Could someone please explain this technique?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by lgehrig4, Apr 16, 2008.

  1. lgehrig4

    lgehrig4 Silver Supporting Member

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    From watching videos I've noticed that a lot of fast players have their fingers positioned a certain way and they just slide that finger position to different positions on the neck.

    I don't see this too much with blues players, mainly shredders. It looks like an economical way to position your fingers, but what do I know?

    Anyway, this is what I see.

    1st finger - positioned anywhere on the neck
    2nd finger - one step up from 1st finger
    3rd finger - half step up form 2nd finger
    pinky - one step up from 3rd finger

    When I watch these certain players they just seem to slide this position effortlessly around. This is much different than the the players who mainly use only three fingers for fretting (omitting pink). I even see some players who use all four, but don't position them in this manner.

    Please explain this, because Iwould really like to understand and learn what is going on here.

    Thanks!
     
  2. brad347

    brad347 Member

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    It's sort-of a staple of classically 'correct' position playing.

    In other words, picture your 4 fingers on four adjacent frets, all in a neat little row. Now consider that your index finger can extend down an 'extra' fret, and your pinkie can extend up an 'extra' fret, giving you a span of 6 frets.

    Lots of guys just hold their hand in that position, with fingers 1 and 4 stretched to their 'extra' frets. Then they move that around.

    Additionally, thinking diatonically, there are no major or minor or diminished scales that contain 3 adjacent notes a half-step apart. So positioning your hand the way you describe will have your fingers ready to play something that is contained within some scale/key or other.

    Good observation!
     
  3. lgehrig4

    lgehrig4 Silver Supporting Member

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    Thank you. I'm gonna have to study the modes again and see if I can recognize the patterns and apply this fingering. Unfortunately I am a very visual thinker. Kind of a curse for someone who wants to play an instrument. I wish I could focus on just listening.
     
  4. brad347

    brad347 Member

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    It's not so much unfortunate that you're a visual thinker as it is fortunate that you're a thinker at all! ;)

    Good luck!
     
  5. TonyV

    TonyV Member

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    There is a very old little book by Alan Hanlon "Kruetzer for Guitar" that goes over proper technique as you mention , it does it with Kruetzer violin excersices.
    Perhaps you can find it on Alibris.com (used books) or on the net. There is no tab but string, fret and finger are notated with numbers above and below the staff. In the introduction he mentions the techniuqe of stretching the first finger down. Each etude concentrates on different types of movement, scalar, arpeggio, etc.
    No chord progressions or scales are indicated, it is a technique book.
     
  6. shredtheater

    shredtheater Member

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    Assuming i have understood what your saying; Its better that way, you have greater access and greater ability to stretch. Also each finger is the same distance from the fretboard so higher speeds are available. Also, it gives you the option to play 4 notes per string both chromaticallly and diatonically if you can stretch far enough.

    From a visulization point of view i cant see how it changes from any other technique. Technically though, you will have to get used to it.
     
  7. lgehrig4

    lgehrig4 Silver Supporting Member

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    Thanks! I'll have to look for this.
     

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