decent price for a '77 Les Paul Custom?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by spookyelectric, Jun 19, 2019.

  1. spookyelectric

    spookyelectric Supporting Member

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    Looking at a '77 Les Paul Custom and wondering what a decent price for one is? I know that it's not the most desirable era (Norlin era, correct?), but I have a chance to play it today and want to make sure I don't over pay.

    Gold hardware looks pretty worn, plenty of nicks and dings, the gold cover has been removed from the bridge pickup, non-original knobs, tuners were replaced with gold Schallers (old ones, by the looks of it). Some nice belt buckle rash on the back down to the wood, but none of that stuff really bothers me-- it's my first vintage Gibson and I like the look of the ones that have been played hard.

    So what say ye?
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2019
  2. big mike

    big mike Plexi Loving Admin Staff Member

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    2500-3K depending based on reverb.

    I'd say 2200 tops. And it's gotta be a killer player with no issues.
     
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  3. spookyelectric

    spookyelectric Supporting Member

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    The ones I just checked on Reverb seem to be anywhere from $3k-4k, but they seem to be in better condition than this one. You hit the price right on the head, big mike! They're asking $2200 for this one..
     
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  4. samdjr74

    samdjr74 Silver Supporting Member

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    I own a few Norlin era LPC's and they all sound and play fine. They all need a major diet but nothing you can do about that. Is it a pancake body? 77 was when it was phased out but there's a chance it has it. also what color is it? If it's something really interesting, it may add some value but I think Mike has a good number with the condition described.
     
  5. spookyelectric

    spookyelectric Supporting Member

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    It's black with I believe an ebony board, gold hardware. Not sure if it's the pancake body or not-- any easy way to tell when I get there to look at it in person? Would the sides show some finish sink that would give it away?
     
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  6. samdjr74

    samdjr74 Silver Supporting Member

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    The sides may show something, like a seem half way up. Also, open the control cavity, that may show it as well.

    Even if it is a pancake body, it's not the end of the world. I find them to be a little heavier then a regular body.
     
  7. philiprst

    philiprst Supporting Member

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    The price depends a lot on condition and originality. Are the tailpiece and bridge original (sounds like they are)? How about the pickups? Has the guitar been refretted and how good was the refret? The through the finish wear is a negative since there are plenty of late 70s LPCs that are in better condition. $3k would be a typical asking price, getting it to $2.5k or below would represent a reasonable deal. Personally I would rather pay a few hundred more to get something in better condition (i.e. moderate playwear).
     
  8. spookyelectric

    spookyelectric Supporting Member

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    Well I tried it out... sounded ok, but nothing spectacular. The bridge pickup had been replaced with a dimarzio PAF. The tuners were the original Gibson tuners. It must’ve had a refret at some point since it’s a ‘77, but if one was done it was done very well. Binding nibs were perfect, etc. Weight was probably 11 lbs. I ended up passing on it but getting a 2017 Gibson SG Standard for a really good price instead.

    Thanks for the advice and info, guys!
     
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  9. DonP

    DonP Member

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    My '77 weighs 10lbs 12oz. Heavily worn, paint off the neck, divots in the fretboard, some buckle rash but the body paint is still there. All original and sounds fantastic to me. Likely why it's been played to death. One piece body.
     
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  10. 70 Mach 1

    70 Mach 1 Supporting Member

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    I was just going to say my 80 std weighs a ton.
    I Remember well hitting up music stores in the late 70s.
    That was the norm
     
  11. Jason_77

    Jason_77 Member

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    The prices really jumped once it hit the 40 year mark. I would love to get one as it's my birth year.
     
  12. philiprst

    philiprst Supporting Member

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    Thanks so much for the update. I think you were probably wise to pass given its condition and missing PUP, depending on the price of course. Most of the LPCs from that era are 10-11lbs which is heavy by today's standards. But that's part of why they sound the way they do and a lot of great music was made using those guitars. A 70s LPC into a cranked Marshall is a classic and massive sound. For example, Randy Rhoads used a 74 LPC in his early days with Ozzy and if you watch some of the live videos from that era and, if you are like me, you might believe that was the best tone he ever had.
     
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  13. Dashface

    Dashface Member

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    You did the right thing judging the guitar on its merits and not just because it’s “old”.

    I’ve owned three Norlin LPCs, all right around the $2k mark, all of them replaced with newer and better Gibsons :D
     

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