Do you record guitar tracks dry or with your pedals?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by jhfire, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. jhfire

    jhfire Supporting Member

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    In the studio do you record your guitar tracks dry and then add your effects? (reverb, slap-back delay). I've always recorded them dry (cause that's what you're supposed to do, I've always been told). But this time I wanna go for a garage, black keys, low-fi type guitar sound.
    Any suggestions?
     
  2. swartzfeger

    swartzfeger Member

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    Do what you want to do and screw conventional wisdom or accepted practices.

    Record wet. If you like it, keep it. If you keep doing it and it still scratches that itch, you might have found your 'it' sound.

    If you record wet and isn't doing it for you, then maybe you need to go back dry and experiment.

    You can record both ways and A/B. Maybe sit on it a day... sometimes first impressions can play tricks on tired ears.

    Maybe you'll develop a hybrid approach. Whatever you decide, don't let option paralysis keep you from recording. :)
     
  3. rob2001

    rob2001 Member

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    I do Both. Each recording opportunity is different. Every song is different.

    If there is a drawback to recording with effects it's that they are there and you can't remove them. Same with compression an EQ on the way in.
     
  4. rob2001

    rob2001 Member

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    Quoted for truth!

    Thats a great term....option paralysis. It can be applied to many aspects of playing and gear.
     
  5. Scott Whigham

    Scott Whigham Member

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    I spent a lot of time (and a bit of money) buying some great reverb plugins so I opt to record dry and add that in later. My mood changes day to day sometimes - maybe on Monday I want a spring reverb but, when I come back in on Tuesday, I find I want a convolution reverb on it. If I recorded it wet, I wouldn't have that option.
     
  6. andybaylor

    andybaylor Supporting Member

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    I've been trackig like Eddie Kramer these days. I cut with FX and EQ.
    Shape the part right before going to tape.Also, I've been cutting in the amp room with headphones.
    No control room recording. THAT has made a huge difference in my tones.
     
  7. scredly

    scredly Member

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    I run the guitar through a DI and record both the dry DI signal and the mic(s) on whatever amp(s)/FX I'm recording. This gives me the option to reamp or use a plugin like Amplitube later.
     
  8. NBarnes21

    NBarnes21 Member

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    depends on the part, sometimes I'll track a clean guitar and add stereo delay and modulated reverb after the fact to get some trippy dreamy sounds, but if I want a nasty dark fuzz tone with snapback I prefer my analog delay pedal. Really just depends on the situation, no right or wrong really
     
  9. Somniferous

    Somniferous Member

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    Usually if the effects are part of how someone plays a part, or helps them play a part, I'll record them wet. Otherwise everything gets added in post. Although nothing annoys me more than a guitarist who doesn't realize that his delay isn't following the tempo of the song.
     
  10. slayerbear17

    slayerbear17 Member

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    some solo's I,ll just go in wet, but rhythm tracks dry.
     
  11. 66Park

    66Park Member

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    It depends on the sound, I guess, but I usually track with the effects, and I've never once had a producer that had a problem with it when it came to the final mix. They like to leave their studio rack stuff for the drums and vocals.
     
  12. Toogy

    Toogy Member

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    I use a DI and record both at the same time! Allows for more flexibility later
     
  13. jdps150

    jdps150 Member

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    I only use DI guitar for scratch tracks (while recording along w/ bass drums & scratch vocals).
    dirt & wah - never added via software. Chorus & phaser-usually pedals, might add it after the fact if the song needs it.
    2 weeks ago we were redoing a couple bass tracks, & we split his signal (direct out of boss TU2) one dry track, the other thru a Mojo Hand Analog Filter then each into a sans amp. Doing that we were able to blend them nicely.
     
  14. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    FYI the outputs of several leading tuners add a nice little digital buzz to the signal. One of the several reasons why I like my Peterson clip-on.
     
  15. jdps150

    jdps150 Member

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    Gonna have to check that out. I just got a boss tuner this week :(
     
  16. disfrontman

    disfrontman Member

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    In this digital recording age in which one can have a hundred separate channels @ mixdown, why on Earth would anyone not do BOTH? Certainly playing in front of a loud amp wet with FX will shape a guitarist's performance, usually for the better, but having flexibility later to try different things using the same exact performance is a great second option.

    Sometimes the guitarist's favorite "awesome, god-like" tone will not work well in a mix. Being able to either add to or completely replace it with a sound that better serves the song makes sense--particularly when it costs virtually nothing to do so. A splitter in the guitar's signal chain and an extra two seconds to arm just one additional track is all you need. Small price to pay for "tone insurance" without the hassle of retracking performances.
     
  17. Maltese Fan

    Maltese Fan Member

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    :agree
     
  18. Drewboy

    Drewboy Member

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    If your recording at home with unlimited time, experiment and let your ears be the judge. Every situation is different. Never know what will sound best to you. I been recording bass tracks dry and copying the track and blending the original with the copied track with reamp. Works well for what I'm hearing. For guitar, I wont record with anything except a little reverb on the amp. But I agree with the above that wah should'nt be added later. No software can replace a good wah pedal and foot to me.
     
  19. partytrain

    partytrain Supporting Member

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    I always do whatever sounds worse for the song. Not intentionally, it just happens that every time I listen back to my recordings, I can always find that track that I wish I did the opposite of what I recorded....
     
  20. jhfire

    jhfire Supporting Member

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    That's kind of why I started this post, afterwards I always ask myself "why the F did I listen to him"?
    Tonight's session went well, used just a minor slap'back and was told no reverb because of the way I was running the amps. Mind you this session I costing $ so I don't have that home studio budget, try this and that...
    Tomorrow day 2!

    Thanks for all the feedback! Especially the Eddie Kramer advice, love his work.
     

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