Do You Really Use an EQ Pedal?

I use an EQ pedal

  • All the Time

    Votes: 133 35.4%
  • Occasionally

    Votes: 140 37.2%
  • Never

    Votes: 103 27.4%

  • Total voters
    376

Gillespie1983

Member
Messages
2,664
I've seen videos on how important and essential an EQ pedal is to excellent guitar tone. I don't use one and rarely do. Not sure it's deserving of the hype. What is your opinion? Why do you use one--if you do?
 

MothAttack

Member
Messages
966
I've seen videos on how important and essential an EQ pedal is to excellent guitar tone. I don't use one and rarely do. Not sure it's deserving of the hype. What is your opinion? Why do you use one--if you do?
My opinion is it should have been one of the first pedals I purchased years ago. It's not a sexy pedal, but the right one is pretty powerful in terms of tonal shapes you can get that the rest of your rig can't.
 

John Mark Painter

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
14,280
Yes

It is extremely rarely to see a “working” player that doesn’t have one.

But they are used as modifiers for pickup selection (rolling off lows from a neck pickup), to change a sound hitting a drive (cutting lows or adding mids before drive) or often as a lead boost
 

skinvoyager

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,453
It is the single-most powerful tone-shaping tool you can own. Seriously. Guitars live in the midrange frequencies. The ability to surgically tune those frequencies means the difference between a tone you can't hear in the mix and one that sits perfectly, often by a couple dB adjustment of a single frequency. Try it once. Put one in your signal path, and play with it for one minute and tell me it's not important. And your tone changes dramatically whether the EQ is pre or post gain.
 

GAT

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
19,614
I use an MXR EQ for one thing on my board. When using the neck pickup of a dual humbucker guitar (Les Paul), I use an EQ to cut some low/low mids, add a hint of upper mids and add some high end. Really makes the neck pickup sound great, not so wooly and helps cut much better.
 

DR Mello

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
140
Occasionally, mostly as a effect or if shaping for a piece that needs it, for the most part though the EQ on my Engager boost cover that, so for me the EQ pedal used as effect.
 

Gillespie1983

Member
Messages
2,664
I have an Earthquaker Tone Job, but it doesn't see much game time. I'm thinking of the Source Audio EQ2 for live use. Are these realistic duties for an EQ pedal or are there better solutions?
a. Roll off the fizz from OD and distortion pedals.
b. remove some mud from a Neck HB pup
c. add sparkle when switching to Position 2 or 4 on a Strat.
d. in line after a Strymon Iridium to tame scoopiness, thump, fizz, etc.
 

I R P

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,424
I use a semi-parametric EQ pedal. I find that acoustic guitar and bass benefit the most from very purposeful, "surgical" EQ. For electric guitar, for me, it's more about controlling the high end and the low end, which can be done with the controls on the guitar and the amp. I play mostly clean or slightly gritty though; if I were after high-gain sounds, I might see the need for more EQing in the midrange.
 

Liarparadox

Member
Messages
440
CB Automatone Preamp Mkii is my main EQ. I got tons of presets I can switch to if needed.

And sometimes I'll use one of the switches on my EUNA to make a bit of an adjustment.

So I voted all the time, even though I don't have a stand alone EQ that I use.
 




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