Disney Songwriters - how does it work?

stratotastic

Member
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7,243
My band's working out Party In The USA (Miley Cyrus) for a chick sit-in next week. Say what you want about Miley, autotune, etc, it's an extremely well-crafted tune with great hooks, arrangement, production, fun lyrics that 4 to 40 year-olds can enjoy, etc. That got me wondering how the whole Disney song ghostwriter thing works. Is there an office somewhere where some industry folks sit around a conference table writing songs? Who are these people? Where do they come from? How do they get into that scene? Are they provided with flow charts of certain formulas they're supposed to follow? Is it just a bunch of freelancers that submit thousands of song bids which are reviewed and picked by some executive board? Do the songs have to go through upper management reviews before being given to the band/singer to record? Just curious...
 

taez555

Member
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8,043
It's not Disney songwriters. The song was written by Dr Luke, Claude Kelly and Jessica Cornish. It's basically the same people who write all the hit songs for Kelly Clarkson, Ke$ha, Adam Lambert, Britney Spears, Katy Perry, etc, etc. "Tik Tok", "Hot & Cold", "Since you been gone" "I Kissed a girl". All the same people.

Those guys, and a couple other songwriters, have the market cornered on writing all the current Pop tunes. I wouldn't be surprised if Disney just doesn't go right to them and says "work your magic, produce us another mega hit".
 

smallbutmighty

Supporting Member
Messages
9,064
It's not Disney songwriters. The song was written by Dr Luke, Claude Kelly and Jessica Cornish. It's basically the same people who write all the hit songs for Kelly Clarkson, Ke$ha, Adam Lambert, Britney Spears, Katy Perry, etc, etc. "Tik Tok", "Hot & Cold", "Since you been gone" "I Kissed a girl". All the same people.

Those guys, and a couple other songwriters, have the market cornered on writing all the current Pop tunes. I wouldn't be surprised if Disney just doesn't go right to them and says "work your magic, produce us another mega hit".
Yep. It's no different than any other market in the "independent songwriter world". You've got a handful of great songwriters that:

1. Know how to write hit songs in their sleep. This is not following a paint-by-numbers "formula". It is an deep understanding of the craft of songwriting, honed by working on literally thousands of songs.

2. Have the connections to get their songs heard by the people making the decisions. As tough as #1 is, #2 is even tougher.

If you are among the many that think "all pop songs today sound the same", you've just found one of the reasons why: this handful of highly talented songwriters writes the majority of it. Another reason: often these writers collaborate. Songs written by committee have a tendency to end up sounding "samey".

There are TONS of songwriters out there that can write great tunes, but sadly they fall short on #2. And for Disney's part, why would they be motivated to go through the hassle of sifting though unknowns when they can quickly and easily (read: cheaply) go to a stable of guaranteed hit-makers?
 
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Aj_rocker

Member
Messages
1,268
simple: disney send out to music publishers a song request. which in turn they email out to their writers. the writers either write something new or find a song they have writen. this is submitted back to the publish who inturn, "pitch" the song to disney. If disney want said song contracts are draw up and signed. That said the A and R at disney might receieve 2000 songs and then pick one or a hand full from that list which is then recorded and they then decide what songs to put on the album/ make singles/ use on tv/etc.

thats the basics of course if your pitching for a artist like miley the publishers are only going to submit those writers who everyone else is using (e.g. Dr Luke/the martix/etc) and not some unown.

Aj
 

Bryan T

guitar owner
Messages
19,934
I'm intrigued by Dr. Luke. If I remember correctly, he was a guitarist on SNL for years, but has shifted over to writing/producing pop music. I wonder if he's been on The Gear Page?
 




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