Did your dad build...

MKB

Gold Supporting Member
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My dad made quite a few Eico and Heathkit stereo kits, I still have his Eico ST40 (iirc its name) with the near unobtainable Sylvania 7591A's.

I wonder what my kids would say if you asked them... All my home stereos have been hand made for decades. No kits.
 

loudboy

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27,335
we had all kindsa bits & bobs everywhere!, back when my dad was designing amps & systems for the old Harman-Kardon.
and many, many "audiophile" system-testing LP's, too.
Did you have the one where the train went from one side to the other? Maybe an RCA Test Record? I remember that vividly from when I was a wee lad...
 

saxophonist56

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3,892
my dad built a really nice stereo 70 which got modded to be even nicer. then a mover stole it!!! i still have the pas2 preamp he built. that stereo was so nice in the living room....AR2AX's powered by the st-70 and pas2 pre. he also built our tv from heathkit i think. i built a a solid state receiver from heathkit. someday i will build a guitar amp. the guy at work from holland found a jim marshall schematic online and built his own from scratch. that impressed me.
 
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specialidiot

most likely to seceede
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I have an Eico HF-81 in use at our lake place. I took it in a few years ago as a basket case and it took me over a year to rebuild. Yes including diassembling and cleaning all of those nasty wafer switches. I made some mods to it with the help of ma mad-scientist buddy, including a solid state rectified DC screen regulator.

It sounds incredible. I'll have to see if I have any images online. Another woodworking friend had to build me a new enclosure too, as the old one was pretty crusty.
 

tonewoody

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1,656
Nice thread, brings up good memories.

My dad is a professional electrical engineer and ham radio enthusiast from way back. We never had much in the way of audio gear that looked fancy but a fair bit of it was homebuilt from first class designs.

Funny, lately I have been thinking about how the old tube receiver and large speaker cabinets captured my interest in sound. Growing up with big fat warm tube audio and taking it for granted.

I f'n loved the "Loudness" button on the old tube receivers. Loved it!
 

Rex Anderson

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5,066
I'm 63. My dad was a Marine Sergeant and radar technician in WWII. He repaired our TV's when they had tubes in them, he brought home his tube tester from the service! I'll never forget watching him work behind the TV when I was a young kid. The glow of those tubes was awesome.

I built and serviced a lot of stuff (tape recorders, mixing consoles, amps, preamps, microphones etc) while working as a professional recording and live sound engineer for 40+ years.

An Electrical Engineering professor helped me learn a lot about circuits, building and troubleshooting. Great guy, I would not have done nearly as well without him.
 

Budman2k

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967
I still have the first amp my dad built for me. And it still works! I think it was a Heathkit but not 100% sure. It appears to be based on the Fender 5E3.
 

rstites

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1,636
My dad's stereo was all home built. The system was Dynaco. The speakers were built from plans he purchased.

He built everything in high school, so I wasn't around to watch and never really appreciated until later in life. Sadly, he ditched all of that around 1980 for an updated system. I wish he would have held onto that.

His uncle built an entire system from scratch in the 1950s, including grinding his own turntable. I still own oscilloscope that uncle built.
 

doc

Silver Supporting Member
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7,130
I still have the Dynaco ST-70 my dad built. It was one of the first amps I played my electric through. I'm a little upset with myself thinking about it, as I have a very hard time leaving anything alone - a number of years back I read some stuff by Van Alstine and started modding it to sound better. I never did get all the mods done, so its still sitting here. I should have just replaced the selenium rectifier and left the rest alone. Eventually I'll finish redoing it.
 

scott944

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3,935
We were still using a tube receiver and integrated amp that my dad built in the early 60's, when I was in college in the early 80's. When I graduated and moved out in '84, I took the receiver with me and used it for several years. Don't recall the kit name.
 

fataxeman

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2,134
My dad never really had many power tools. That may help explain my total ineptitude around anything more than a screwdriver! However, "we" did build a pair of speakers back in the day.

This was around '75-'76 as I recall taking the speakers off to community college after graduating high school in '76. There was a Lafayette electronics store in Boone, N.C. where we lived. I don't remember anything about the electronics they sold but I remember going in there and ogling a Garrard Z-100c turntable.

I'm not sure Lafayette was associated with Allied Electronics but it seems the speakers i bought were the brand name Utah. I used to pour over the catalog and these Utah speakers seemed to often/always offer a "buy one at regular price, get the 2nd speaker free (or maybe a $1)."

The speakers I bought were "triaxial"...I think that is the term. They were Utah 12 inch 3-ways with the midrange and tweeter mounted at the center of the woofer cone. I don't recall if we had any actual plans being pre-cell phone/pre-internet....even pre-disco (as far as I knew).

We built the speaker out of plywood I guess but remember we used a hand saw to cut the lumber! Let's just say the tolerances were pretty large but I was proud of them and had one of the better stereos at school.

Good times! Thanks Dad. (RIP)
 
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Tonekat

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8,815
No audio stuff, but he built his first TV from a kit. It had been relegated to the basement by the time I knew about it. Round screen, all that.
 

Mark Robinson

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8,596
My dad built a Dynaco FM tuner that we used for a long time. My father-in-law, built a Heathkit pre and a pair of mono block 6L6 amps we have to this day tucked away in my studio. Also have a pair of huge but underwhelming speakers he built, haven't tossed me yet, cause I know he spent a ton of time on them.
 

mark123

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1,056
My dad was a NASA engineer/scientist, he spent many years sitting in rooms with those big old real to real computer tape recorders that you would see in the old science fiction movies. What they don't show in the movies is how dam loud those recorders were. They literally had a dam vacuum that sucked the tape onto the heads of the recorder. It wiped out his high frequency hearing. As a kid I remember having a old 25" console TV set that was making a nasty electrical noise but my dad couldn't hear it. We finally got him to pull the back off the TV set and it was shooting a arc off the yoke of the TV tube to the ground strap. Kinda looked like a Tesla coil. He had it fixed in a heartbeat but never actually heard the arcing taking place.

My dad never did build stereo kits but did build some ON-TV and Select-TV decoder boxes back in the day. Hats off to you if you can remember what On-Tv and Select-TV were. My grandfather was a ham radio operator and build his own equipment from plans or Heathkit kits. Neither one of them really got into audio though.
 

johnspeck

Member
Messages
1,270
My dad was a NASA engineer/scientist, he spent many years sitting in rooms with those big old real to real computer tape recorders that you would see in the old science fiction movies. What they don't show in the movies is how dam loud those recorders were. They literally had a dam vacuum that sucked the tape onto the heads of the recorder. It wiped out his high frequency hearing. As a kid I remember having a old 25" console TV set that was making a nasty electrical noise but my dad couldn't hear it. We finally got him to pull the back off the TV set and it was shooting a arc off the yoke of the TV tube to the ground strap. Kinda looked like a Tesla coil. He had it fixed in a heartbeat but never actually heard the arcing taking place.

My dad never did build stereo kits but did build some ON-TV and Select-TV decoder boxes back in the day. Hats off to you if you can remember what On-Tv and Select-TV were. My grandfather was a ham radio operator and build his own equipment from plans or Heathkit kits. Neither one of them really got into audio though.
My Grandma had ON-TV, my first cable experience. I saw Queen live in concert on it.
 




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