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Digital glossary of terms and abbreviations

The Captain

Senior Member
Messages
12,790
I'm new to this world, and I can't understand half the posts because of use of abbreviations.
A couple that have me stumped are "FRFR" and "IR loading".
Anyone want to elaborate for me ?
 

The Captain

Senior Member
Messages
12,790
FRFR= Full Range Flat Responce.

IR= Impulse Response.

OK, so FRFR obviously means a PA system or amp that is not going to colour the sound, but "impulse response" does not tell me much.

Edit, I used it as a search term., and I think I'm starting to understand it. This is why I'm trending toward the Amplitube MAX, which is loaded with specific patches, so I won't have to understand much or tweak too much. I'm not techy or tweaky.
 

nicolasrivera

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
6,800
OK, so FRFR obviously means a PA system or amp that is not going to colour the sound, but "impulse response" does not tell me much.

Edit, I used it as a search term., and I think I'm starting to understand it. This is why I'm trending toward the Amplitube MAX, which is loaded with specific patches, so I won't have to understand much or tweak too much. I'm not techy or tweaky.
GLWYDMS.
 

kleydj13

Member
Messages
1,607
Most modelers process your signal. They do amp modeling to provide gain structure, EQ, or add effects. But few actually 'amplify' the signal (make it louder). So FRFR is a solution to allow the modeler complete control over the tone, and then the FRFR amplifies it and produces it through a speaker in a way that is a neutral and true to the source as possible. The alternative approach would be to use a power amp and a typical guitar cabinet. You give up some of the flexibility as you are locked into a single cabinet's tone, but it will be similar to using a traditional amp. An FRFR setup is very much like being in a studio and listening to the sound of an amp mic'd in another room. Examples of FRFR choices would be powered PA speakers, Studio Monitors, and headphones. Many of these options aren't necessarily 'modeling' specific choices. There is a lot of overlap with live sound or studio recording, because the goals are similar.

Impulse Response is a pretty complex type of signal processing. The modeling world has adapted it for use to recreate the sound of guitar speaker cabinets. Think of a speaker in terms of an EQ filter like this:



An IR allows you to take a speaker cabinet. Figure out what exactly the EQ response is. And put it into a format that a software host can use to recreate that effect.

In my experience, speakers are a very important tone shaping tool - and the accuracy of a modeler very much depends on the speaker modeling. IRs have proven to be very effective for this task. More information and examples from a great video by Pete Thorn here:


He is using it in the context of a tube amp - load box - interface / DAW. However the same basic idea is used with amp modeling. I'd even argue that amp modelers use this technology even better as the signal is already digital and you simply need to choose a modeler capable of hosting 3rd party IRs. For me personally, this feature is 100% required and separates what I would consider lower end modelers from higher end. To take it a step further, one of my favorite ways to get more mileage out of a cheaper modeler like my Zoom G3X is to disable the stock speaker cab modeling and use IRs in a DAW.
 

burningyen

Member
Messages
14,894
4CM = four-cable method of connecting a modeler to a tube amp with an FX loop, where your cables go:

Cable #1: guitar->modeler input
Cable #2: modeler send->amp input
Cable #3: amp FX loop send->modeler return
Cable #4: modeler output->amp FX loop return

This lets you switch between your amp's preamp and the modeler's amp modeling, if you want.
 

rsm

Senior Member
Messages
14,081
DF = Digital Fizz = something you hear, or think you hear when using digital modelers. As the cost of your modeler goes up, the less you hear DF i.e., the apparent DF decreases proportionately with increasing cost of your modeler. The term is most often used by guitarists who tried / heard a modeler once, 5+ years ago and have based all subsequent opinions on that experience ignoring facts such as improvement over time similar to other electronic / digital / software devices

aka Digital Artifacts (DA)
 

The Captain

Senior Member
Messages
12,790
Thank you. That was the impression I got from the bit of reading I did after I got the term "impulse response" up higher. That was an impressive post. I'm feeling a thread like this would be valuable as a sticky. Thank you everyone else for your other posts.
I am planning on getting Amplitude, and using headphones or just running it though a Bose Companion 5 powered speaker set. It does not need to replace my tube monsters, just be an extra option for travel or late night practice in apartment accomodation.
Can I assume that the Amplitude is loaded with the relevant IR maps ?


Most modelers process your signal. They do amp modeling to provide gain structure, EQ, or add effects. But few actually 'amplify' the signal (make it louder). So FRFR is a solution to allow the modeler complete control over the tone, and then the FRFR amplifies it and produces it through a speaker in a way that is a neutral and true to the source as possible. The alternative approach would be to use a power amp and a typical guitar cabinet. You give up some of the flexibility as you are locked into a single cabinet's tone, but it will be similar to using a traditional amp. An FRFR setup is very much like being in a studio and listening to the sound of an amp mic'd in another room. Examples of FRFR choices would be powered PA speakers, Studio Monitors, and headphones. Many of these options aren't necessarily 'modeling' specific choices. There is a lot of overlap with live sound or studio recording, because the goals are similar.

Impulse Response is a pretty complex type of signal processing. The modeling world has adapted it for use to recreate the sound of guitar speaker cabinets. Think of a speaker in terms of an EQ filter like this:



An IR allows you to take a speaker cabinet. Figure out what exactly the EQ response is. And put it into a format that a software host can use to recreate that effect.

In my experience, speakers are a very important tone shaping tool - and the accuracy of a modeler very much depends on the speaker modeling. IRs have proven to be very effective for this task. More information and examples from a great video by Pete Thorn here:


He is using it in the context of a tube amp - load box - interface / DAW. However the same basic idea is used with amp modeling. I'd even argue that amp modelers use this technology even better as the signal is already digital and you simply need to choose a modeler capable of hosting 3rd party IRs. For me personally, this feature is 100% required and separates what I would consider lower end modelers from higher end. To take it a step further, one of my favorite ways to get more mileage out of a cheaper modeler like my Zoom G3X is to disable the stock speaker cab modeling and use IRs in a DAW.
 






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