Did Hendrix ever use strict, alternate picking?

dead of night

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2,650
Hi, I tend to view strict alternate picking when changing strings as a modern, shred technique.

I think it's great and sounds good. However, did Hendrix ever use this technique? I don't mean the tremolo picking he did in songs like Pali Gap.

I tend to think of Hendrix as a blues player who used bends, hammer ons and pull offs from the major or minor pentatonic scales.

Did he ever use the shred technique of strict alternate picking, especially when changing strings, that perhaps most bluesy players don't use?
 

jpastras

Silver Supporting Member
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997
He had a pretty good right hand. I think when playing certain soul rhythm stuff, where you play walk-ups or little fills while comping, he surely would have done that, but example would be rare, because that kind of thing doesn't really fit his aesthetic. But if the question is "did he alternate pick?" then there's tons of film that says "Yes". Was he strict? Who cares? Once you have the technique that lets you accomplish your artistic goals, everything else is minutiae.
 

dlguitar64

Member
Messages
5,630
Hi, I tend to view strict alternate picking when changing strings as a modern, shred technique.

I think it's great and sounds good. However, did Hendrix ever use this technique? I don't mean the tremolo picking he did in songs like Pali Gap.

I tend to think of Hendrix as a blues player who used bends, hammer ons and pull offs from the major or minor pentatonic scales.

Did he ever use the shred technique of strict alternate picking, especially when changing strings, that perhaps most bluesy players don't use?
I think of alternate picking as an old fashioned bluegrass technique.
 

ZeyerGTR

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3,811
I dont know and don't care, but Hendrix pretty much did everything. I'm sure he did at some point, maybe a lot. Certainly a lot of videos out there to check it out.
 

Structo

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9,559
I am surprised sometimes when I see a guitarist playing lead and using only down strokes.

Some guys can pick really fast that way.

I do mostly alternative picking but try to play to the song.

It think it is mostly a style type thing, where there is no right answer.
 

arthur rotfeld

Silver Supporting Member
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7,049
I teach alternate picking a lot, to the point that I'm apologetic about it.

The thing is, almost everyone does it intuitively when strumming—down on the beat, up for the off beat. For whatever reason, that logic is tougher to apply to the small scale lead work.

Still, I stick to it, especially with people who have no logic to their picking or are using a picking "method" (being generous there) that isn't serving them.

I haven't studied Hendrix's picking much, but I have taught his picked runs with strict alternate picking, if only because it works and I know the student will (eventually) feel the logic of it and be able to play in time with a good groove. I do let them know that I'm a bit dogmatic about this and that there will come a time when they can evaluate it themselves, sooner or later. Whether Hendrix or anyone else, if I go to the video or can discern a pick stroke that's identifiable, I'll always teach that.

All that said, I'm sure it wouldn't take long to find some filmed passages that would show Hendrix doing this or not.
 

Phletch

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9,898
Of course it's not new.I was just making fun of the modern shred assertion.
Yeah, I laughed at that too. I instantly thought of quite a few jazz players who were doing it when shredding was only thought of as something done to fabric or paper.
 

monty

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21,979
I've listened to jimi a ton, cant recall anything where he was strictly alt picking.
 

t***9

Gold Supporting Member
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1,259
...But if the question is "did he alternate pick?" then there's tons of film that says "Yes". Was he strict? Who cares? Once you have the technique that lets you accomplish your artistic goals, everything else is minutiae.
Exactly, and well put.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
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32,624
I think Hendrix did what he needed to produce the 'sounds' he desired.
There remains the possibility that his technique was not developed enough such that his vocabulary was restricted to what he could play.
Had he been able to pick with YJM velocity would he have not composed using that ability?
We shall never know.:tapedshut
 

bdam123

Member
Messages
745
I dont think Hendrix strictly did anything besides kick ass. But yo answer your question, his playing pretty loose and open.
 

AngryHatter

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998
Unlike Santana or DiMeola, Jimi's technique was not etched in stone and changed to meet the needs of the song.
He was sloppy (strictly technique wise) the times I saw him but amazing, so - who cares?
 

Bluesful

Silver Supporting Member
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38,848
Unlike Santana or DiMeola, Jimi's technique was not etched in stone and changed to meet the needs of the song.
He was sloppy (strictly technique wise) the times I saw him but amazing, so - who cares?
Yep, agree with this. Never saw him live but you can see that he would adapt to serve the song as needed. FWIW that's what I love about certain guitarists - the ability to adapt and grow to serve a certain idea and then move on-wards and upwards, rather than being a 'technician' or robot.
 
Messages
1,123
Despite knowing that it's useless to cry over spilled milk but I can't help be a bit down sometimes at the thought of what we might be able to listen to had Hendrix lived. He was so young.
 




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