Designing a home rehearsal space

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by Robal, Sep 4, 2005.


  1. Robal

    Robal Supporting Member

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    I want to build a rehearsal studio of about 20 x 25 next to my garage. It needs to be sound proofed to avoid bothering the neighbors, while sounding good inside. I expect I will do some live recording, but it will be more oriented for playing with friends than being a dedicated recording studio, i.e., I don't need a separate control booth. Any books or sites you can recommend that will help me come up with a functional design? Any mistakes to avoid, based on your experiences? Thanks for any help you can provide.
     
  2. gearitis

    gearitis Gold Supporting Member

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    I recommend "Building a Recording Studio" by Jeff Cooper. There is a lot of info in there that would apply to your project.
     
  3. MikeP

    MikeP Member

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    Man perfect timing
    I was just wanting to do the exact same thing.
    Tired of selling my amps & looking for smaller & smaller ones;)

    I have space already ( a room behind the garage )
    So I am just trying to figure out how to sound proof it.
     
  4. BSHARP

    BSHARP Member

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    Getting a room sound proof so you can crank up the stack to blow the drummer away is a matter of density in the insulation.

    Lead sheets that roll out and are tacked on the inside and outside of framing is available but spendy. I built a studio in a garage some years ago and we ended up framing walls inside the garage about 8-10" from the exterior walls. The space between the two walls was filled with sand bags. The walls themselves were covered with two layers of sound board. We were a very loud band and it worked for us. The thing to remember is the bass frequencies need high density insulation to block them.

    Have fun!
     
  5. MikeP

    MikeP Member

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    Thanks
    Actually it is just me & probably always will be.
    So I probably can get by with a lot less in the sound proofing dept.
    Sounds like that was quite theh project you had going there.
    Lead sheets & sand bags..wow

    Thanks
    Mike
     
  6. Strat-o-Ck

    Strat-o-Ck Guest

    Soundproofingamerica.com is the place to start. The toughest thing is controlling the bass. The long waves travel through almost anything it seems. Mass is the only thing that'll effectively stop them. As in concrete! Insulation and double walls and all that crap help, but nothing beats something solid. Mass Loaded Vinyl (MLV) seems to be the greatest creation in the history of man for soundproofing.

    Tuning the inside of the room will be a piece of cake compared to controlling the bass coming out and attacking the neighbors house. Check out that website. They're musicians and can give you all the help you need and sell you what you need to get the job done.
     
  7. gixxerrock

    gixxerrock Member

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    I built studio in my garage and I love it. It is my creative space and I can play my tube amps at a healthy volume at 3am and not worry about wife and 3 kids sleeping or neighbors!! I have 2 pieces of advice:

    1. If you have any control over it, choose your room dimensions wisely. An 11x13x8 room is better than a 12x12x8. I put together a spreadsheet and checked all the resonant modes and cross modes.

    2. Soundproofing is what gave me the freedom to enjoy. When constructing the room, the key is decoupling (use stagerred studs, sound channel, sound board). After that, it is mass. After you have drywall up, plug a CD player into your guitar amp at healthy volume and walk around the house to see if it is acceptable for 3am levels. If not, slap up another layer of drywall. I made the mistake of mudding and painting my room before my wife asked if I could make it a little quieter (our bedroom is directly above). Pay attention to adjacent rooms and have a backup plan.

    Good luck, it is worth every penny.

    Shawn.
     
  8. FlyingVBlues

    FlyingVBlues Gold Supporting Member

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    This month's Recording Magazine has a good article on building home studios in urban spaces.

    FVB
     

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