Do you get used to the 7.25 degree radius over time

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by leftybill, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. leftybill

    leftybill Supporting Member

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    I just got home from trailing the 52 reissue tele, which was a good sounding guitar, but that radius seemed to interfere with bends beyond a half tone. I am more accustom to the modern Fenders and Gibby's radii.
    Has anyone adjusted to this radius over time?
     
  2. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

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    I have a Japanese Squier bullet that has a similar radius and neck shape.
    I think you get use to about anything over time. I have a lot of guitars with varying neck shapes and radii and anymore I don't even notice the differences much.
    But I think yeah, as far as with bends you will probably automatically adjust your technique and get accustomed to it.

    One of the things I like about Squiers is that most of the Squier necks feel and have a radius much more like the 60s Fenders than the modern Fenders, as I remember them.
     
  3. buzzp

    buzzp Member

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    I actually like bending on a 7.25 radius. Thats how everyone used to do it!
     
  4. Chris Scott

    Chris Scott Silver Supporting Member

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    I "adjust" the radius of the 7.5's I own (and client's as well) to facilitate big bends, via the actual fret - this helps considerably.

    If you mean the "feel" of the rounder rad against a flatter one, yes, it's arguably easier to play some stuff on a flatter board, but as was stated earlier, the older Fenders all came like that, that's what we played, and so I guess I'm pretty used to 'em.

    Practice makes, well...you know what I mean.
     
  5. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

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    Is it just me, or do all of the "reissues" by Fender have necks that aren't even close to what the 50s and 60s necks were like?
    I remember them as being rather slender from back to front, somewhat wide , and a 7 1/4 radius or close to it.
    All of the reissue Fenders I have seen have necks on them that feel far different than that, they look vintage in every other aspect.

    Also, although I wasn't a big fan of the old Jazzmasters and Jaguars, the radius on their necks always felt very extreme to me, and I liked them. Did you notice that as well?
     
  6. Chris Scott

    Chris Scott Silver Supporting Member

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    Likely the biggest difference that I've noticed is that, all things being equal, the older guitars had lower, well-worn frets, as well as fairly worn (or rolled, if you will) f-board edges, both of which contribute to that really comfy feel most associate with the vintage stuff.

    As far as the thickness, it does seem that some of the newer necks are a bit thicker, mos def the Allparts stuff, which is also a bit wider, but to generalize may be bit overstating. The 60's necks were almost all quite a bit more refined than the earlier (pre- rosewood) necks, this is pretty much a given.
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2012
  7. leftybill

    leftybill Supporting Member

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    I "adjust" the radius of the 7.5's I own (and client's as well) to facilitate big bends, via the actual fret - this helps considerably.
    Chris, I am not sure what you mean by "adjust" here.
     
  8. fumbler

    fumbler Member

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    Well, raising the action will solve that problem. But if you insist on low action and big bends then you really need to get a flatter board. But vintage radius is really comfy for chords IMHO. I think I'll try an 8/12 compound radius when I get the itch to do another parts-caster.

    I would guess that he means that he files a compound radius into the frets by filing down the middle more than the outside on the upper frets. You wouldn't need to take off much. This would be part of a complete level/crown job.
     
  9. Chris Scott

    Chris Scott Silver Supporting Member

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    I adjust all the frets via the hydraulic tensioner that's located at the treble end of each fret - simply turn each screw clockwise to flatten out each fret, which will reduce the "choking-out" of the notes.








    .....:omg:sarcasm:p


    ...just messin' with ya. I actually flatten out the radius of the upper frets to a +/- 9.5 radius when refretting, and in many cases while leveling/dressing the existing frets - when done correctly, it doesn't take much to eliminate the choking-out you get when bending in the middle-upper registers (where 95% of the big bending is made)

    edit: Yeah, what Fumbler said.
     
  10. leftybill

    leftybill Supporting Member

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    OK got it. Seems like a reasonable fix for a good tech.
     
  11. burningyen

    burningyen Vendor

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    I did.
     
  12. dmagalhaes

    dmagalhaes Supporting Member

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    My Classic 50's Tele is 7.25 and I got used to it quick.
     
  13. Rockledge

    Rockledge Member

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    I remember them feeling that way when they were new in the 60s, before they had any fretwear.
    Most new fender necks feel chubby and awkward to me.
     

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