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Do I have to inform a buyer about potential conflicts with his setup when selling a pedal?

Dud

Member
Messages
49
of course you don't have to do all of the buyer's research for them.

but all else equal being equal I'd rather buy from a more considerate seller who shares as much relevant info as they have than one who doesn't.

i'm guilty of not always doing exhaustive due diligence on every purchase i've ever made. golden rule applies: i would want a seller to look out for me a little, so i would try to look out for them a little, too.
 

LqdSndDist

Member
Messages
1,336
There are a lot of dumb people in the world, there are also a lot of guitar players....

it makes sense then that there are a lot of dumb guitar players too. Maybe even more so than other instruments I dare say....besides bass, drummers and vocalist of course
 

Shiny_Beast

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
10,078
It wouldn't have crossed my mind in a million years, but I don't sell a lot of pedals, once bitten twice shy I guess.
 

Radspin

Member
Messages
1,147
I sometimes sell on Reverb (I gave up on eBay) and write very detailed descriptions and take a lot of photos, with an eye towards what a seller might find as an issue. I also offer seven day returns. No one’s returned a pedal yet. I find it’s better to over-describe. Also, as a buyer I like detailed descriptions as opposed to something like “works fine. Velcro on bottom” and only a picture of the top of the pedal, for example.
 

tubekingsley

Member
Messages
2,979
I mean talking about pedals and impedance issues with fuzz faces and buffers.

Im pretty sure Jimi Hendrix used a buffer in his wah...

And well this was before his Fuzz Face

I may be wrong here but Roger Mayer defintaley knows.

Have to go back and listen to Are you Experienced stuff. But it kind of worked for him and well yeah.

I dont get this whole dont put a buffer before a fuzz thing. Never made sense to me.

Sometimes it makes sense the geeking out other times its just stuff that doesnt and its just geeking out for geeking out.

Buffers are totally fine before a fuzz tough IME relating to OPs first post.

People just be peopleing.....

Doing their people thing.


People :)
Jimi used pull down resistors in his wah pedals output, (or fuzz face input)- same as a fuzz friendly buffer, different than a standard buffer that produces low impedance signal.
A buffer before a fuzz face affects it's ability to clean up with guitar volume knob, and can make it sound bright and weird
 
Last edited:
Messages
3,364
There are so many stupid / dishonest / annoying
people in the world,
that if you try and sell more than just a few things,
you will be bombarded with
idiotic questions & rude comments.

One of the reasons that I am intending to not
buy any new pedals in 2020,
is that I am sick of dealing with morons,
when trying to sell pedals I no longer want / need.

It just ain't worth it.
 

ellsworthman

The Geezer of Gear
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
11,588
You're not a store. It's not your duty to figure out what's going to work/not work in their rig. If it doesn't meet their needs, they can move the pedal on.
A lot of people would move it on, but there seem to be a growing number of buyers who think all sellers should let them return for any reason.
There are so many stupid / dishonest / annoying
people in the world,
that if you try and sell more than just a few things,
you will be bombarded with
idiotic questions & rude comments.

One of the reasons that I am intending to not
buy any new pedals in 2020,
is that I am sick of dealing with morons,
when trying to sell pedals I no longer want / need.

It just ain't worth it.
I vowed not to sell any because of the increase in people I saw looking for any excuse for a return.

Unfortunately I made no vow to stop buying. I will soon need more shelves.
 
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Messages
3,364
A lot of people would move it on, but there seem to be a growing number of buyers who think all sellers should let them return for any reason.

I vowed not to sell any because of the increase in people I saw looking for any excuse for a return.
Unfortunately I made no vow to stop buying. I will soon need more shelves.
Yep - they want to treat honest sellers / retailers,
like some kind of "guitar pedal library".

Might be easier to just admit defeat,
and list gear "for rent" instead of "for sale".

And to the asshat, that keeps messaging me,
about the same pedal, saying
"I guess you aren't really motivated to sell it."

Yes - I am motivated to sell it.
Just not to you, for your low ball offers.

So kindly pissoff.
 

whackystrings

Member
Messages
3,855
When I post ads on craigslist, I usually include a link to the manufacturer's product webpage and to the online manual. I don't want to spoonfeed people nor do I want to deal with incessant after-sales RTFM childish inquiries. If someone fries a pedal because they used the wrong polarity, then in their mind I sold them a dud pedal and the conflict begins. I would rather sell my thing to a *relatively* informed customer that doesn't want to harass me afterwards because he was not aware and did not RTFM. Whether you want to focus on the ethics or not, most would agree that conflict prevention is beneficial for all parties.
 

tubekingsley

Member
Messages
2,979
I've been selling pedals for well over 10 years on different platforms: eBay, Facebook, some smaller forums and lately on Reverb. I rarely run into any problems with buyers, never got screwed and even when there is a conflict I always get it sorted out for both sides.

But once in a while there's that guy coming up. I'm talking about the guy that buys my fancy new boutique pedal and after receiving it gets back to me either insisting that the pedal is broken or that it has a feature that he wasn't aware of. Every single time I had this happen it turned out to be user error.

Some examples from the last 2 years or so:
- Sold a Rangemaster style pedal to somebody. He gets back to me reporting that battery works, but dc jack isn't working. After some back and forth it turns out he's using a non-isolated power supply (isolated as in galvanic isolated). I tell him the pedal is producing a short and that it's common for Treble Boosters to use PNP transistors, so either he should run it on batteries like the rest of the world or get a new power supply. Arguably he didn't want to invest in a new power supply, so asked if he could return it.
- Sold a Fuzz Face to another guy. He gets back to me reporting the pedal sounds nothing like the demos and that it's most likely broken. Turns out he's using it after a buffer. I tell him to run it in front of the buffer. He tells me he wasn't aware of the effect of impedance and that he would like to return the pedal.
- Sold another Fuzz Face style pedal to another guy. I won't mention the brand but their fuzz pedals don't come with a dc jack unless you custom order. He wasn't aware of that and admitted that it was an impulse purchase, because the price was good, so he didn't even read up on the pedal. He asked to return the pedal, as well.

I basically told all three of them to f*ck off (but in a nice way). The thing is I know all three of them from different forums and I'd say they're (somewhat) experienced pedal users. So I don't even think it's just buyer's remorse, but they simply didn't know any better.

Do I have to inform buyers about such potential conflicts? For me it's common knowledge that PNP circuits react that way and the way those pedals are built, although I can totally see how one could run into such problems when it's your first time with those kind of circuits. However, I think you as a buyer should do some research before droping 200-300$ on a boutique fuzz.

How would you handle this kind of situation?
1) requires isolated power= obligated
2) buffer before fuzz= not obligated
3) mention no power jack in listing, even if pictures show it has no jack
 

JDandCoke

Member
Messages
1,949
You're selling a pedal, not a pedal design tutorial. Tell them to suck eggs.

Part of buying pedals is learning what works and what doesn't. No responsibility on you as long as the pedal works as it was designed to.
 
Messages
12,529
There are a lot of dumb people in the world, there are also a lot of guitar players....

it makes sense then that there are a lot of dumb guitar players too. Maybe even more so than other instruments I dare say....besides bass, drummers and vocalist of course
Now wait just a gal darn minute. There has to be a triangle player somewhere dummer than me.
 

MmcGrouty

Member
Messages
3,866
If there’s anything out of the ordinary, I’ll put it in the description. That way I’m covered. People are dumb and uninformed, you can’t expect them to do research.
 
Messages
12,529
If I think of obvious considerate or informative things I would mention them. The idea is to have a buyer's back a little bit.

But in no way would I accept responsibility for every nuance of proper gear usage.

If you attempt to strike that balance in good faith, that seems enough.

Stating a thoughtful returns policy seems like a great idea.

But I dislike both extremes: Either manipulative buyers expecting you to have explained how to use fuzzes on one hand, and on the other hand, sellers who think "buy it or don't, not my problem you $&@&$&@ loser!" They lean on the "laws of the capitalist jungle" to justify their human relations. If you are trying to find the middle path, then you're golden, and you can learn as you go too.

I would try to help a buyer if possible, with whatever guidance. But it reaches a point where someone is just messing with you.
 




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