions to avoid over-torquing the nuts, even those aren't especially accurate. If you've got an extra two minutes on your own wheels, use a torque wrench. IMO, course.
     

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