Cry Of Love/Rainbow Bridge

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
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22,591
I just ordered these CD's. I still have the original vinyl and an earlier import CD of Cry of Love. I can't wait to hear the 'new' versions that were just released. The mastering is supposed to be great sounding.
 

TopDog

"jumping the valence"
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,150
I've got my original copy LP of Cry of Love. In great shape.
 

StratoCraig

Member
Messages
3,216
Silly question, maybe, but I thought all the tracks on these old LPs were reissued in recent years on the CDs First Rays of the New Rising Sun and South Saturn Delta. What's the point of reissuing these old albums on CD?
 

Craig Allen

Member
Messages
2,205
Silly question, maybe, but I thought all the tracks on these old LPs were reissued in recent years on the CDs First Rays of the New Rising Sun and South Saturn Delta. What's the point of reissuing these old albums on CD?
Maybe Janie Hendrix is looking to buy a new house or something.
 

jammybastard

"I'm losing my edge, but I was there..."
Gold Supporting Member
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6,272
Silly question, maybe, but I thought all the tracks on these old LPs were reissued in recent years on the CDs First Rays of the New Rising Sun and South Saturn Delta. What's the point of reissuing these old albums on CD?
Yes.
They were "completed" by Eddie Kramer.
This isn't the first time there has been funny buisness used to bring Hendrix's incomplete recordings to market.

Anyone else remember Alan Douglas, who died this year, and his involvement?

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/15/a...ho-mined-hendrix-archive-dies-at-82.html?_r=0

Hendrix, who died in 1970, had a brief friendship with Mr. Douglas, who was later hired to go through the many hours of unreleased recordings the guitarist left behind. The anger Mr. Douglas stirred in many Hendrix fans began in 1975, when he released two albums, “Crash Landing” and “Midnight Lightning,” culled from these tapes; most critics found them, or at least parts of them, worthwhile, but trouble erupted with the revelation that in remixing the originals, Mr. Douglas had replaced tracks backing Hendrix’s guitar with newly recorded music by other players.

In the wake of the outcry, his explanation was always that he wanted Hendrix’s music to find its way to a new audience at a time when his star had begun to fade; the playing behind him on the tapes was, by Mr. Douglas’s lights, substandard, and failed to showcase Hendrix to the best advantage. But among rock critics and fans, the debate lingered for years.

“If you take this work at face value, without the baggage of what ‘producer’ Alan Douglas did to the tapes,” Joe Viglione wrote in a review on the website AllMusic that also disparaged a co-producer, Tony Bongiovi, “it’s still Hendrix. Maybe God allowed the series of albums to happen so the world could see Hendrix’s work could survive doctoring and musicians jamming with his art after the fact.”

In Mr. Douglas’s defense, the rock journalist and critic John Masouri wrote a long piece in 2011 on the website densesignals.com, calling Mr. Douglas “one of our last great musical visionaries.” Of the Hendrix kerfuffle, he wrote that Mr. Douglas’s decision to improve the original tracks was the right one.

“Wisely, he’d also edited out passages where Jimi had toyed with a riff repeatedly, searching for just the right phrase,” Mr. Masouri wrote. “All things considered, it’s highly unlikely that Hendrix would have sanctioned the release of poorly executed material, yet the die was cast, and the producer has been branded a controversial figure ever since.”
Five years after Hendrix’s untimely passing in September 1970, Douglas was asked to prepare Hendrix’s archival recordings for release.

His initial project, ‘Crash Landing,’ became a gold-selling hit.
‘Midnight Lightning’ followed in 1975, but by then word had leaked that Douglas had dubbed in some new musical parts — creating a new firestorm of criticism.
Hendrix drummer Mitch Mitchell later backed the decision, saying some of the playing on these rough demos was substandard.

Meanwhile, under Douglas’ stewardship, Hendrix’s initial three recordings underwent their first major remastering.
Additional recordings of Hendrix at Monterey, Winterland and Woodstock were made available for the first time.
The archival releases shed new light on Hendrix songs including ‘Peace in Mississippi‘ and ‘Machine Gun.’ Albums like 1980′s ‘Nine to the Universe’ and 1994′s platinum-selling ‘Jimi Hendrix: Blues’ helped frame the influences of jazz and roots music, respectively, on the guitarist, as well.


Read More: Controversial Jimi Hendrix Producer Alan Douglas Dies | http://ultimateclassicrock.com/alan-douglas-dies/?trackback=tsmclip
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
22,591
Yes.
They were "completed" by Eddie Kramer.
This isn't the first time there has been funny buisness used to bring Hendrix's incomplete recordings to market.

Anyone else remember Alan Douglas, who died this year, and his involvement?

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/15/a...ho-mined-hendrix-archive-dies-at-82.html?_r=0
Um, your chronology is off. The Cry Of Love and Rainbow Bridge came soon after Jimi passed. The Cry Of Love came out like 4 months after he died. The first Alan Douglas di#ked-with album was Crash Landing (which was worth it for the studio version of Message Of Love) which came out in 1975.
The Cry of Love sounds pretty 'complete' to me. This new mastering makes it even sound better.
Irregardless of the Hendrix family's or remote Hendrix family's managing of the Jimi's intellectual property do think these brilliant recordings should just be locked up just because the man passed away?
 

Young John

Member
Messages
402
Maybe Janie Hendrix is looking to buy a new house or something.
:aok
...a new house or 4. I refuse to give the estate another dime....ever....period. They're as bad for the Hendrix legacy as every thief that came before them.
I have all of my vinyl on disc.
Pound salt Janie.:wave
 






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