does Robben Ford just understand music better than other players ?

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by stumphead, Jan 8, 2019.

  1. PurpleJesus

    PurpleJesus Staff Member Gold Supporting Member

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    This is so true, and also why I find a lot of their playing more interesting than someone that has been “trained” in classical guitar method and techniques. For instance, w Hendrix, he’d throw in Wes Montgomery licks out of nowhere in a psychodelic fuzzy guitar solo, and it’d just work bc the tonalities and phrasing matched up w the changes even though it had nothing to do w “blues” music.

    I’ve always enjoyed putting a piece of sheet music written by Hendrix and a piece written by Page or Knopfler next to each other. Even just barely scanning the pages you can see immense differences in approach....it’s conjecture on my part, but I have always assigned that vast difference to musical education level (or lack thereof) and it’s fascinating to compare, to me, bc I’m a nerd. Lol.
     
  2. OldN'inTheWay

    OldN'inTheWay Member

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    I believe some people simply have talent that is beyond knowing "technically correct" concepts and techniques. These individuals are able to perform, for whatever reason, at a much higher level than the rest of us...which is why they're professional musicians and I'm not ( assuming most of us here have day jobs )

    I mean, I'm pretty sure guys like Scofield, Ford, DiMeola, McLaughlin, Beck, etc. didn't wake up one day and go, "I'm going to be a renowned world class musician"...( Idk, maybe they did (!), but you'd have to be clairvoyant to know that you'd become one of the best in your field ) but they had to have some sense that it was what they did best and wanted to pursue regardless of outcome. That level of ability is not something that most people can achieve...I believe it's an innate gift.
     
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  3. Hurricane

    Hurricane Member

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    :cool:
    His family is totally immersed in music , he played years with his brothers played years together -
    his dad was a musician .
    :JAM:rockin:JAM:band
    When you learn from older players when you are young you grow instantly old with a young
    person's enthusiasm and energy .

    He's much older than the average musician , music wise , kind of like one year to an average musician is 7 dog
    years of accumulated musical time inside of Robben and those like him :dude .

    Ez :

    HR
     
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  4. RLD

    RLD Member

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    Not sure if you'll hear any magic, but this is a good example of his live playing, which is more than basic blues licks.
    Phrasing, tone, note choice...all done superbly...and live.
     
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  5. harmonicator

    harmonicator Member

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    I dig Robben in most every setting. But it seems to me many posters in this thread are confusing him with Scofield. Ford has more experience in blues, Sco more in jazz. Both have done funk, fusion, electric jazz, Miles, etc.
     
  6. mcuguitar

    mcuguitar Gold Supporting Member

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    Perhaps. But Robben Ford sings and sings pretty well. In my perception that makes him multi-talented. The coordination it takes to play the instrument with the fluidity he does and sing at the level he does, IMO THAT separates him from these "other jazz/blues guitarists" you allude to. I've studied with Robben and other well known great jazz/blues guitarists: Norman Brown, John Hart, Scott Henderson, Carl Verheyen, Dan Balmer, John Stowell and more. (As a side note, I tried to study with John Scofield, but he was an arrogant cuss, but I digress.) Norman and Robben got the big record deals and they both play fantastic and they SING! Coincidence? I think not. I'm not saying it's fair, I'm just saying that when you're multi-talented, it helps in this business.
     
  7. ChicagoMusicExchangeMatt

    ChicagoMusicExchangeMatt Member

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    Thought this said Rob Thomas, and I definitely agreed!
     
  8. Bluesful

    Bluesful Supporting Member

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    That live cut, and the Monmoth College Fight Song solos are my 2 favourite RF solos.

    Seriously great stuff.

    And the tone on that live Jing Chi cut........
     
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  9. 2HBStrat

    2HBStrat Member

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    I agree...
     
  10. Bluesful

    Bluesful Supporting Member

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    That's the opposite to what I've heard.
     
  11. bdonnelly

    bdonnelly Supporting Member

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    "Modes are seriously over rated."

    I love TGP.
     
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  12. Chops

    Chops Gold Supporting Member

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    You either have it or you don’t.
     
  13. Bluesful

    Bluesful Supporting Member

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    Given your username I assume you have it?
     
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  14. stevebo

    stevebo Member

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    What's the GIT stuff?
     
  15. smv929

    smv929 Member

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    His sense of rhythmic sense (phrasing goes in there) is just off the charts. Whatever he plays you can feel the groove, especially if it's funky.

    He has great ideas for chord comping and knows chord theory extremely well. That's all what makes him stand apart. His solos are an extension of his excellent rhythm and chordal knowledge. Throw in some clever use of scales (diminished, melodic minor, lydian, or whatever else), executed using badass phrasing and wa la!
     
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  16. Melodic Dreamer

    Melodic Dreamer Member

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    Maybe this has been posted already, but here is a quote of Robben talking about Rosenwinkel.

    "I am indeed at heart much more of a blues player. I understand harmony, I understand the fundamentals of harmony altered chords and how to use them, so it's not a mystery to me fundamentally what's going on. However, people can certainly play things beyond my ability to understand them and if you're not aware of a guitarist by the name of Kurt Rosenwinkel, this guy is an astonishing guitar player and my favorite that I have heard in years. This guys harmonic sense is so developed, that I listen to him play...it's jaw dropping to me how sophisticated and at the same time very soulful this guy plays, beautiful sound, everything. I admire that tremendously and it makes me just a little sad that I'll never be able to play like that, but again I've made my choices, I'm a blues player."
     
  17. Bluesful

    Bluesful Supporting Member

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    Great quote.
     
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  18. dwoverdrive

    dwoverdrive Supporting Member

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  19. 57gold

    57gold Gold Supporting Member

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    Very musical cat. He swings and has developed a unique voice.

    Attended a 5 hour RF workshop, he is not deep into jazz harmony but has adapted basic jazz blues concepts into his vocabulary. Watch one of his Truefire videos and it will be apparent.

    He is not from the same school of guys like Mike Stern or Scofield or Metheny or Julian Lage, who are jazz players that can/could play the crap out of tunes like Giant Steps or bop like Donna Lee or regularly/easily superimpose complex changes into their solos. Robben's "jazz" experience with Miles was during his funk/open jam period and Miles dug his musicality and swing. Mike Stern, another alumnus of that Miles era, said that Miles was always encouraging him to "play like Jimi" when he tried to play bop lines over changes.
     
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  20. clayt0n

    clayt0n Member

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    This really is simply not true.
     

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