Do you enjoy managing people?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Travst, Jul 8, 2019.

Do you enjoy managing people?

  1. Yes

    39 vote(s)
    23.8%
  2. No

    125 vote(s)
    76.2%
  1. GuiltySpark

    GuiltySpark Member

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    Yes, truly one of the most difficult meetings I had was laying someone off. At our company, HR does it 100%. We aren't allowed to say anything, but have to be present in the meeting. It's such a weird vibe in the room. It's read from a prepared script by the HR leader, and they get some time to clear out before being walked out. I was the manager, so I sat there watching this guy melt, wondering why him.

    FWIW, I didn't get any input into the choice either. Thursday at 4pm I was told we were doing it next day at 8:30am. Just like that.
     
  2. Ramboorider

    Ramboorider Member

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    I was a project manager for a number of years. I was never a manager in that nobody reported directly to me for discipline, raises, reviews, etc, but I was one of a couple project managers and everyone else worked under us on projects except for the division manager, who I reported to. I mostly liked it, but it was so dependent on the people. Some folks you knew you could trust to do the work and come to you when needed, but not come to you with every little thing - self directed folks basically. I loved working with them, they were more like colleagues than underlings. Other folks were such a pain in the ass, though. You'd work with them, you'd hold their hand, and you KNEW at the end of the day you were gonna have to do their work yourself before it was ready to be seen by the client. I hated that. I'd work with them. I got pulled in by the division manager to help him with their performance reviews and any discipline issues - I'd do what I could to help them grow into the job. But the people who were gonna grow into the job didn't really need that much help - you just had to start them with relatively easy stuff and then increase the difficulty gradually and they'd grow into it naturally. The people you had to babysit all the time very VERY rarely ever got there. I could think of one guy who was a lot of trouble early who eventually came into his own and got really good at the job at a higher level. Everyone else who was a lot of work early, well, it was basically wasted work. They just weren't a good fit and generally left to find a more appropriate line of work on their own.

    I was asked a number of times to go after some management positions and I just didn't want to do it. I liked DOING the work, working with my teams to get a good product out, but I didn't want to just OVERSEE the work and the people and rarely if ever get my hands dirty, which is what I'd have been doing in the jobs I elected not to go after. For sure, there was a level of upper management that I probably would have liked and maybe been good at, dealing with organizational issues and policy issues, but leaving most of the day to day people managing to folks a level or two below in middle management. But there was no way I ever wanted to spend years in middle management in order to MAYBE eventually move into upper management. I barely knew any middle managers who liked their jobs. Some got reasonably good at them, but there was just no real job satisfaction at that level. I figured I enjoyed what I was doing, I made a good living, I didn't really want to move into something I enjoyed a lot less for another 10% and the hope that maybe I'd eventually get to do something at a higher level that I'd find interesting again. So I never became a manger other than a project manager. And it worked fine for me.
     
  3. Dr. Tweedbucket

    Dr. Tweedbucket Deluxe model available !!!11

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    Not unless I have to, I mean it's a big plastic hassle. If they can't manage themselves, don't drag me into it :red
     
  4. Mad Wombat

    Mad Wombat Member

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    No. I've covered for managers at work many times, and I can do it well enough, but I find it stressful.
    I prefer to quietly do my own thing.
     
  5. Sam Xavier

    Sam Xavier Member

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    Yep, it's great!

    Oh, hold on... I thought you said mangling. Silly me.
     
    Travst likes this.
  6. Dickey

    Dickey Member

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    I don't care for people in general, so...NO.
    I work by myself at my job & couldn't be happier.
     
    Eric Rowland likes this.
  7. BlueRiff

    BlueRiff Member

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    Yeah I’ve been let go twice - once totally blind sided after being told by my manager I did great in the stack ranking presentations (they didn’t call it that but we knew what was happening). The afternoon before he was saying I did awesome, joking with me, etc. Next morning it was “meet me at the hotel and bring your laptop” call at 6:30a. The next time I saw it coming and thought I was being given a chance to turn it around. Then two weeks later a meeting pops on the calendar with someone from HR. A long backstory on that one but that’s another day. Never a fun time diving back into the job market but you learn a lot each time. Things are clicking now though thank God.
     
    GuiltySpark likes this.
  8. metropolis_4

    metropolis_4 Member

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    In general, yes, I enjoy it.

    It can be frustrating, annoying, depressing, heartbreaking, gut wrenching, and downright scary. But it can also be very rewarding.
     
  9. BlueRiff

    BlueRiff Member

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    Always use the sandwich feedback technique - (1) Tell them what they’re doing right, (2) Address the area of develop/concern and you need. (3) Finalize with positive outlook going forward “I know you have skills to do this - looking forward to seeing that and your impact on this team”. Many will say it’s “sugar coating” but it’s not if sincere and candid and can be effective. If your going to manage/lead people, you must strive to learn the art of dealing with people and relationships. Lots of folks with technical backgrounds get into management and are totally miserable because they never put the time into studying getting the best out of people and understanding their motivations and think their technical prowess is enough. Then they run into people problems and have trouble making the reads on how to handle it. I’ve seen this so many times.
     
    Travst likes this.
  10. T92780

    T92780 Silver Supporting Member

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    Most I ever managed was about 100-employees. I did enjoy at that time of my life. I simply took the best and left the worse behind of prior top mentors. I led by example, team player who got in trenches with staff, got their respect, but also allow them to have fun "at the right times" and I knew how to real them in. I was big on letting people go home early on slow days if they wanted, etc. We had fun and did great things...as a team. I was like a great Father, though many were older them me. I'd like to think I changed/sculpted a few lives. Anyone have a tissue.?.
     
  11. jrjones

    jrjones Supporting Member

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    I love seeing people grow. I like being able to point people in the right direction then give them space to see where they can go. I really love what I do and am surrounded by great people.
     
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  12. Grun

    Grun Member

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    The thing about managing at least in the corporate world is that as a manager, all you are is a facilitator of policies, goals, etc. over most of which you have no control and might even disagree with. So that kind sucks most of the satisfaction out of it. Plus you have people who know you are basically powerless against any shenanigans in which they might care to engage and they play that.
    There are good people, but the rest is too much for me. Way happier in a technical lead role where I get to impart all the good stuff while the boss has to endure the cr*p. That is I mentor and guide, but no one reports directly to me.
    I imagine if I had my own business or with greater autonomy, it might be better.
     
  13. Sunshower

    Sunshower Member

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    Jul 15, 2019
    I have no desire to manage anyone unless what they're doing is affecting or involving me in some way. Otherwise I like to just leave people alone. I don't give my opinion unless asked, even when I know I'm right.
     
  14. Boston617

    Boston617 Member

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    It's funny I came across this thread.

    I've been thrown into a situation at work where I've been the "acting manager" since the beginning of June.
    Long story short, my manager had to take medical leave to get his stuff together & we still don't know if he's coming back.
    Legally, they have to hold his position for 12 weeks from the day he took leave before they can officially promote me if he doesn't end up coming back.
    So basically, since June 1st, I've been doing all the managerial crap without the managerial pay.
    Although I did get a nice raise when I got bumped to assistant & have been putting in a ton of OT to cover the short-handedness, so I can't complain too much I suppose.

    Anyway, back to the question at hand.
    As acting manager, I had to discipline one of my co-workers last week which led to him getting terminated from the higher ups.
    Hated doing that since I liked the guy I had to break the news to & I'd probably still hate it even if I didn't care for the person in question. You're still altering someone's life by taking away their income at a moment's notice.

    That being said, there are some things I do enjoy.
    I've got a self diagnosed case of OCD, so the minute I found out I was in charge, I started getting things in order quickly & read the co-workers the riot act: Help me out here & you all in turn help the store.
    Results are already happening.
    June was a transition month.
    This month, we're on pace to have our 2nd busiest month on record.
    Might have a chance at breaking the record if 2 or 3 really good days happen between now & the 31st.
    It's nice when you can go to the shelf & not have to tear out the hair on your head in order to find things.
     
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  15. GuiltySpark

    GuiltySpark Member

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    I had a situation similar, but my outcome was not nice.

    I was acting manager for several months after my boss was promoted. He recommended me as acting, and advised them to hire me into it. During that time, things got handled well, all the other managers at the site were impressed, including the site GM. I do the formal interviews with them and ace it. I have an final with HQ (dotted line relationships), and nail all but one. The GM tells me I'm basically in. Going into the final interview, I knew the guy didn't like me and I faltered on a single scenario question (which applied to maybe 5% of the job, but it was HIS 5%). He, of course, would not vote in my favor. And one 'nay' was enough to hold the position open for two more months. I'm asked by the GM to continue to act as manager.

    Fast forward 2 months. They hire a guy, and I'm told that I will be training and transitioning the role to him, and resuming my "previous" role as one of his direct reports. Which I do. I'm pulled aside from the GM who applauds my integrity with how I've handled it all. He is clearly floored that I'm still there, and I'm told he won't forget it (hint, he does).

    Roll about 9 months forward, and my new manager (the one I've trained), is giving me a bad review for year XYZ, six months into the next year, and hammering me for tasks not completed that he didn't assign until Jan of that year (which of course aren't on my goals for the review period). I appealed it to HR (who said whatevs), and to the GM (who wouldn't meet with me). It took me 3 weeks to find a new job.

    As I'm quitting, new manager says I can't quit with 2 weeks notice. That's in no way fair to him or my coworkers, and he proceeds to demand 3 months to transition projects that are in flight. He got two weeks.
     
    cajone5, Boston617 and Travst like this.
  16. Travst

    Travst Supporting Member

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    I served as Acting for a full year before getting promoted. Our retirement is calculated on our top 3 earning years, so it forces me to work an extra year to max things out. However, I've seen others work for several years without the promotion they deserve.
     

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