Cymbal suggestions

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Jaddy, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. Jaddy

    Jaddy Member

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    Hi good TGP people, I hope you are all doing well. I play in a four piece 'folk/grass' band with largely acoustic instruments (though some electric as well). We have a kick drum converted from a 14 inch tom. I'd like to add a single cymbal to the mix. I'd like something that offers great variety, but know little about them. Can someone please suggest ideas of specific cymbals I might consider researching? Additionally, what is the dimension of the little hole in the centre? I assume it is of universal size?

    Thank you so much in advance and best wishes to all.

    Jaddy
     
  2. NyteOwl

    NyteOwl Member

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    Um, no offense, but you're asking for drum advice on a guitar forum. :huh

    I suspect you'd fair a lot better if you were to ask this question on any of the myriad drum forums out there:

    Google is your friend...
     
  3. Jaddy

    Jaddy Member

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    Thanks, but I'm fine with asking here.
     
  4. n8cjohn

    n8cjohn Member

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    You don't specify ride or crash - so maybe you are looking for a combination crash/ride. They exist - but i've never played one - or had a drummer in my band play one with our group. You may want to hunt one of those down. probably the smaller the better for a bluegrass band.

    If you are just looking for a crash kind of cymbal - for bluegrass music - i would recommend something very light - like a 10" splash or a 12" or smaller thin crash. Neither of these would be very versatile - but would probably blend best with the kind of music you play - at the volumes that I suspect you may be playing.

    You want something with a really short decay.

    If you are on a budget - try Saluda cymbals - out of Columbia, Sc.
     
  5. Jaddy

    Jaddy Member

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    Thanks, that's really helpful! I know nothing at all about cymbals, just know that I am looking for something that can cover a lot of ground (we'll use brushes and mallets or whatever fits the piece). When I characterize our music as 'folk/grass', I mean there is a bluegrass influence, but also some pure folk as well as rock and roll. We do originals and all sorts of other material from a bit of jazz, a bit of classical right up to currently trying to master our version of side two of "Abbey Road" (lots to learn there). Hell, we've even tried 'When Doves Cry', which worked well with accordion, mandolin and three part harmonies.

    Size is important as our rehearsal room is 'cozy' for want of a better word!

    Hope that helps clarify what I'm after..

    Jaddy
     
  6. mj07

    mj07 Supporting Member

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    There are several Crash/ride cymbals available that can really do both convincingly.
     
  7. mcp

    mcp Member

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    I recommend Bosphorus brand cymbals. They aren't as bright sounding as some others, they are still hand hammered etc. They have what is called a Crash/Ride for example or maybe just a larger crash can double as a ride in your situation. Try looking at the Traditional Series as a start. You will get many suggestions, this is just one.
     
  8. Guitarnotsoguru

    Guitarnotsoguru Ultimate Plutonium Member

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    Hi Jaddy, First, I'm a drummer then a half baked guitarist. Would this be your ONLY cymbal or tell me what your current cymbal(s) are that you'd be adding to.
     
  9. tsar nicholas

    tsar nicholas Member

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    The crash / ride cymbals I've experienced don't do the "ride" thing very well, but I guess if you can only have one cymbal and you're going to do jazz as well as folk, you need something that can sound ride-ish. But if the jazz aspect if of minimum importance and the rest of the stuff you're doing is folky, I'd definitely second n8cjohn's suggestion of a thin crash. I like Zildjian A Custom crashes, and I also like the old-school Ks for a more brooding sound, but I don't know whether they make a thin crash in the K alloy.

    and yeah, the mounting hole on cymbals is a standard size.


    I have to say, if I were in your shoes, I'd get a crash and a ride both.


    I haven't had much experience with cymbals outside of Zildjian, low-end Sabian, and Paiste, so I can't comment on the other brands mentioned.
     
  10. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    Whatever you decide, I suggest e-bay. I've gotten cymbals for 1/2 price and less, no complaints.
     
  11. chrisr777

    chrisr777 Member

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    The variety of sounds you would want in your specific situation would be covered fairly well by an 18" medium to medium heavy weight crash/ride. Anything smaller won't handle the ride work and anything bigger might be too much of a crash for the folk stuff. I personally am devoted to Zildjian, but there are many brands out there that will do the job. Go down to a music store and test them out. There are differences between any two of the same exact make and model of a cymbal.
     
  12. m@2

    m@2 Member

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    i'd suggest craigslist for cymbals, they are $$$ new but can be bought for 50+% off used, assuming they pass visual and playing inspection (no cracks etc.)
     
  13. gilman

    gilman Member

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    Go to a music store where they will let you try a cymbal at your place of practice.It helps to see if you like the sound where you practice as well as how it works with your kit.Used can work fine,its the sound that counts.
    Cymbals can be very offensive and down right nasty,again try before you buy.Also get your self some hot rod dowel sticks,very good with lower volume acoustic music.

    gilman,rock drummer
    syr.n.y.
     
  14. Jaddy

    Jaddy Member

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    Guitarnotsogure: We have no cymbals currently, but due to the size constraints of our space can probably only fit one.

    Thanks so much for all of the above replies, I'm excited to get to work in selecting one and now feel I have a good starting point.

    Jaddy
     
  15. rw2003

    rw2003 Member

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  16. DrumBob

    DrumBob Gold Supporting Member

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    I'm also a drummer first, guitarist second. I'd say you need a nice, all-purpose 16" crash cymbal, so I recommend you go to your local independent music store or drumshop and try some out. Look on craigslist also, as someone else suggested.

    As far as brands, there are many, many choices these days. When I started playing, there was Zildjian or garbage, that's all, although Paiste was starting to come onto the US market around 1968 or so. I would say get a med-thin crash with a sweeter attack that will blend into the sound of the band, and not produce harsh overtones. Chinese-made cymbals like Stagg, Dream and Wuhan, tend to have a lot of narural "trash" to their tone, and that may not be right for you, although that's not always true. Remember, the thicker a cymbal is, the brighter and "gongier" it's going to sound. A thinner crash will usually sound warmer and darker. It all depends on the sound you're looking for.

    The secret is to just play lots of them and see which one works for you. When you find the right one, you'll know. You'll say, "That's the one!" It's happened to me a lot over the years. I was trying out Sabian rides one day in a music store, and played a 21" AA Series Dry Ride. All it took was one quick hit on it, and I knew. I left with it under my arm, and still use it all the time.

    Good luck.
     
  17. Jaddy

    Jaddy Member

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    Hey DrumBob! Great to know. Based on this I'm definitely looking for something thinner, though I will keep an open mind and try a bunch over the next couple of days. Thanks, man.
     
  18. Zounds Perspex

    Zounds Perspex Supporting Member

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    Based on the description of your band, I'd say look into an 18" cymbal of some kind that's a bit on the dark side. something like a Zildjian 18" K Dark Thin Crash or here's one great underrated cymbal - Paiste Giant Beat 18". Is absolutely meant to be a crash but has great crash ride qualities, and would probably sound great with a brush.

    here's another tip - and I'm in no way affiliated with this site -
    but if you go to mycymbal.com they have videos of each individual cymbal they sell.
    they have both used cymbals and carry a line called Sabian SR2s - recycled cymbals - that are great bargains. Cymbals can vary a lot even with the same long description, so the vids are invaluable. The Paiste I mentioned is a big exception to that - Paiste is probably the most consistent cymbal maker around today.

    one last thing to look at - Dream Cymbals. lots on ebay with sound files, cheap, and some sound quite good.
     
  19. Hulakatt

    Hulakatt Supporting Member

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    just one word of caution: cheap cymbals sound cheap and good cymbals cost money. You can get good cymbals cheaper but don't buy something just because of the price. My wife can now be a cymbal snob just from listening to me play drums and when we see other acts, she will comment on how cheap the drummers cymbals sound if they are playing junk.
     
  20. Guitarnotsoguru

    Guitarnotsoguru Ultimate Plutonium Member

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    Jaddy, I'm thinking I'd go with a set of Hi Hats....... Keep rhythm with them and crash them a bit and even ride them perhaps.........the most versatile in my opinion. :)
     

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