DMM: no good with distortion?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by 6stringgrind, Mar 14, 2008.

  1. 6stringgrind

    6stringgrind Member

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    I've never owned any delay pedal other than the Deluxe Memory man. I love the sound of this pedal when playing with a relatively clean tone, but I find it unusable when using much distortion. I want to use delay for rock and metal solos. Is the DMM the wrong pedal for that application, or is it just me? Is that a job more suited for a digital delay pedal?
     
  2. gtrfinder

    gtrfinder Supporting Member

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    It might not be the best choice for heavily distorted sounds. The darker analog voice of the Memory Man combined with modulation could lead to some mushiness with the gain cranked up.

    Does your amp have an FX Loop?
    If so I'd consider trying the Memory Man in the loop.
     
  3. 6stringgrind

    6stringgrind Member

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    I've never used the FX loop on any of my amps, ever. I've always run everything through the front end. Maybe I'll give that a try.
     
  4. Angle Loss

    Angle Loss Supporting Member

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    I think the DMM is absolutely suited for distorted leads! First make sure that your distortion is before your DMM, or else it will sound bad (just like any delay). Take it easy on the chorusing, and dial in to taste. Letting us know your setup and rig would help. The warmth of the DMM helps the delay to not interfere with your solos as sometimes digital delays do.
     
  5. TheGigPig

    TheGigPig Member

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    I love the direct sound in my memory man, but the tone i use, although it does get heavy, i wouldn't call it metal. Setting the input gain on the MM is the key to getting the most out of it. The best tone imo is setting it for unity gain, not overloading it for a boost. Remember that it's an INPUT gain, not a master volume. If you need to boost the level, use a transparent boost AFTER the delay. Set like this it can certainly handle anything i throw it including a stacked COT into a Landgraff MOD. And THAT is a very heavy tone.
     
  6. fearhk213

    fearhk213 Member

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    +1
    I have one and it works great for the stuff you're looking to do, but it's essential that you put it in the loop. It will sound like pure mess in front of your distortion.
     
  7. 12guitdown

    12guitdown Member

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    +1 Just run it post distortion. no issues with mine. These guys gotcha covered.
     
  8. monkeyland

    monkeyland Member

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    i love my DMM and use it all of the time behind a rat and a big muff and it always sounds great. the sound that you are hearing in your head though may be a product of a cleaner digital delay
     
  9. Sniper-V

    Sniper-V Member

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    I have to agree with the OP considering he/she is running the DMM in most optimal signal chain order in which the delays are put after preamps and ODs/Distortions. I feel the DMM does sound best under cleaner tones in comparison to higher gained stuff. For some reason the DMM seems to alter the way drive tones sound or react and it turns into a sloppy mess. Doesn't stay together well and seems very spikey or harsh. At least to my ears.

    I dig my Memory Lane for just about all my analog needs. Although it doesn't have the equivalent modulation abilities as the DMM, it makes up with being able to deliver true analog delay tones at any gain setting and with TAP.
     

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