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Do those spliced neck guitars bug you?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by scottlr, Feb 15, 2009.

  1. scottlr

    scottlr Member

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    The first time I picked up an Epi version of a Gibson at a store and saw the neck was spliced up by the nut, it really put me off. Awhile back, I had a really nice playing Emperor Regent in natural. That damn spliced neck just stuck in my craw! I ended up selling mostly because of that! Had it been a sunburst, I'd have never seen that under the black neck, and it would have never bothered me.

    Is it Taylor that has some sort of tongue and groove at the headstock? That bugs me, too. It just seems cheap to me. Does this bother anyone else?
     
  2. aleclee

    aleclee TGP Tech Wrangler Staff Member

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  3. scottlr

    scottlr Member

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  4. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    Watch Juha Ruokangas's Video Diary. He goes into why a neck splice is (or can be) a good thing. Les Pauls don't have them, and that's where Les Pauls break just due to the nature of the grain in the wood. Violins have spliced necks too, have had forever.
     
  5. scottlr

    scottlr Member

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    Yea, I know. It's just a visual thing that I have a hard time dismissing. FWIW, I have owned many Gibsons and never broke any of them, so far. (knock on tonewood!)
     
  6. dk123123dk

    dk123123dk Member

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    I have a Schecter that has a similar style construction. From what I understand this helps prevent the headstock from breaking off if you drop or bump the guitar. The Schecter I have also has a volute to add a bit more wood at the scarf joint. It took a bit of getting used to, but now it just feels right against my hand when playing open position chords.

    dk
     
  7. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

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    Doesn't bother me any more than say a skunk stripe on the neck of a strat. Just part of the build process, no biggie.
     
  8. gkoelling

    gkoelling Member

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    I've always associated a scarf joint with a lower end guitar. I don't know why but I have. It is stronger, though.
     
  9. scottlr

    scottlr Member

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    I know it is done to reduce the amount of wood needed to carve a neck with a headstock angle, like a Gibson. It makes perfect sense, too. I wonder why they didn't do that way back when they started making them to conserve the wood costs/scrap.
     
  10. dougk

    dougk Silver Supporting Member

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    Makes it stronger at the thin end of the neck by keeping the grain running correctly. No, it doesn't bother me in the least. Tongue and Groove on my baby taylor is funky but I'm to busy playing my guitars to care.

    -btw I scarf joint all my angled headstocks.
     
  11. rickenbackerkid

    rickenbackerkid Member

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    Seeing it's stronger, and therefore better it should really be associated with a higher end guitar!
     
  12. SGNick

    SGNick Member

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    It's documented, Les Paul suggested a multipiece neck for stability, Gibson went for the one piece neck to save on cost/time.
     
  13. PFCG

    PFCG Member

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    I was always hesitant about how taylor does their headstocks, however, ive learned that they are so tight, you can string it up without even gluing the joint and it will stay in tune just as well!

    I have a scarf joint on my Alembic, but its hidden by decorative veneer layers. Its quite strong.
     
  14. mad dog

    mad dog Silver Supporting Member

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    Doesn't bother me at all.
     
  15. Cymbaline

    Cymbaline Member

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    Why should a superior construction method bother anybody?
     
  16. musicofanatic5

    musicofanatic5 Supporting Member

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    Whaaaaaa!?!??! A one-piece neck gibson-style results in much more waste. Especially with a 17 degree headstock pitch. Lotta scrap mahogany on the floor of the neck dept at gibson.
    I dislike the scarf joint esthetically, and have seen many cheap gtrs where this delaminates. The finish must protect this joint from moisture absorption. Almost all trad built classical gtrs use headstock scarf joint.
     
  17. AS193

    AS193 Member

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    He didn't say anything about waste, just cost/time.
     
  18. teefus

    teefus Silver Supporting Member

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    i always think "cheapo" when i see it. seems like a lot of deans and lower end acoustics do it. i saw a mid-line acoustic with a scarf joint at the neck and thought that was ridiculous.
     
  19. dougk

    dougk Silver Supporting Member

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    Because this IS The Gear Page?

    Got me. It proved itself to me, the bird I built has a scarfed headstock. It went down and cracked but didn't come apart and repaired easily. Been holding with 10.5-50's ever since. Personally, if done right I kind of like the look of them.
     
  20. SGNick

    SGNick Member

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    Exactly, at the time, it was cheaper for them to mill ones piece into a neck than to glue several pieces together, let the glue dry, then make the neck.
     

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