Do 1, 2, and 3-knob reverbs cover the same bases as multi-knobs?

BluebirdJo

Member
Messages
19
I've got a stereo WET reverb pedal that knocked off my Hall of Fame, but I kind of miss going straight to things like "church" or "plate" and then tweaking from there.

I know different pedals have different frequency ranges and resonances (if that's putting it right), and each reverb pedal has a different character. I'm just wondering if the knobs on pedals that have choices like "spring" or "plate" are basically shortcuts, and you can get the same sounds with pedals that only have 1, 2, or 3 knobs by experimenting and tweaking?
 

NHBluesMan

Member
Messages
6,141
typically not- if a pedal only has 2 or 3 knobs then most likely it's one basic reverb sound (spring, hall, ambient) and then you tweak the parameters of that specific sound. You can get close by adjusting knobs, but you won't be able to get 100% there
 

thiscalltoarms

more gadgets than Batman.
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
8,084
I've got a stereo WET reverb pedal that knocked off my Hall of Fame, but I kind of miss going straight to things like "church" or "plate" and then tweaking from there.

I know different pedals have different frequency ranges and resonances (if that's putting it right), and each reverb pedal has a different character. I'm just wondering if the knobs on pedals that have choices like "spring" or "plate" are basically shortcuts, and you can get the same sounds with pedals that only have 1, 2, or 3 knobs by experimenting and tweaking?
Not really, if you find you need many different types of reverb then you need a reverb pedal with multiple types of verb. Spring/plate/room all sound quite different from each other for example, and none if them really sound like the wet which is more of an ambient cross between plate attack with room diffusion.
 

Rumble

Instrumental Rocker
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,517
Could never remember all the variables on my 5 knob Tech 21 Boost/RVB to go from one reverb type to the next (was a nice reverb pedal though). The preset variants are better since they get you in the ballpark quicker, with less knob tweaking. There's nothing wrong with having both types on a board though (space willing). Since spring is all I care about, I now just use a Peavey Valverb in unison with a Boss FRV-1.
 

BluebirdJo

Member
Messages
19
Thanks! I'm going to add an Arena. The two new settings on it replace 2 I didn't really use on the HOF.
 

la noise

Senior Member
Messages
21,156
The Arena is a great reverb. I prefered it to the HOF.
The Royal Albert Hall preset is awesome.... and you still have the Spring, Plate, and Church. :aok
 

nb2rock

Member
Messages
89
I've got the Strymon BigSky and love having the amount of control it offers to sculpt the sound of the verb. Then again, I'm a bit of a control freak. Having the ability to turn a knob to switch from plate, spring, hall, room, shimmer etc. is awesome. And it's midi controllable, which opens up a lot of doors when working with mainstage or logic or any daw for that matter. Imagine being able to have your decay time or overall wet/dry change while you're playing through a song, or shut the reverb off entirely at certain parts of the song. Pretty wicked
 

BluebirdJo

Member
Messages
19
I just looked up the midi option on the Strymon site . . . that sounds really interesting.

The demos seem to concentrate on the ambient sound factor and leave out showing how the pedal does with harder rock. I read an article that mentioned the BlueSky does great with crunch tones and responds well to higher gain amps, so hard rock and metal players should look into it. That makes me think again about the BlueSky, because I always come back to gassing for it and then don't get it because of the cost. I guess it would be cheaper to just go for what you want instead of flipping pedals! The article about the BlueSky - and it's a long, involved review - is at http://www.dinosaurrockguitar.com/new/node/923
 




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