Do I Need A P Bass?

Discussion in 'Bass Area; The Bottom Line' started by Neenja, Apr 20, 2018.

  1. darkbluemurder

    darkbluemurder Member

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    To those who are afraid of big necks (me too), consider a P-Bass body with a J-Bass neck. My partscaster P-Bass is like this.
     
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  2. No_Stairway

    No_Stairway Supporting Member

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    I played bass for years and have always preferred the fatter Pbass style necks (though Imprefer a thinner guitar neck).

    Nah just get a MM Stingray, very similar neck profiles (a little chunkier if I recall) but if given a choice ai'd go Stingray over Pbass. I'm still going to buy a Stingray one day, even though I've put down the bass for guitar this last year, I've always wanted one, just never got around to it.

    Actually I think they solved that problem with their 2018 Parallel series the Pj Bass is set for Dec release. Looks like a Pbass body with a jazz neck and pickups borrowed from both models.

    https://www.guitarcenter.com/Fender...-Bass-with-Maple-Fingerboard-Electric-Bass.gc
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2018
  3. Jon Moody

    Jon Moody Member

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    Short answer: No, you don't need a P Bass if you're perfectly happy with a J.

    Long answer: I own a couple of both, and they both have their pros/cons. For me, I prefer the sound/tonality of the P Bass as it sits lower in the mix and is more supportive. The J to me has a more forward, mid-focused "nose" about it that sits a bit higher. In terms of the neck specs, I started playing on a string bass so as long as the neck isn't thin (usually like Ibanez or Lakland), I don't have any issue with it.
     
  4. henryjurstin13

    henryjurstin13 Member

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    I have a Lakland Decade for my "P bass"
     
  5. Floyd Eye

    Floyd Eye Member

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    I can get P and J tones out of my Spector NS4. And so much more. And the neck is so much nicer than any Fender I've ever played.
     
  6. bigtone23

    bigtone23 Member

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    This is pretty much my take. No one really needs a P, unless they want that classic, iconic split coil tone. A soloed neck PU on a Jazz gets pretty close, but no cigar.
    If it's a neck thing, there are plenty of jazz necked Ps out there. The 1 5/8 to 1 3/4" wide nut of a P is not what makes the tone. The P/J bass can get a good P tone, but I have to play one that does the J thing as well. A good choice for 'close enough for RnR!'
     
  7. eldorado2001

    eldorado2001 Member

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    Yes. In addition to the reasons already posted, 2 knobs = The Simple Life.
     
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  8. Somnium Guitars

    Somnium Guitars Member

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    I would say find a Fender MIJ PJ....great build and sounds...everybody needs at least 1 p-bass....or 2 or maybe 3...hmmm
     
  9. Castlebreath

    Castlebreath Member

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  10. Leep Dog

    Leep Dog Member

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    Yes, yes you do.
     
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  11. hillbillypolack

    hillbillypolack Member

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    That’s a good explanation actually.

    I prefer a P Bass for that heavy botttom end, though I do want to add a J at some point. Seems most who play a lot say they each have advantages!
     
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  12. eigentone

    eigentone Silver Supporting Member

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    They absolutely do. I have a Precision Bass, a 4003, and a Jazz Bass. I just aim to use the bass that fits the song best. Acoustically and pickup-wise, they are each different.

    Precision = Punchy (Volume+Fast Decay) and strong Low-Mids. Works well in just about every situation/genre. Very versatile, yet simple.
    4003 = Much sustain. Clear lows and mids. Can Zing too. Neck pickup is deep. Bridge pickup is the classic Ric bass tone. Distinct tone.
    Jazz = Clear upper mids high end, lots of dynamic range, lower output pickups (traditionally). Neck pickup is warm and deep. Bridge pickup is "Burpy". Together, they work great for popping and slapping. Sounds quite natural, but can get lost in a busy mix pretty quickly.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2018
  13. Bassomatic

    Bassomatic Member

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    I've gone almost 40 years without needing one, although I did briefly own a P Lyte as well as a Highway one. Then again I have an ancient P/J that's seen tons of gigs and recording, but it has a vintage J neck.
     
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  14. soulman969

    soulman969 Member

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    I believe every bassist should have a PBass or one very similar in type. As simple as they may seem they are the voice of so much recorded music and cut through a mix as well or better than any bass made.
     
  15. mcknigs

    mcknigs Supporting Member

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    Get a P-Bass. Play with it a bunch. Discover what it's all about. Don't keep it if you don't like it, but every bassist should know the P-bass experience.
     
  16. Jignant

    Jignant Member

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    I have been gigging a MIM Fender Classic 50s P Bass for about three years now. Gig rig is a V3 Fender Rumble 500 head and 4x10 cab. As a long time guitar player that is playing bass in my current lineup, I could not be happier with this bass. Playability is great and I don't know how much it could benefit from a pickup swap because I have no complaints about it's tone, fit or finish. To be fair, I am still learning what I like about bass guitars and amp rigs...Right now I am jonesing for a Jetglo Rick 4003, but I squarely fall into the camp of YES you should have a P Bass. The rig in action:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Oh and I forgot to mention, the entire rig cost me less than $1,400.00...
     
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  17. Floyd Eye

    Floyd Eye Member

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    Roughly half the price of one of my main basses and about $800 less than the insured value of my other main bass. And there isn’t even a point in comparing any of my bass rigs with a Fender Rumble.
    It’s not that I necessarily think price equates with quality ( though it no doubt does to some degree), but it may highlight the difference in gear choices between long time guitar players who switch to bass and guys who are long time bass players.

    As to the premise of the thread, there are in fact plenty of basses that out p bass Fender P basses. That said, a P bass is an iconic instrument and it is a long time standard for good reason. They sound remarkably consistent from instrument to instrument and they sound good.

    If someone were to ask me what a good starting point for anyone just getting into bass would be I would most likely suggest the exact rig you have. There’s not a damn thing wrong with it brother. It’s just not my preference. And I paid a high price to get my preference in terms of not only cash, but weight and inconvenience.
     
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  18. Jignant

    Jignant Member

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    There is no doubt in my mind that there are better rigs out there...probably better P Basses in the American made or vintage realm. Knowing that I have not had the time invested in bass playing as I have with guitar, my taste in gear should evolve just as it did with guitar setups, preferences and what works for me. I started with my Dads old Ampeg flip top and a Fender Dimension bass. The fliptop does not have the power for a live setup and is relegated to my music room these days. The Rumble has the built in DI, the amp is light weight and with the P Bass, it's a simple rig to use. It is a more entry level setup for sure!
    I am dying to get my hands on a Rick to see if they work for me (I can't seem to find one locally to get my hands around) And I would love to know what offerings there are in a higher end bass amp setup. TGP approved of course!!!:cool:

    To the OP, I wish you luck in your search if a P Bass is the route you choose to go!
     
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  19. zeffbeff

    zeffbeff Member

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    I'm a guitarist who needed a bass for recording purposes. I went all-in and bought an American Standard Jazz Bass a few years ago. It's utterly phenomenal and I love it so much that now I consider myself as much of a bassist as a guitarist.

    I've played my friend's Squier P-Bass at several rehearsals, and yes, it's a wildly different class (low end Squier vs high end Fender). But overall, in a band situation, I found the P-Bass too boomy for my playing style. I can see how others would like it, though.

    But I prefer how the Jazz bass can really just blend in a mix perfectly, and I love the growl with a bit of overdrive. I also prefer the offset body.

    So, you might not actually NEED a P-Bass.. or maybe you do!
     
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  20. Theorist

    Theorist Supporting Member

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    Yes, you definitely need one, I personally like the fat neck much better than the JB. You can test the waters with a Squier VM P bass, I got one and don’t see any point where it falls short, a P Bass is like a Tele, a simple instrument that is hard to get wrong...
     
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