Do I need a Floyd Rose?

Gas Hed

Member
Messages
1,191
I'm a hard tail player true and true. But lately I've been GASing for a wammy bar guitar to cover some tunes that use it. Question is what is the best type of trem? I'm fascinated by a Floyd Rose because I'm a child of the 80s. But does it matter what type you get?
 

Bankston

Member
Messages
16,283
It matters to me. No other trem has the tuning stability of a German-built OFR that is properly set up.
 

RCM78

Member
Messages
6,031
What Bankston says is true. Nothing will stay in tune better then an original Floyd. I've had Floyd equipped guitars since the mid 80's and currently have four.

With that said I'm consistently impressed with the tuning stability of the Wilkinson vs100 on my Warmoth. I'd imagine the Gotoh 510 Suhr uses is even better...
 

shane8

Member
Messages
31,613
pros - will stay in tune as well as anything

cons - setting up & string changes

there's a lot of options in trems that may include locking tuners, roller nuts & bridges which may be less hassle if you don't wanna do extreme trem abuse ;)
 

Pat Healy

Senior Member
Messages
10,952
Yes, for certain songs with heavy whammy bar usage, nothing can beat a Floyd. Gotohs in particular are great. I have several vintage trem guitars, several Floyd guitars, and the Floyds are absolutely superior in terms of tuning stability. Don't be swayed by the vintage trem guys who say that they can set up their vintage trems to be as stable under heavy use as a Floyd. It's not possible. Also don't be swayed by the "Floyds sound bad" crowd. They are full of crap. Get a Floyd.
 

Guitarwiz007

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,157
I agree with the really heavy whammy usage ala Vai, VH, Satriani and that ilk you're best off with a Floyd style. That being said though, I use whammy constantly although not to the degree of those mentioned and my Suhr and G&L's do just fine. They all have immaculate cut nuts and locking tuning machines. And though the Suhr is my No. 1, the G&L trem is still the smoothest I've ever used.

I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous.
 

Gas Hed

Member
Messages
1,191
pros - will stay in tune as well as anything

cons - setting up & string changes

there's a lot of options in trems that may include locking tuners, roller nuts & bridges which may be less hassle if you don't wanna do extreme trem abuse ;)
So how much set-up work should I expect? I'm ok with an every so often truss bar adjustment. String changes - no way around the time investment on that one, so I get that.
 

GCDEF

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
28,253
So how much set-up work should I expect? I'm ok with an every so often truss bar adjustment. String changes - no way around the time investment on that one, so I get that.
They're not as bad as some people would have you believe. String changes aren't much different. You have to remove the nut clamps, cut the ball end off the string and use an allen wrench to lock the string in the bridge, but that adds maybe 20 seconds per string. Intonation is more difficult, but you don't need to do that often. Getting the thing in tune can take a while, but once you're there, you're there all night.
 

tonydetiger

Member
Messages
1,882
So how much set-up work should I expect? I'm ok with an every so often truss bar adjustment. String changes - no way around the time investment on that one, so I get that.
String changes can actually be quick if you change up the method. On my Floyd, I change one string at a time, and I stuck with the same string gauge. That way I'm not spending time setting it up all over again.

Also when you string it, run the string through so the ball end is at the headstock tuners. Trim the other end of the string at about 1/2" past the fine tuners on the Floyd, clamp in the string,and tune up. You'll save yourself a ton of time.

The only fiddley thing with Floyds is getting them properly stretched until the tuning is stable. At least that's been my experience. Once it's there though, it's rock solid.

Beyond that, you're only tough choice is are you looking for dive only, or are you wanting to both raise and lower pitch. Most dive only trems are made with the trem flat against the body. Those that are able to raise/lower pitch have a cutout under the tremplate.
 

Dr Doom

Member
Messages
1,108
Tuning one up takes some getting used to. You don't tune it like you would a regular guitar
 

handtrix

Member
Messages
2,359
I'm a hard tail player true and true. But lately I've been GASing for a wammy bar guitar to cover some tunes that use it. Question is what is the best type of trem? I'm fascinated by a Floyd Rose because I'm a child of the 80s. But does it matter what type you get?
It's a tool. Get it ! You will play it different. It will play you different.
It will, though change your picking hand to pick slightly forward changing the Tone, attack, and tightness. More boing, less snap.


Kahlers are a poor design by comparison and the Gotoh 1996 is far better built than today's German OFRs.
Go with the Gotoh.
yes, and is closely based off the Ibanez EDGE.
 

bloomz

Senior Member
Messages
4,228
Yes, for certain songs with heavy whammy bar usage, nothing can beat a Floyd. Gotohs in particular are great. I have several vintage trem guitars, several Floyd guitars, and the Floyds are absolutely superior in terms of tuning stability. Don't be swayed by the vintage trem guys who say that they can set up their vintage trems to be as stable under heavy use as a Floyd. It's not possible. Also don't be swayed by the "Floyds sound bad" crowd. They are full of crap. Get a Floyd.
Word.

Did you know Fender trems are Mattell products?
 

Spikerama

Member
Messages
26
If you are changing your regular gigging guitar to a Floyd, you may experience a big change in tone.

I simply swapped Floyds on my guitar and had to swap back because of the tone change.

But...maybe not, or maybe for the better! Good luck!
 

Dexter.Sinister

Still breathing
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
7,127
I don't care for the "sound" of the FR trem, but boyoboy can it be fun to play. I have one guitar with an OFR and that is plenty for me (I have owned at least 20 OFR equipped guitars from the 80s to present and gigged them thousands of outings, fer reference). I have 2 and 6 point strat trems and a new to me Glendale chimemaster bridge (a hybrid between a three piece tele bridge and a strat bridge) and thing they sound nicer, sustain longer, and feel better to my picking paw. OTOH, nothing does the super wide pitch shifts that a OFR does, IME.

I'm glad to have one (one).
 
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