Did you have difficulty picking which style to get good at?

Mike_it_up

Member
Messages
250
I consider myself a pretty decent player, and I have worked hard to get that way, I enjoy a wide variety of music, from classic rock, to blues to metal, and all the years of practise has enabled me to play in whatever Genre I feel.

training your Ears, as well as your fingers has helped a lot. I've accumulated guitars for specific genres as well.

I bought a new Tele not too long ago, so I could explore the whole chicken pickin thing, and it does it perfectly.
 

icr

Member
Messages
2,811
Did you have difficulty picking which style to get good at?
No, but when I first started I had difficulty picking with style to get good attack.
 

667

Member
Messages
206
I think that the answer really depends on your personal goals. If you really want to be a jazz player, you're going to have to totally immerse yourself in listening to and studying jazz. I'd say the same thing goes for bluegrass, classical, blues, country, even metal; genres with a really distinct way of playing which defines their sound. "Rock" is sort of the catch-all, in my opinion. Not that it make it any less significant, it's just that there's more of a melting pot of techniques from other genres of music which have traditionally relied on a more structured approach to creating music. It could be argued that a musician who has truly studied and mastered learning "Music" on their respective instrument could play in any style with probably 98% approximation. But it's that last 2% of feeling that comes from dedication, experience, and immersion in a particular style. (*note: I'm completely making up these figures to illustrate my point, so please don't slam me on exact percentages).
 

ripgtr

Member
Messages
8,773
The only way you get good at anything is to put the time in.

If you want to be good at any one style, you have to put the time in and do the deep dive.

Also, is this just for you, for fun or are you looking to play in a band? Bands are usually pretty stylistically narrow because that is what the audience expects. (Most of the guys I've gigged with could play a lot of styles, some pretty radically different.)

That being said, I play and have gigged a lot of very different styles, and I like the variety.
 
Messages
985
I did. I wanted to be able to do it all, and was strongly influenced by guitarists like Steve Howe, who was able to cover a lot of different genres.

I later realized I'd be lucky if I got good at one style, and decided to focus on Rock, since I don't have the skills or the ear to play Jazz.
 

Lepinkäinen

Member
Messages
55
Many great things in music have been done by combining different influences to something new.

Find your own voice, whether is writing catchy simple riffs or doing techical wizardy.

Still requires a lot of effort though, and that only works, if you enjoy whatever you trying to accomplish.

I'm never gonna be great jazz musician, but studying some jazz has helped me find new sounds (chords, rhytms, arpeggios, concepts etc.) for writing (post)rock songs.
 

blong

Member
Messages
2,205
I tried to learn anything that moved me. I played in metal, rock, blues, top 40, and country bands and got pretty good at all of them. I don't know any theory, so I struggle with anything too jazzy (like standards) and anything classical. I learned a few pieces of flamenco style stuff, as I was drawn to Al DiMeola, Paco De Lucio, and John McLaughlin when they did Friday Night in San Francisco and Passion, Grace, and Fire. I love The Gyspy Kings and try to learn a few licks here and there. My home base, rock, blues, and 80's metal. I love that stuff.

I say learn whatever songs hit you and move you. Try to learn the chords and changes, then learn the solos. You will learn a lot.

Bob
 

Hulakatt

Supporting Member
Messages
13,126
Not that it's a competition or anything, but I can think of another culture that seems to regularly hand Westerners their lunch when it comes to virtuosity.
Just because western society obsesses over the concept doesn't mean we're any good at it!
 

Ryan x Decent

Member
Messages
390
I'm in the same boat. I'm learning guitar as a working adult with a family so I missed those teen years where locking myself in a bedroom with a guitar and a stereo for 10 hours a day was a possibility, so I need to be really focused in my practice. I enjoy playing mostly metal, but I've found that focusing on playing "classic" rock (think Chuck Berry) has really helped, oddly enough. Those 50's and 60's rock songs cover so much - commonly used scale shapes, string bends, solos, chord progressions, how to construct harmonies and melodies, etc...
 

SlyStrat

Supporting Member
Messages
4,278
I always learn from my favorite guitar players.
Trower, Hendrix, Kossoff, Clapton, etc.
I prefer their concerts clips.
Over the last 20 years I've taken licks from all and converted them into MY style.
 

stratzrus

Philadelphia Jazz, Funk, and R&B
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
20,873
I had difficulty "getting good". Choosing a style was a piece of cake, I just play the music I like.
 

Mr Fingers

Member
Messages
2,492
No. I never did that. Never thought that way. Personally, I think that style is a by-product, not an objective.
 

derekd

Supporting Member
Messages
41,760
Yeah, I've become less and less interested in wankery and more and more interested in complex harmony and rhythm.

While I admire many soloists who make their instrument sing, I'm more drawn to chord melody and lush arrangements. That's what I spend all of my time practicing these days.
 

sleep

Supporting Member
Messages
2,900
Obviously there are a few gifted souls who seem to be able to be pretty good at playing in just about any style, but they tend to also be focused pros without day jobs. I'm realizing in order to make progress I'm going to have to narrow my focus, but I dabble in several somewhat unrelated styles. I see advantages to and would enjoy going several different directions, but I really don't have time both long or short term to really make progress without making a decision. Anyone else face this issue, and if so, did you resolve it?
Some of the truly great rock and roll albums are great because they didn't pick a style. Led Zeppelin and the Beatles come to mind, and one thing they have in common is they seem to have done whatever they wanted. I also think that many newer bands have very short shelf lives BECAUSE they pick a style that dies when the style is no longer popular.

I vote for not picking a style, for playing what you want to hear, and, as corny as it sounds, focusing on being the best at sounding like yourself. 'Getting good' is relative, and there will always be someone better at one thing or another, the competition is with yourself.
 




Top