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Does it matter if tube amp is tilted?

Walpurge

Member
Messages
3
If I tilt a tube amp so it's angled slightly upwards, could that have any negative repercussions for the functioning of the amp in any way, providing it's secure and does not fall? I assume not, but to be honest every little thing to do with music gear and electronics has so many caveats and random things that can go wrong or that 'it's best to avoid', that I thought I may as well ask.
 

jnovac1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,314
If I tilt a tube amp so it's angled slightly upwards, could that have any negative repercussions for the functioning of the amp in any way, providing it's secure and does not fall? I assume not, but to be honest every little thing to do with music gear and electronics has so many caveats and random things that can go wrong or that 'it's best to avoid', that I thought I may as well ask.
all amps/cabs should tilt, IMNSHO. the “standback” is a good solution for most combos that don’t have tilt legs.
 

ToneDeVille

Member
Messages
5,155
Tilting a tube amp makes the electrons flow from the plate towards the bottom side edge of the tube glass, then bounce back up to the grid, as opposed to falling to the center of the bottom glass before bouncing. This is a result of gravity, and creates a subtle harmonic slightly less than 3.75 octaves above the 5th element. But only if powering the amp with 110v and with a non grounded plug while playing a 50's Telecaster. And if you turn the amp upside down, as Sid McGInnis does his 1963 Fender Showman, all of the electrons are forced, by gravity, to reside entirely on the plate, where they fry like microscopic eggs into a sonic frenzy before further splitting into a macroscopic mashup of atoms on the grid, resulting in a tonal blast of near nuclear proportions, commonly called mojo.
 

Steppin' Wolfe

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,946
Tilting a tube amp makes the electrons flow from the plate towards the bottom side edge of the tube glass, then bounce back up to the grid, as opposed to falling to the center of the bottom glass before bouncing. This is a result of gravity, and creates a subtle harmonic slightly less than 3.75 octaves above the 5th element. But only if powering the amp with 110v and with a non grounded plug while playing a 50's Telecaster. And if you turn the amp upside down, as Sid McGInnis does his 1963 Fender Showman, all of the electrons are forced, by gravity, to reside entirely on the plate, where they fry like microscopic eggs into a sonic frenzy before further splitting into a macroscopic mashup of atoms on the grid, resulting in a tonal blast of near nuclear proportions, commonly called mojo.
well, electrons do not act like water even though they are flowing through a valve. Eeehaw…
 

HerrRentz

Member
Messages
2,791
It also unbalances the torodial transformer resulting in an unstable warp field when cranked up to 11. Under 11, subspace field fluctuations are kept at a minimum as long as tilt angles do not exceed maximum recommended limits of 30° in any direction relative to inertial damper force.
 

hank57

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,274
When tilting you should be breathing in and then place amp at full tilt while exhaling.
 

Dr.Twang!

Atonal Optimist
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,227
I used to have a (planar) tilt problem with my large, octal tubes and small, nonal powertubes until I started running one of these amazing devices in my effects loop:

 
Last edited:
Messages
1,368
It also unbalances the torodial transformer resulting in an unstable warp field when cranked up to 11. Under 11, subspace field fluctuations are kept at a minimum as long as tilt angles do not exceed maximum recommended limits of 30° in any direction relative to inertial damper force.
Don’t forget to tilt the space matrix restoration coils in precisely 30° the opposite direction when done playing to restore subspace field balance.

Dont try to be sneaky either - if you’re accentuating with dilithium crystals - that’s solid state.
 

Blue410

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,102
To truly settle the matter, they're testing tube amps in zero gravity on the International Space Station.
Somebody will chime in to point out that the uberly-popular huge chuggy bottom end popular with "real" rockers won't exist in the absence of gravity to pull the electrons down (where the bottom end is lower they insist).
 

TooMuchFiber

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
726
Yes, it becomes a problem when you leap off the top of the amp during a show, causing the amp to crash backward and explode.
 




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