Do you bother humidifying your electric guitars during the winter months?

Gms

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
689
No, never have. I had guitars in the house for decades before I heard about humidifying guitars and never had a problem, so just continued doing nothing.
 

samdjr74

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,145
The room in which I keep all of my guitars except for a couple is humidified. I had some problems in the past when they weren't. Necks got really bad, binding started to break around fret ends, etc.
 

PartyPlatter

Member
Messages
23
Anything over $3k or any acoustic gets a humidipak in the case when I'm not playing it. I'm OCD about the relief measurement so I'd rather not fool with them on the more expensive guitars.....or any vintage style Fender neck, PITA.

With humidity here varying between 20% and 50% on any given day, I've seen my relief go from .002 on up to .017 lately. That's with a digital tool. My life was a lot easier before I bought that freakin tool.
What tool is this you speak of? I'm fairly particular about relief and my feeler gauges have seen better days.
 

Wms76

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
385
Yes, humidifier covers 2 of 3 floors of HVAC and keeps it in a good range year round.

… infrequently have to adjust truss rods, it’s nice. :cool:
 

jjaaam

Member
Messages
1,303
For the last few years I’ve been keeping all of my electric guitars in their cases and putting damp sponges in there during the winter months while my electric baseboard heaters are running.

It’s a bit of a pain in the butt since I have nine electrics and two acoustic guitars.

I’m wondering if you guys feel that that’s overkill. I’m all in for fussing with my acoustic guitars but doing it for the electrics might not be necessary.

I know that for decades I never humidified anything and luckily nothing bad seemed to happen.

Does anybody care to jump in and add their two cents on this topic?
Yes for my Taylor acoustic. It’s only a 210e, but it’s still worth taking care of lol.

I’ve never in my 41 years of playing worried about using a humidifier in my electrics.
 

rawkguitarist

Member
Messages
11,542
Yes I do... but I just took this pic of my hygrometer. I've procrastinated setting up my humidifier and will do it today. I have a one off custom semi-hollow (335'sh) and a full hollow body with a thin very old sitka spruce top. I defiantly want these humidified. Regarding "fret sprout" I corrected that on two of my guitars last year.

My office is about 200 sqft. I close the vent to reduce heat that comes into the room throughout the night, using a small space heater in the day time. And keep my door closed with the humidifier. I can keep humidity about 45 - 50%.

IMG_3578.JPG
 

Bach88s

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
722
Anything made of wood loves to be moist and temp controlled to a point. Dry wood cracks and moist wood heaves or swells. Coming from piano and classical guitar, I love keeping things properly humidified. Stuff sounds good and necks and actions remain stable. Talking to Bill Colling's years ago he said the guitar in a quality case is in it's own happy little ecosystem and can be easily maintained. So if you don't want to maintain a bigger area you can use a case too. I do both actually. Some of my guitars I monitor the temp and humidity via blue tooth with little sensors. I can look right on my phone to where things are staying and watch graphs of how things move. I am OCD and it makes me happy :) I use Sensor Push units and the humidity packs that add or pull moisture for my cased guitars. Don't forget temperature as well. It is often overlooked. Super hot or super cold is bad Joo Joo. As well as extreme temperature swings.
 

rawkguitarist

Member
Messages
11,542
Never heard of this until now, nah I’ll pass.
Well... there are some goofy beliefs and concepts touted here. But this is not one of them.

It depends on the climate you live in and what types of guitars you have. Solid bodies, about the worst thing is fret sprout. But that doesn't mean there aren't other issues.

But cracked guitars from drying out are VERY REAL. Maybe give it a quick google.
 

cram

Member
Messages
14,117
The main room I keep - yes.
If I can keep it going; refilling etc, I can keep the acousitc, semi-holows out full time.
If I'm away for the weekend or whatever, they go in their cases for that.
- I'm literally putting the ones with sound holes away as I prep for a trip right now.

I'm more liberal with my strat.
I'm less liberal with guitars that have binding on the fretboard.
Very sensitive to heat sources; keeping them away from baseboard/vents/sunlight in a room.

One of my old guitars was kept in a room that featured forced hot air which is awful for humidity levels and I was always having to set it up in spring/fall seasons here in the northeast.

Keep yer wood wet!
 

Raimond

Member
Messages
6,584
Well... there are some goofy beliefs and concepts touted here. But this is not one of them.

It depends on the climate you live in and what types of guitars you have. Solid bodies, about the worst thing is fret sprout. But that doesn't mean there aren't other issues.

But cracked guitars from drying out are VERY REAL. Maybe give it a quick google.
I’m going for that reliced look! Good to know.
 

eigentone

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
8,979
Yes. I live in New England and the winters can go from humid to very dry. I have had electrics get fret sprout and the setup/tuning changes with the humidity. Things are much more consistent when humidity is regulated and I don't want to bother tweaking the setup when I grab a guitar, storing them in cases. But the acoustics, they need it more than my electrics.
 

ggwwbb

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,014
I used to run a humidifier in my guitar room (all electrics) to combat fret sprout in the winter, but then I filed all of my guitars that had fret sprout and haven't needed to since. This winter is especially dry in our area, so I should probably run one in there a few times a week, but I probably won't.....
 

Catatafish

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
745
What tool is this you speak of? I'm fairly particular about relief and my feeler gauges have seen better days.

 
Messages
3,856
I have electric guitars. acoustic guitars, a mandolin and a violin. I have too many instruments to deal with "in case" humidifiers, so I run a room humidifier in my living room (where the instruments are) during the winter. I try to keep the humidity between 40% in the winter and 60% in the summer. It's more comfortable for me, as well.

Not humidifying your instruments can lead to "fret sprout" (or fretboard binding cracks on Gibson guitars), as well as excessive neck relief and other issues. Acoustic guitars can develop serious cracks and suffer from low action and buzzing as a result of shrinkage of the spruce tops. My violin pegs will shrink enough to slip and fall out of tune at the first sign of a drop in humidity.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
36,558
Never have.
I adjust relief or knock back any fret sprout.
No further damage.
Is finish checking a temp problem or a time problem?
Would finishes prone to checking not shrink over time in spite of humidity balance?
 

120db

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
235
Yes. I run two humidifiers, a whole house one and also a tabletop one in the music room.
 




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