Decent cheap mikes

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by chrisr777, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. chrisr777

    chrisr777 Member

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    I just got my hands on an old Tascam analog four-track. Can anybody give me some help on miking our amps on a budget?
     
  2. testing1two

    testing1two Gold Supporting Member

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    Start with a trusty Shure SM57 or beta 57. A Sennheiser e906 is also a good starter...and they can be used live as well. Since you're probably not recording in an acoustically tuned & treated space, you should close mic the guitar cabs and then put some packing blankets over the top to minimize the room reflections picked up by the mics.

    If that doesn't get you where you want to go and you're ready to enter the world (aka money-pit) of project studio recording, you'll want to start shopping for large-diaphragm condenser mics and quality microphone preamps...and it wouldn't hurt to acoustically treat your tracking room either.
     
  3. shooto

    shooto Supporting Member

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  4. Unburst

    Unburst Member

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    Don't bother with the a 57, way too "tweaky" of a mic if you're a beginner.
    You always hear people say "just use a 57" but they really don't sound that good, they are popular for other reasons than their sound.

    The Senheisser e609 is a better sounding and easier to use mic, can be had brand new for $110.
     
  5. ted01

    ted01 Member

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    Check out the CAD mics. The CAD E100 is a pretty decent condensor mic for about $200. If that's more than your budget can stand you might want to try the Audix OM-2. I got a pair of them from GC for about $65/each and they sound pretty good (given the price!). A step up from an SM-57 IMHO.

    Ted
     
  6. chrisr777

    chrisr777 Member

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    Thanks for all the advice.
     
  7. hawaii5_o

    hawaii5_o Member

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    A great mid-range condenser is the AT4040. Pretty versatile and around $300 new. You could probably talk the GC guy down to $250.
     
  8. James

    James Member

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    For a small-diaphram condenser (good for acoustic guitars, room mics, drum overheads, etc), I really like the old Shure Beta Green 4.0/4.1 mics. You can find them used for $50.
     
  9. LSchefman

    LSchefman Member

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    I think 57s are great guitar amp mics, because I like their sound.

    It's all a matter of preference.
     
  10. Unburst

    Unburst Member

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    They can be great if used correctly, especially in a dense mix, listen to ScottL's 57 tones, they're awesome.

    It's not a mic I would recommend to a novice though.
     
  11. Greggy

    Greggy Member

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    I suppose there are few mysteries left in cheap mics for guitar cabs. Here's my list, which is no revelation but these mics work well for me. Drum roll please.

    SM57-high gain, mid gain, good stuff
    e609 silver-either gainier tracks or cleans
    Cascade Fathead-I've only had mine for about 1 month, I like it about 2 feet back from the cab
    Audix i5-haven't used one yet, but the clips I've heard are OK

    The Fathead is the most expensive of the bunch at $199. If you want to spend a little more, the MD421 is really nice on clean to light crunch guitar IMO.
     
  12. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    SM58beta for vocals, SM57 for guitars.

    Check this out!

    You can upgrade both of these for $75.00 each at mercenary audio for higher fidelity or buy them pre-built with the TAB-Funkenwerk transformer mod.
    http://mercenary.com/smmiwitatr.html
     
  13. richpeax

    richpeax Member

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    Another vote for SM58 beta. You will see alot of the pro's using these. But they are probably going through a nice preamp.
     
  14. chrisr777

    chrisr777 Member

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    It is a Portastudio. No preamps as of yet, but that is the kind of thing I am looking into.
     
  15. drive-south

    drive-south Member

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    I have a 20 year old Porta Studio (Tascam Porta1). It's not getting any use at all these days as I picked up a Tascam DP01FX-CD. The DP01 is intended as a digital porta-studio. It "thinks" it's a cassette deck!

    Maybe I was lucky but I picked up my DP01 for $299 brand new in the box. I wouldn't invest any money into mics, preamps or anything else for an old cassette porta-studio.

    drive-south
     
  16. stelligan

    stelligan Member

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    Audix i5 is a 57 killer IMHO and very affordable. Built like a tank, too.
     
  17. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    If you have a guitar pre-amp with tubes and the option to run it clean
    with no FX, you can actually get some very good results.

    If you don't have a mixer, you can buy an XLR to 1/4 cable with a built in
    transformer.
     
  18. alvagoldbook

    alvagoldbook Member

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    I use both a shure 57 and a sennheiser e609. Problem with using a sennheiser is that the mic is a lot less sensitive than the 57. Which means it will require you to turn your amp up fairly loud to get a good signal on a 4 track. A 57 works well, but can definately sound very fizzy on the upper frequencies, but this highly depends on how much gain you have on your amp. the more gain, the more fizz.
     
  19. street

    street Member

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    I've got the same Portastudio cassete 4 track recorder. You can get some nice recordings, lof fi, but nice with good amps and mic placement.
    I've used both the 57 and e609 with this recorder and each have their good points.
    With the 57 placed in the right spot on the grille, you can't beat it IMO, but I use the e609 a lot because it's so easy and forgiving.
    I play through NMV amps and most are "warm" sounding. The tape recorder will give you more warmth and I find with the 57 it can get muddy. The e609 seem to be a little more trebly.
    If you take your time, you'll be amazed at the recordings you can get on that simple cassette 4 track. Work on mic placement and get the amp volume up a bit, speaker movement is key I think.
    I place the mics about 4-6" away from the grille. Used to mic right up to the grille but I've moved them out a little lately and am liking the results, as long as the amp volume is up.
     
  20. Brudr

    Brudr Member

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    Pre-amp or not, these are great vocal mics and they can stand some abuse.
     

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