Did decking tremelo on hss strat or adding 5 springs give the H more oomph?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Webfoot, Apr 24, 2015.

  1. Webfoot

    Webfoot Supporting Member

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    Trying out a strat with hss, floating trem and 3 springs. Sounds pretty good but can hear the jangle and less muscle on the humbucker than on a hard tailed guitar. I know... apples and oranges.

    I don't own this strat and can't experiment.

    But if I decked the tremelo or/and added 2 more springs, would I truly notice more grunt/beef from the humbucker?
     
  2. dazco

    dazco Member

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    I wouldn't say "grunt" or "beef". But it does make it more solid sounding/feeling. I however find too much of that isn't good either, so i deck mine so the springs just barely hols the plate against the body. That "on the fence" position just seems to give the best overall tone to my ear. But understand that what u r hearing between a hardtail and trem is just the way it is, and whil edecking it will help it's not the same. If you want hardtail fender humbucker tone you'd be better off getting a H/S or H/H tele. That'll kick a strat with a hummer's a$$.
     
  3. zeffbeff

    zeffbeff Member

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    IMHO: zero difference in tone. May as well replace the steel springs with zinc alloy and listen for tone changes. There won't be any.

    I deck and block all my Strats.
     
  4. gulliver

    gulliver Member

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    Might just be different density of the guitars ... assuming all else is equal. The secret is simply finding the right pickup for the right guitar.
     
  5. tone?

    tone? Supporting Member

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    The only change decking a strat term adds is a bit more attack because the trem doesn't have any give when you strike the strings.
    You might like it or not.

    Tons of great tones made with floating strat trems and decked.
    I really wouldn't pay attention to it too much. Just choose based on what feels best for you.
    I like both.
     
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  6. redgold

    redgold Supporting Member

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    If it has a zinc block, you might find the tonal change you are looking for by swapping in a steel block.
     
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  7. halcyon

    halcyon Supporting Member

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    I can definitely hear the difference between a decked and floating trem on a Strat. It's perceiveable; not cork-sniffing nonsense. With a floating trem, you get more of that bouncy, Strat-y sproinginess from the springs -- the attack is a bit less defined.
     
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  8. metropolis_4

    metropolis_4 Member

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    I agree, I think there is definitely a difference (and I'm certainly not someone who frets over small tone issues). More of a difference if you actually have it blocked than if you just deck the bridge with more springs. I had an alder block cut and fit to my trem cavity to block it and I think that extra contact with the body made a very perceptible difference in tone.
     
  9. HayekFan

    HayekFan Member

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    I don't think it makes a difference. The test is to have your bridge barely floating, then pull back on the arm so it's decked. Do this as you're strumming. If there were a difference you would hear a distinct change as the bridge comes into contact with the body. But you don't.

    The reason it doesn't change is that the contact between the bridge and the screws is sufficient to couple the bridge to the body. Adding more contact area doesn't increase the coupling.
     
  10. David Garner

    David Garner Member

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    I definitely hear a difference. For most stuff I prefer the tone floating. But I have one decked too as a change of pace.

    To me, the decked trem has more punch and girth to the tone. The floating trem is a bit lighter and sweeter.
     
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  11. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    Yes there's often a difference. Every guitar Will be different. But simply hit open low E and note the amount of resonance and sustain, then immediately pull up on the bar, while you TUNE back down to same pitch and note tone. Very often it's more powerful . Easy, easy exercise to do. You have the bridge coupling with the body. It works and if u do this ez test right you'll notice the change. I prefer float. I like to use the trem and it stays in tune better floating.
     
  12. Average Joe

    Average Joe Member

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    It's one of those things I can hear sitting at home playing by myself which doesn't make a lick of difference in a band context imho. But yeah, there is a slight difference
     
  13. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    Sure it can be sleight, just like moving up a gauge in strings, will be subtle to others, but all this stuff adds up and has a synergestic effect on the final sound.

    Another benefit of decking is stability for changing tuning and, string breaks. you'll be able to 5 string your way out of a song on stage, and that can make a big difference in the band. lol.
     
  14. metropolis_4

    metropolis_4 Member

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    That's the main reason I do it. The whole reason I had a block made for my strat was so I wouldn't have to bring multiple guitars to a gig to cover multiple tunings.
     
  15. tone?

    tone? Supporting Member

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    Btw. Malmsteen uses a floating bridge.

    He has a pretty aggressive sound if you ask me.
     
  16. icr

    icr Member

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    Rather than using the humbucker pickup height adjusting screws? Or are you going to use those to try and adjust the tremolo action?
     
  17. Tiny Montgomery

    Tiny Montgomery Supporting Member

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    It's important to keep "all other things being equal" in mind. I don't think anybody is suggesting there's just one deciding factor.
     
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  18. Lewguitar

    Lewguitar Member

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    With the floating trem there's a whole lot of string warble going on. Part of the Jeff Beck sound.

    With the trem decked and especially if its blocked, string bending is easier because you don't have to bend the string as far to raise it up to the desired pitch.

    Double stop and pedal steel type bends are more in tune with a decked or blocked trem because when you bend a string with a floating trem, the other strings go down in pitch a little rather than maintaining their pitch.

    So there are sound reasons to prefer one method or the other.
     
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  19. HayekFan

    HayekFan Member

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    Yes obviously decked versus undecked affects playing feel and pitch stability and the ability to do those trem flutters that Jeff Beck does. But that's not what I'm talking about. I'm talking about what the OP is about, which is how decking affects tone (aka oomph, grunt, beef, muscle). Pitch stability and playing feels is a different discussion.
     
  20. Jakejj2000

    Jakejj2000 Member

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    The oompf from the humbucker comes from the ridgidness of the wood and how hard the surface the string rests on is. Now i am not saying anything about "tone woods" i am saying that sustain comes from the harder woods. Now if this strat is a softer bodied strat you will have less oomf. But harder more. If it is a floating trem.. U will loose some of that oompf.
     

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