Do you like relics?

Do you like relics? What kind of guitars do you prefer?

  • I like relics. I like to play Fender

  • I don't like relics. I like to play Fender

  • I like relics. I like to play Gibson

  • I don't like relics. I like to play Gibson

  • I like relics. I like to play PRS

  • I don't like relics. I like to play PRS

  • I like relics. I like to play Gretsch

  • I don't like relics. I like to play Gretsch


Results are only viewable after voting.

Mit

Member
Messages
396
I don't like artificial "relics". It's a fashion statement that's not me, if it is for others then that's fine for them.
The broken in feel is utter nonsense, that's achieved through setup and other stuff (like giving the neck a broken in feel). It's just your mind playing tricks on you because you associate it with how it looks.
 

neastguy

Member
Messages
15,220
I don't like artificial "relics". It's a fashion statement that's not me, if it is for others then that's fine for them.
The broken in feel is utter nonsense, that's achieved through setup and other stuff (like giving the neck a broken in feel). It's just your mind playing tricks on you because you associate it with how it looks.
I'm talking like fret edges and maybe deglossing a neck to make it smoother..
 
Messages
1,979
I like convincing looking relics, not overdone. I like how they look, and how they feel. I don't care that it's artificial any more than I care if the distressing on someones jeans isn't genuine.

I just don't like how much they cost.
 
Messages
6,836
I tend to stay away from relics, but I’m not saying I would NEVER buy one. I would probably never buy one new, mainly because the price premium for artificial wear isn’t worth it to me. I might buy a used relic, but even then, how much is relic and how much is genuine wear and tear..?

I guess I’d play a very mild relic at best, only because I don’t want to answer questions on whether or not the guitar is from the 50s or 60s, only to tell people its from 2009 and I’m a fraud.

Although one of my guitar heroes (Rich Robinson) had a bunch of his guitars put through the relic treatment after he lost some in the Nashville flood. I figured he’d just wear them in himself, but I guess he likes the feel of a beat up guitar.
 

stormin1155

Member
Messages
2,621
I don't have a problem with guitars that look genuinely and naturally aged, but 95% of relics look stupid because the relicing is way overdone, or done in a way that couldn't possibly have happened naturally.
 

Mit

Member
Messages
396
I'm talking like fret edges and maybe deglossing a neck to make it smoother..
Exactly, I'm talking about the same thing :)

:rotflmao Wow talk about missing the boat, pier, and lake. If someone rounds the fret edges, takes a little of the extra finish off the neck, etc, all these things you feel.

This is much more than a set up. This doesn't need to be part of the relic process though, it's really just attention to detail more than anything.
Totally, that's what I mean. Getting a broken in feel has nothing to do with relicing.
 

Pietro

2-Voice Guitar Junkie and All-Around Awesome Guy
Messages
16,440
no relics for me, and I don't play any of those guitars.
 

AZChilicat

Member
Messages
31,830
Not a relic fan at all. I get the argument that they feel "broken in", but most of the changes - rolled fingerboards, thin finishes, etc - can be done without artificial distressing. Hitting something with a chain or randomly belt sanding stuff isn't going to impart sonic mojo.

It just seems disingenuous, like pre-ripped jeans. If you want a guitar that looks like it's been played for 20 years, buy a guitar and play it for 20 years. It just feels like people paying for something they didn't earn, a quick way to look like a rock n roll hero. It's cheesy. It's hyper-expensive rock n roll cosplay.

This. A beat up guitar, or any prize possession that shows its age, tells a story. It tells my story and history with it, and if I got it second hand, it just means there was a story before my story began. Buying something that has been "reliced" is like J. Peterman buying Kramer's stories in that Seinfeld episode.
 

Structo

Member
Messages
9,558
I was against them for years.

Then I built a reliced Strat.

What is really cool about them is you are not afraid of putting a nick or dent in the finish as you would be with a brand new shiny guitar.

You can thrash it more without a care.
 

scott520

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,073
I like relics for the same reasons that I like any guitar that I buy. I like the comfort, the looks, and more importantly the tone. Like others have said, I love the idea that I can play the hell out of my MJT and not worry about dings, scratches, dents, etc... I'm completely OCD about keeping my guitars in "like-new" condition and keep them in their case when not being played. I can leave my MJT out on the stand and not panic when my beautiful little 3 year old daughter decides she wants to "play" daddy's guitar :D Lot's of reasons to love them. As for the particular brands, I love specific models from dozens of companies but in regards to the ones that produce aged/relic'd guitars....I like Fender, Gibson (some of the Tom Murphy aged guitars are flat out GORGEOUS) and Danocaster. While MJT doesn't sell complete guitars, the work that they do is top notch IMO. I LOVE my MJT strat.
 

CubanB

Member
Messages
2,148
I never even knew about relics until visiting this website. It always pops up every few weeks/months.

Do you like Les Pauls?

Do you like strats?

Do you like superstrats?

Do you like single coils?

Do you like active pickups?

Do you like floating bridge?

But usually it's just.. do you like relics? :D
 

jazzandmetal?

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,691
Not a relic fan at all. I get the argument that they feel "broken in", but most of the changes - rolled fingerboards, thin finishes, etc - can be done without artificial distressing. Hitting something with a chain or randomly belt sanding stuff isn't going to impart sonic mojo.

It just seems disingenuous, like pre-ripped jeans. If you want a guitar that looks like it's been played for 20 years, buy a guitar and play it for 20 years. It just feels like people paying for something they didn't earn, a quick way to look like a rock n roll hero. It's cheesy. It's hyper-expensive rock n roll cosplay.
I can totally see this point of view.

However, I love them. One main reason besides the look is that with a "new" looking guitar that first ding or scratch sucks.....not to mention my son loves hitting my guitar with a drum stick....or other objects. My daughter did too. They obviously don't like relics as they don't do that to her guitar. ( BTW your guitars are sick! ).
 
Messages
23,949
I need a box that says

Stop asking this question in this way.

If I see a guitar that interests me, I'll pick it up and with permission, plug it in and play it. I don't care what you wanna call it. It either looks and feels right or it doesn't.

Like Louis Armstrong's (or was it Ellington's) comment about 2 kinds of music:

There's only 2 kinds of guitars: Good ones and bad ones. Good relics and bad ones; good pristine guitars and bad ones, etc.
 




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