Do you fix this with an EQ pedal?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by ComanchePlayer, Feb 21, 2012.

  1. ComanchePlayer

    ComanchePlayer Member

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    Okay, so there is a song I play where I arpeggiate an open Am chord by just slowly strumming down the 4th, 3rd and 2nd string. While playing this I'm usually either on the bridge or 2nd position on my Comanche. With the visual sound double trouble on.

    The problem occurs when I hit the 2nd string and it starts to ring with the first 2 strings that I already strummed. Instead of a nice ringing distortion to compliment the first 2 strings that are already ringing. I get this awful growl that comes in. I know the sound I want is in there because I can hear it underneath this other growl that really ruins the harmony of the strings and I want it gone.

    So could an EQ pedal fix this?
     
  2. rickenbackerkid

    rickenbackerkid Member

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    No, an EQ won't fix it. Have your intonation set - that might.
     
  3. ComanchePlayer

    ComanchePlayer Member

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    Thought of that too, but since it was only in the first position I didn't think it would have that big an effect on it. Of course it could be really crazy out of whack too.

    I'll check it tomorrow, thanks.
     
  4. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    It sounds like a rogue overtone...

    1. How much distortion are you using - that will exaggerate it.

    2. Sometimes even tho your guitar is intonated correctly and tuned, using a tuner, you need to actually tune the guitar to the chord you're playing. For example, if you've tweaked your tuning so an E, A and D chord (1st position) are in tune nicely, chances are your C, G, and F will be out. This can drive you insane in the studio, but after a while you get used to doing it.

    Another thing to check would be how you're playing the chord - we spent about an hour once, changing strings, tweaking intonation, re-tuning, etc. only to finally figure out that the guy playing the part was pushing really hard with one of his fingers, and knocking the note sharp.
     
  5. ComanchePlayer

    ComanchePlayer Member

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    Thats all really good info thanks.
     
  6. mthomps

    mthomps Member

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    Loudboy I like what you are saying. I find myself microtuning with my ear to the exact chord voicings I'll be playing in a recording after electronically tuning up.

    Sounds like some nasty harmonics to me too.

    Get your tuner out and fret each note of the chord individually trying to use the same finger tension you play with normally and compare the notes.

    Also play the offending notes at the same time and try to to push one of them sharp by fretting only one of the notes harder. Do this to both notes. One of them will probably get the note ringing clear. When you find the clear harmonic recreate this with the tuner plugged in. This will give you a better idea of what's really going on.

    1. Make sure you are tuned up.
    2. Check the 12th fret note. if this note is off it may be your intonation.
    3. Check the 5th and 7th fret notes. if these notes are going sharp you may have too much bow.
    4. Check the 1st and 2nd frets. If these notes go sharp your nut may be too high.


    DISCLAIMER: I keep saying "may" because I am not a guitar tech. But I have been tinkering with guitar set up lately because I'm sick of getting a set up, going home and having it all out of wack a couple of hours later due to the change of room. These are just some things I'm picking up a long the way. Hope they are of some help.
     
  7. ComanchePlayer

    ComanchePlayer Member

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    I do my own setups as well, I gotta say number 3 in your list never occured to me. Thanks.
     
  8. ComanchePlayer

    ComanchePlayer Member

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    It was intonation guys thanks. The nut may be a little high also as there is still a minor hint of it still but it's barely noticable. I'm gonna do some tinkering this weekend and see if I can get it perfect.

    Thanks for all the input, it was a big help.

    While I'm at it is there a special tuner thats used for intonation? One that is extra sensitive maybe to notes fretted at the octave?
     
  9. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    Peterson/Conn Strobo-tuner

    [​IMG]
     

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