Do most Fender amps have huge jumps in volume between "1" and "2"?

still.ill

Member
Messages
3,195
Bought a '68 Custom Princeton Reverb that exhibits this problem... do the Deluxe Reverbs also have this issue? I've heard firsthand that the new Bassbreaker series actually avoid this
 
Last edited:

Stratonator

Member
Messages
2,959
It's the taper of the volume dial that Fender uses in some amps.

While the problem is annoying, the solution is quite simple and cheap. Replace it with one with an audio taper pot instead. Part should cost about $5-$10.

MAKE SURE you are using the same value that is currently in your amp.

Other Fender amps like the Blues or HotRod Deluxe/DeVille originals and reissues have this issue as well.
 

e???

Member
Messages
2,932
yeah my 68" Custom Deluxe Reverb has that issue. A lot of amps do, big jump early on. Not so hard to dial it in in though, you'll get used to it and it just takes seconds when you are
 

dwoverdrive

Member
Messages
3,606
Very common. I just work around it knowing the amp was meant to be turned up a little anyway. Can be a PITA though
 

ripgtr

Member
Messages
8,664
Actually, they may have done that on purpose.
"Hey, it's that loud on 2, how loud will it be on 10?"
Yea, most of the volume is done by 3, after that, it just adds overdrive.
 

BMX

Supporting Member
Messages
3,381
Like others have said, Fender amps have almost all of their volume by about 3ish on the dial and then don't really add much. I've heard a lot of guys say things like "I only had my amp on 3 and I was getting complaints from the sound guy" when in reality they had much/most of the volume of the amp.
 

Lewguitar

Member
Messages
5,667
It's not true of vintage Fenders.

My blackface Fenders from the 60's, including two blackface Deluxe Reverbs, all get louder and louder up to at least volume 6.

Might be the speakers I use: Celestion.

Maybe the cheaper speakers get saturated at lower volumes and then crash.

My Celestions are more efficient and stay cleaner...contrary to what some might think about Celestions being more distorted.
 

zenas

Member
Messages
8,114
If you can dial in a volume that works for without too much trouble just leave it alone.
 

teleking36

Supporting Member
Messages
3,892
I could probably take the knob off of my vintage Princeton Reverb after setting it at 3.5. I have very rarely run the volume anywhere but this spot in the 7 years I've owned it.
 

ripgtr

Member
Messages
8,664
It's not true of vintage Fenders.
I currently have a SFDR and a BF pro reverb. The pro is like 2 feet from me right now. Had it on yesterday and will again today.
Both do get a Little louder past 3, but not a lot. By far, the majority of the volume is maxed out by 3 or 4. They Do start to compress after that, so the max just overdrives, and quieter sounds DO get louder, but the over all doesn't really get a lot louder. WAY more volume between 0 -2 than between 2 -10.
I have used various speakers in both.
 

great-case.com

a.k.a. "Mitch"
Messages
5,748
No, not my Blues Junior (circa '82), but I must ask... as my very generous wife often does: "Why settle for less than two?"
 

dewey decibel

Member
Messages
10,290
The Hot Rod series do this for sure, didn't think the RIs did but I could be wrong. As said, swapping the pot solves the issue.
 

jamester

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,404
Most vintage ones I've had don't even make sound until almost 2.
My vintage BF Bassman starts getting loud at 1 1/2, and it's blasting by 3. Any sound I can muster out of less than 1 1/2 is weak and thin. Almost the worst of both worlds; can't use it for quiet practice, and can't crank it up live to drive the power tubes because it gets too loud too quickly.
 

misa

Supporting Member
Messages
3,576
Can't say I'm well experienced with the modern Fenders, but a Pro Junior I once had seemed to go from nothing to band volume within a tiny fraction of a turn.
 
Last edited:




Top