Dario Chiazzolino, amazing technique ATTYA

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Clifford-D, Dec 31, 2017.


  1. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    I posted this in sound hound, but some of you guys don't go over there and I thought you would get a kick out of this guys extraordinary chops. His chord playing makes me joyfully dizzy. I only found out about him a couple of days ago.
     
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  2. vintagelove

    vintagelove Member

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    Cool unique voice.
     
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  3. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Really nice. The head sections at the beginning and end of this seem arranged and would be fun to 'take off' the recording. You go first Cliff!
     
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  4. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    Done!
     
  5. Sascha Franck

    Sascha Franck Member

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    Interesting from a technical POV. But it sounds like a programmed robot and doesn't even touch me just once.
     
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  6. cubistguitar

    cubistguitar Member

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    As a guitarist I am impressed, as a musician I am bored stiff and already turned the station.
     
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  7. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    Does this guy do anything for you?
    I discovered Ben while checking out Dario,
    He has a Holdsworth meets Abercrombie sound, but he picks more, less legato.
    Lots of fine players under the radar.

     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2018
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  8. Bluesful

    Bluesful Member

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    That's an interesting perspective, and interesting that I didn't find the performance robotic at all. I saw Deep Purple a few years back, and Steve Morse..........................that was robotic.
     
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  9. Sascha Franck

    Sascha Franck Member

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    No.
     
  10. StevenA

    StevenA Member

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    Great player, indigestible solo.
     
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  11. ivers

    ivers Member

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    I enjoy a lot with his approach, like the type of lines and sound he's going for, and will check out more of his playing. But maybe I'm spoiled by listening to Holdsworth all the time lately, and that sets the bar unreasonable high, but the solo for me didn't feel like it had much of a build up or story to it.
    That's of course just about my preferences at this time and how I hear stuff. Making a really great, coherent improvisation that takes risks and challenges the ear seems very difficult anyway. When I saw Jonathan Kreisberg live, I thought that was one of the best qualities, that he managed to make use his technique and harmonic knowledge to create something that sounded whole, and not just different ideas patched together.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
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  12. cubistguitar

    cubistguitar Member

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    right, amazing practice this guy must have, but there was not one idea in that solo, just bags of arps and patterns without a cohesive musical phrase until the slight rhythmic release signalling the return of the head, weird to have so much skill and do so little with it, I'm not saying he should learn licks, but he should let his guitar sing
     
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  13. Sascha Franck

    Sascha Franck Member

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    Now, while this might sound arrogant and while I will never ever be able to even remotely play even half as technically proficient as the two guys mentioned in this thread, after listening to those two tunes (read: it could possibly be quite different on other stuff of theirs), my thought is that they lack of some basic understanding about the importance of "feel" in music. Obviously, something as vague as "feel" can't be described properly, let alone any possible description could be valid for each and everybody, but it's really amazing how little I'm musically impressed with any of their playing. And fwiw, I can absolutely enjoy some high profile technical playing, it's also not that I'm jealous or anything.
    Ok, one could argue that this is not my style of music - but then, I do have quite a fusion background and at least a sort of jazz knowledge (and interest).
    I even think that one could learn tons by transcribing and analyzing these guys, but considering whatever might define "pure listening pleasure" they're leaving me as cold as it gets.

    Might as well be a phenomenom with some super skilled players. There's quite some of them that seem to leave the area of "pure musical enjoyment" in favour of getting more and more complexed and complicated. I noticed something similar with Frank Gambale. I remember seeing him with the Chick Corea Electric Band ages ago and it's been quite nice. Very technical already, but quite tasty all throughout (at least given the IMO debatable context...). Went to another gig with him some years later (not sure, might've been with Steve Smith) and it had "speed!!" printed all over - so much it efficiently covered all of his feel (at least to my ears). These days, he's still doing his sweeping tricks quite a bit, but pretty much embedded into a larger, tasty musical picture.
    Triggered by the Diorio/Metheny thread, I also listened to some earlier Diorio stuff - there's some pretty tasty things to be found, but again, his later stuff seems to be drenched in technical proficiency (even if it's more like "harmonic hell" rather than overly complicated by plain technical means).
    Otoh, there's folks such as Benson - great enough to stun literally everybody, yet always extremely aware of the overal musical "impact" or so.

    Alright, one might argue that this kinda stuff is just over my head, so I'm too confused to detect the deeper musical value of things - but personally, I don't think so. As said, I have no problems listening to some very complexed stuff and enjoy it. Even to some stuff that I don't fully understand but in which I can still find my ways to detect the bigger musical picture. Not so in these two cases.
     
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  14. kimock

    kimock Member

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  15. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    I'm with you and the majority 100% on this, great technique, no feel or "story". So, other than the pyrotechniques, I found it boring, for both players.

    But this thread was just about their technique that was over the top. I would put lots of people in this catagory. Brian Baker and Chris Crocco for two.

    It just illustrates to me that great technique does not always mean great lines.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2018
  16. StevenA

    StevenA Member

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    I got nothing against great technique and could use a boatload of it myself
     
  17. vintagelove

    vintagelove Member

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    I know this might shock some folks, but...




    Have you all consider the artists above don't care what you, or anyone else thinks about their art? That the music they play is an expression of their feelings thoughts and ideas?




    It always strikes me as odd when anyone comments, "that guy has no feel/emotion/etc". I assure you, what he's playing, he's worked very hard to get it to that specific place.


    There's melody, and feeling. You just might not get it (and that's totally ok).
     
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  18. cubistguitar

    cubistguitar Member

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    I am sure that the two guitarists above have put massive personal energy and passion for their instrument ahead of many other pursuits in life, they had to sacrifice something to be so darn technically proficient, I would sincerely love to have even a part of that prowess, I am jealous for what they can do and the clear mind to do it again and again. But, I seriously thought this must be a total fluke, Dario must be masterful guitarist in the right context, so I looked up several videos of him playing with a band in front of audiences. The setting changes the results some, he allows space for the bass and drums to work with him and doesn't completely over play and overthink the moment, but the net effect is about the same, no fire, no jazz, no real interplay between band members, empty music. In fact the whole trio seems like they are doing something rote and even the applause from the audience seemed obligatory, not spontaneous. If this is the end run for hard work, he should have stopped to goof around more, just making a random noise would be less painful than all this perfection with no point. Music is supposed to be fun, you know, make you grin or tap your foot or even pick up your own guitar. Maybe I don't get it, that's totally OK.
     
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  19. kimock

    kimock Member

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    I think your take on it is pretty much right in line with the conventional wisdom regarding emotion and meaning in music (speech too) from a psychological perspective.

    In a nutshell, order over complexity equals meaning, and heightened emotional response is associated with rhythmic and intervallic variety, dynamic and microtonal variations, vibrato, etc.

    Basically contrasts as opposed to constants.

    It’s all on a spectrum of course, nobody has the exact same emotional response to “In Xanadu did Kubla Khan a stately pleasure dome decree” and a livestock auction for example.
    I’m not denying livestock auctions can be pretty emotionally arousing affairs, but rate of information isn’t necessarily the same thing as “content”, and oratory and auctioneering serve different ends by different means.

    I liked the Dario stuff, “robotic” at that level doesn’t confront me but I’m a big Conlon Nancarrow fan too.
    Anyway, I don’t think you need to apologize for not being moved to tears by modern jazz guitar playing, I’m guessing that’s totally normal.
     
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  20. Sascha Franck

    Sascha Franck Member

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    Hm - I'm not exactly apologizing. I'm really just wondering. I often find plenty of enjoyable things in all sorts of music. Which includes modern jazz wizardry.
    Fortunately, it's all a matter of taste, so there's no need to apologize anyway.
     

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