Do people work on old solid state Peaveys?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by Cuthbert, May 26, 2015.

  1. Cuthbert

    Cuthbert Member

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    Excuse my ignorance but I haven't owned a transistor amp in 35 years. I just got an old 80's Bandit but the low gain input and vol. control doesn't work. The high gain channel works fine. Does this sound like a tough repair? Do people even work on those old beasts nowadays?
     
  2. Silent Sound

    Silent Sound Member

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    Yeah, those old Bandit's are fairly easy circuits. Any guitar tech that can't fix one isn't a real tech. The question is, is it worth the cost? They're not hard to find are particularly expensive amps to begin with.
     
  3. Kyle B

    Kyle B Supporting Member

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    The low-gain input sux anyhow.

    Volume control is easily replaced by any monkey with a soldering gun and basic skills. Part is like $5 direct from Peavey.
     
  4. J M Fahey

    J M Fahey Member

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    Yes they can be fixed by a competent Tech, probably even by somebody who repairs TVs, Home Theater, DVD players, etc. , provided you get and give him the schematic (easy to get and worst case can be ordered free from Peavey).

    As of: "you can get a similar one for peanuts" , I take that with a grain of salt.
    If you live in a large city with dozens of Music Shops or at least a couple GC you can visit a couple, search for one,which you will test personally (I don't trust used stuff vendors, any kind), buy and drive home.
    Cool.
    If not, you'll have to buy online, trust, pay and have it delivered.
    Being 30+ years old, maybe abused stuff, who guarantees it's as new?
    Unless the typical EBay catchphrase "I am my own guarantee, just look at my qualifications" means something to you.

    At that age, *at least* it will have scratchy pots and dirty/worn jacks and switches .

    Personally, if the amp works well, shows no abuse, and only has jack and pot trouble (what an EBay one will very probably have too) , I'd rather trust a local Tech who will probably not charge much (say, maybe 1/2 hour bench time plus parts?), and be there , face to face (not an anonymous EBay or Craigslist seller) .

    Personally I much prefer an 80's USA made Peavey Bandit to ANY Korean/Chinese/Vietnamese junk which is the other option at that price level.
    Maintenance? ... everything needs maintenance.
    Quite justified in an amp which will probably work for another 30 years if asked so.

    Of course, it's your choice :)
     
  5. snow and steel

    snow and steel Supporting Member

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    I've fixed them before - and I'm far form a master tech, so yes - any tech should be able if he is a real amp tech. Take it in and get an estimate, and go from there.
     
  6. Steve Hotra

    Steve Hotra Silver Supporting Member

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    I think people still do. My pedal steel guitar teacher found a Peavey ( not sure what model) but he got it up and running. His Emmons sounds great through it.
     
  7. Jamar

    Jamar Supporting Member

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    i didn't realize those old Peavey's could actually break.
     
    Help!I'maRock! likes this.
  8. J M Fahey

    J M Fahey Member

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    And you are right, it's not actually "broken" , just a pot dirty enough (after 35 years! ) to having lost contact (or maybe the dirty/clean switch also dirty/worn) and a weak/bent jack .
    Amazing.

    I know many famous names (which I won't mention) with scratchy pots after just 1 year :tapedshut
     

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