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Dinky?

seward

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,379
Just picked up my new Jackson Pro Dinky (mahogany natural hard tail) from FedEx.

It's absolutely beautiful. Looks even better than pictures; first visual scan indicates no issues. Somewhat speechless. It's the honeymoon, of course, but at the moment, having just pushed some gain through the bridge JB...will be away from keyboard for a bit. NGD thread incoming if I can take photos that do it justice...I am not paid by Jackson to say this...

tl;dr: YES I'LL TAKE PICTURES
 

slo100

Member
Messages
156
Some purists prefer the original San Dimas Charvel dinky shape that can be traced back to 1981. Perhaps the most prominent/famous example of the short horn, original dinky strat shape is Warren DeMartini's white "Frenchie" Charvel. Not the first, by any means, but possibly the most famous. Steve Stevens' glow in the dark dinky is another. Over the years the shape has changed with elongated horns and different body contours as noted above. Today, even the Charvel produced "Frenchie" replicas inexplicably do not use the original spec shape.

I like the orignal short horn spec.
 

seward

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,379
I like the orignal short horn spec.
If that's the feature that I'm thinking of, then it's one the reasons I love Charvel bodies. It sounds like it's the older bodies that I like. Nice, simple, kinda blocky strat shape. It does look like the San Dimas has gotten sleeker and pointier over time. I don't know if it's controversial or not, but I also really like the Fender-ish headstock (which they can do because etc.).

From the Charvel website, it seems like the only difference between San Dimas and So Cal today is the pickups.
 

seward

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,379
I'm gonna do an NGD thread with photos, but for now, I gotta say, this guitar - Jackson Pro Dinky HT, mahogany natural - is much more than I was expecting, beginning with build quality and looks. It definitely leans toward softer edges and less pointy horns, unlike my Ibanez RG Prestige. The unpainted wood is gorgeous. Sounds good enough to have spent last night risking phone calls from neighbors - could not stop.

Easily a $900 guitar - seems to fall right in between my RG Prestige and the RG Standard I had - and I did not pay $900. It's still available at ridiculous clearance prices, but not from retailers that I am familiar with and would vouch for.

I haven't previously been able to take advantage of clearance sales. Feels good.
 

CaptNasty

Guitar Geek
Double Platinum Member
Messages
1,025
I had a USA Custom Shop Soloist in Natural Roasted Mahogany. The advice I would give you for a natural mahogany guitar is to never handle it with dirty or greasy hands. That mahogany will suck up dirts and oils like crazy. Also keep it cased if you are not playing it, it will pick up odors from the environment.
 

sleewell

Senior Member
Messages
10,588
my current #1 is a cheapo Indonesian made dinky 7 string. i put in hipshot locking tuners and BKP war pigs and that guitar is flat out amazing.
 

seward

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,379
I had a USA Custom Shop Soloist in Natural Roasted Mahogany. The advice I would give you for a natural mahogany guitar is to never handle it with dirty or greasy hands. That mahogany will suck up dirts and oils like crazy. Also keep it cased if you are not playing it, it will pick up odors from the environment.
I noticed this with a mahogany ESP LTD. Came from the factory over-oiled. Someone shoulda told the guy to stop. It wasn't actually greasy or anything, just looked all oiled up - saturated. Fine guitar otherwise.
 

Shiva

Member
Messages
222
Some purists prefer the original San Dimas Charvel dinky shape that can be traced back to 1981. Perhaps the most prominent/famous example of the short horn, original dinky strat shape is Warren DeMartini's white "Frenchie" Charvel. Not the first, by any means, but possibly the most famous. Steve Stevens' glow in the dark dinky is another. Over the years the shape has changed with elongated horns and different body contours as noted above. Today, even the Charvel produced "Frenchie" replicas inexplicably do not use the original spec shape.

I like the orignal short horn spec.

Yep, I much prefer the original Charvel dinky shape from the early to mid 80s. I really wish Charvel hadn't strayed so far from this original design. The guys at Charvel still have the template of that original dinky body, but for some reason, over the last several years, only a few custom orders with this original dinky shape have been made.

To my eyes, the body on a Suhr Standard or Tom Anderson drop top is closer to the original Charvel dinky shape than what Charvel is now calling a dinky.
 

ruger9

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,817
Still love my dinky from '89. Model 3DR (Model 3, Dinky, Reverse Headstock)...

I put a JB in the bridge (back in the day), and routed the single coil out for a humbucker (currently has a Dimarzio HFH in there for that single-coil sound). I did have to replace the Jackson Floyd, it literally fell apart lol.

It's neck is my all-time favorite, even 30 years later.

 

CaptNasty

Guitar Geek
Double Platinum Member
Messages
1,025
The “short horn” versus “long horn” is not about age or era that the guitar was built in. It is the result of the number of frets.

Jackson and Charvel strats have a 25.5” scale length. This means the distance from the nut to the saddle is 25.5”. Regardless of number of frets on the neck the 12th fret must be located at half that distance: 12.75” - in other words at the mid point between the bridge and the nut. Since the neck cannot be relocated due to the requirements dictated by the scale length, the neck pocket has to be relocated on the body to compensate for neck length. To accomodate this shorter necks require a longer body at the neck joint. Conversely longer necks allow a shorter body at the neck joint.

On a 24 fret guitar the neck is longer and goes deeper into the body. As a result more of the body can be removed at the upper horn while still being able to securely attach the neck. The neck joint can also move towards the bridge. Note that on 24 fret Jacksons and Charvels the upper horn meets the neck around the 19th fret. This results in the “long upper horn”.

On a 21/22 fret guitar the neck is shorter and a longer body is needed to securely attach the neck to the guitar. The neck joint has to move towards the headstock due to the shorter neck. Note that on 22 fret Charvels and Jacksons the upper horn meets the neck around the 17th fret. A 21 fret guitar would have the neck and upper horn meet around the 16th fret. This results in the “short upper horn”.

The shorter the horn the harder upper fret access becomes due to the neck/body joint being closer to the headstock. The aesthetics of the upper horn are not important to me, the upper fret access is what I care about.
 
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bman5150us

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
895
CapNasty- thank you for that very detailed explanation. You just very articulately described why I prefer most 24 fret guitars over 22-access to the upper frets. I absolutely love the San Dimas Style 1 look but couldn’t live with fighting access to solo in A pentatonic-a super common key for songs. I suppose I could get used to it but ahhhh-just going to get that Charvel DK24 HSS FR soon when they come out.
 

CaptNasty

Guitar Geek
Double Platinum Member
Messages
1,025
CapNasty- thank you for that very detailed explanation. You just very articulately described why I prefer most 24 fret guitars over 22-access to the upper frets. I absolutely love the San Dimas Style 1 look but couldn’t live with fighting access to solo in A pentatonic-a super common key for songs. I suppose I could get used to it but ahhhh-just going to get that Charvel DK24 HSS FR soon when they come out.
The funny thing is that I rarely use the 23rd or 24th frets. I do use the 21st and 22nd frets every time I play. For me, having a 24 fret guitar is about easier access to the 21st and 22nd frets.
 

xzacx

Member
Messages
1,602
The funny thing is that I rarely use the 23rd or 24th frets. I do use the 21st and 22nd frets every time I play. For me, having a 24 fret guitar is about easier access to the 21st and 22nd frets.
I really can't think of a benefit of a 21 or 22 fret guitar in this genre. If I'm that particular about really needing closer pickup placement for the perfect warm neck position, a 25.5" superstrat sure isn't the guitar I'm going to use.
 

PatriotBadger

Senior Member
Messages
1,808
Didums gets a dinky poo-poo? Didums??

Sorry, the third grade humor is never more than a breath away with me.
 

bman5150us

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
895
The funny thing is that I rarely use the 23rd or 24th frets. I do use the 21st and 22nd frets every time I play. For me, having a 24 fret guitar is about easier access to the 21st and 22nd frets.
completely agree.

And of course, it’s also what you are used to. My mother bought me a Washburn 24 fret super strat when I was 18 and graduated high school. It’s still my main guitar today 30 years later.

But I do have two 22 fret guitars that don’t present a problem for high fretboard access- Peavey Wolfgang standard and a Fender Tele. In fact, most gigs I use the telephone and the Washburn. It’s all in the design of the horn and the body as well.
 
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Shiva

Member
Messages
222
If I'm going with 24 frets, I'd want the body shape to be like Charvel's Guthrie Govan model.

The new 22 fret SSS Charvels I played at Namm last month felt great in my hands, but visually, the body shape just doesn't work for me. If they were old school Charvel dinky shaped, I'd probably grab a couple of them.
 




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